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  • Chain Saw Sharpener Stand

    When we first moved to our property there were many trees to cut down to make mowing easier, and because It took to long at the small motor shop in town to sharpen my chains, I bought this Italian made sharpening machine with it's Oregon label from Northern Hydraulics back in the early 90's, for around $235 as I recall, and the cast iron rivet buster and spinner I bought from Foley Belsaw for around $50. The Sears set of drawers hold: different thickness grinding wheels, a box of different size chain links, a raker depth gauge, files, bar grove cleaner, bar grove gauges and a book with chain sharpening info in it for all chains..

    It's not used that much now because of the property being cleared, but from time to time a storm does bring down a rotted tree or limbs which need to be dealt with, . and after the job is over with and before the saw is hung back up, the saw is cleaned and it's chain sharpened .
    Last edited by tackit; 08-18-2019, 09:03 PM.

  • #2
    I just bought a battery driven Chinkwaukee so I ain't gotta pull the rope on my Echos.
    I also bought a dozen new 1/8 files. Been filing chains since 1960 beginning with that miserable Remington with a rotating carb/handle and I intend to go out without ever grinding a chain.

    The man who comes up with a clutch system to start chainsaws with a battery drill motor is going to make a fortune.

    I'd do it, but Tack has me workin overtime on his weldingbench/grill/lunchwagon project with the charbroil grill/burning table on the other end.
    If he sends me one more "Taste the meat not the heat" Memo I may make a road trip.

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    • #3
      I need to come up with an old leaf rake to sick hot dogs on and hold them over a open fire, two trips to the pruning trash fire coals and the whole family would be fed. I still like the taste a wood fire gives...roll up some potatoes in aluminum foil and throw them in the coals and you got a good tasty outdoor cooked meal.

      A grill on the end of a welding table could be used to keep your welding rod, coffee, hot-dogs and homemade potato soup warm when winter comes around.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tackit View Post
        I need to come up with an old leaf rake to sick hot dogs on and hold them over a open fire, two trips to the pruning trash fire coals and the whole family would be fed. I still like the taste a wood fire gives...roll up some potatoes in aluminum foil and throw them in the coals and you got a good tasty outdoor cooked meal.

        A grill on the end of a welding table could be used to keep your welding rod, coffee, hot-dogs and homemade potato soup warm when winter comes around.
        Pipe burner under one end for grilled sammiches and bun toasting Tack. Slide a kettle of tater Leek soup far enough down the bench to simmer for a few hours. Gotta be tater leek or I ain't doin the choppin and them leek best be properly sweated in butter before anything else goes in the pot.
        Management gets on you about the grill you swear it's for preheating weldments.

        Far as the hots go, set up a slanted for roasting grill to roll em down for preheat, slash em, grill for about 35 seconds and load onto bun. Place here called Nick Tahos https://media.democratandchronicle.c...er/nick-tahous was moving over 2000 pounds of hots a day until Tobin Packing closed down. Tobin also supplied Yackos in Allentown, the Hot place owned by Lee Iacoca's family.

        Word is the ones Nicks kid sells now are half sawdust.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Franz© View Post

          Pipe burner under one end for grilled sammiches and bun toasting Tack. Slide a kettle of tater Leek soup far enough down the bench to simmer for a few hours. Gotta be tater leek or I ain't doin the choppin and them leek best be properly sweated in butter before anything else goes in the pot.
          Management gets on you about the grill you swear it's for preheating weldments.

          Far as the hots go, set up a slanted for roasting grill to roll em down for preheat, slash em, grill for about 35 seconds and load onto bun. Place here called Nick Tahos https://media.democratandchronicle.c...er/nick-tahous was moving over 2000 pounds of hots a day until Tobin Packing closed down. Tobin also supplied Yackos in Allentown, the Hot place owned by Lee Iacoca's family.

          Word is the ones Nicks kid sells now are half sawdust.
          Franz do you grow your own leaks? I'll tell the daughter to pic some up for me and have a go at making potato soup with leaks, Winter isn't that far away now, I need soup in the winter time,. we make a soup that has zucchini, navy beans, sauerkraut, tomatoes, and Italian sausage and olive oil that's wonderful and filling. I want to try putting a small pork roast in it, and slow cooker it all together.
          Last edited by tackit; 08-19-2019, 12:35 AM.

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          • #6
            Only thing I grow any more is garlic & horseradish. I dig enough garlic for myself and my girl Friday if she helps. Waitin on her now.

            Far as the radish goes, you want it, come dig it. Bring your own shovel too. Funny how I'm supposed to be dumb enough to dig that root so I can hear how good it was. I quit playing.

            Leaks grow at Wegmans and Tops. They sell by the pound. Knife in my pocket leaves all the tops right down to what I'm gonna slice up and cook. I don't slice past the white.

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            • #7
              That reminds me i have a few hundred feet of new chain...Bob
              Bob Wright

              Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
              http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Franz© View Post
                Only thing I grow any more is garlic & horseradish. I dig enough garlic for myself and my girl Friday if she helps. Waitin on her now.

                Far as the radish goes, you want it, come dig it. Bring your own shovel too. Funny how I'm supposed to be dumb enough to dig that root so I can hear how good it was. I quit playing.

                Leaks grow at Wegmans and Tops. They sell by the pound. Knife in my pocket leaves all the tops right down to what I'm gonna slice up and cook. I don't slice past the white.
                You have a Vampire problem as well eh? Me to.
                Well I'm not big on horse radish. But garlic, I plant that. Haven't had one (Vampire) around for ages, must be working.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Noel View Post

                  You have a Vampire problem as well eh? Me to.
                  Well I'm not big on horse radish. But garlic, I plant that. Haven't had one (Vampire) around for ages, must be working.

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                  Naw, since I planted it the now dead MIL stayed South of the Pa line.
                  I was disallowed from putting a few cloves in the box with her even though I claimed it was for the FIL since they'd be side by side.

                  Stuff we excavated today was all volunteer that deserted the original planting location. Not sure on species, the original seeds were free for the digging 20 years back. I forked & Friday stooped & picked. We ain't had rain in 4 weeks so the mound was a little hard to penetrate. Got 2 quarts out of a 3x3 mound, and I think Friday was tossing a lot of small cloves back in. She won't replant the bigguns. All I cared about was my homemade garlic fork worked.

                  Friday was in a good mood since I taught her to make garlic wine vinegar a few weeks back from the seed pods when I clipped them. Been a real strange growing year here, Usually don't dig garlic till mid to late September. This year all the stalks turned brown a week back.
                  Best heads I got were slightly smaller than a golf ball. German variety didn't even grow this Summer.

                  Ain't seen or heard any vampires though.

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                  • #10
                    I'm not sure what variety my garlic is, but it's a staple of green in the back yard for 20 years or better. Only recently sampling a fresh ripe seed, those are little garlics as well, who knew? If they weren't so much work to peel?
                    I don't do much with the scape's but let them go to seed. I never noticed a difference in bulb growth with removing them but again, I plant it grows.

                    And you are making garlic wine vinegar? Salad dressing I can see but what else? You'll have to share those secrets? A fella has to eat. You have a special dish you douse that onto?
                    That picture I posted wasn't all of the harvest. I had 100 plants in the ground. And while our season was a wet one, my spot has lots of sun and dries quickly.

                    I tend to over crowd my beds and I'm sure that's a factor in smaller heads? But next year's crop...I'm going scientific. My buddy swears by alfalfa pellets in the hole. Supposed to break down in a slow release of nitrogen? I've also set aside the largest heads to resupply cloves, the seeds from the same also because I'm trying to grow large round garlic balls. That Toonie ball is one large ball of garlic bliss.

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                    • #11
                      One on the left is definitely something I haven't seen. Do the heads break into cloves or is it one big round clove.

                      As long as your stems are green and attached you might as well braid them into skeins. It'll refresh your rope splicing skills. If you can't splice rope think small girl and braids. I just chop the heads off and spread them to dry.
                      You can also freeze garlic, but you can't refrigerate it or it will try to germinate and rot.

                      My bed is just a pile of rotted leaves and wood chips I get free from the Town. Whole lot of nutrition as the compost rots up. About 4" between seeds going in and make sure they are root down when planted or they rot.
                      I'll plant in October and see how it looks a couple weeks after snow melt.
                      Damp and well drained according to most literature.

                      Always fun to slip a few seeds into somebody's flower garden too.
                      Last edited by Franz©; 08-19-2019, 10:07 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Garlic wine vinegar is a lot of hard work, but it does give value from scapes & stems.
                        My direct knowledge of the use of the product is limited since I lacked qualifications to even taste test to determine when it was ready to be strained and filtered. Come to think, she who dreams of being listened to made out on that job since all she really did was taste test daily. I got taken to the cleaner.

                        Scapes and finely sliced stems from the scape area , especially varietys where the scape grows at the tip of the stem are superior to other garlics for incorporating into mashed taters and scrambled eggs, and a bud of mine includes them into his venison sausage.

                        Then there is cold marinating with meat P A I N T.

                        And of course garlic, basil and oregano direct from the plant on the dining room table minced and then perfectly distributed into pizza dough. Same combination with honey added to the dough makes a nice flat bread too, and if you pay attention to the baking and catch it right you can roll the thin loaf into a round that looks like a cinnamon bun to serve as a loaf and confuse invited diners.

                        Important part of garlic chopping & mincing is a plastic cutting board so you don't have to haul the wood block from the counter to outside to air. That stink gets sort of nasty day 2.5. Plastic board also allows chopping into olive oil and proper licking by short Italian female. I don't ask. She claims it's a Religious rite. Some kind of Holy oil I guess.

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