Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

millermatic 250x

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • millermatic 250x

    hello all new here, im in the market for a 250amp class mig. found a miller 250x for sale local and can pick up for 700 bucks. was built in 1999 so its 20 years old but judging by the pics its in great shape. i know the older miller with out digital display will last a life time. from what ive read there not that liked due to the harshness of the arch and can be hard to fine tune. but for the price its kind of hard to want to pass on it. trying to see if yall think its a good deal or not?

  • #2
    I don't know the difference between a MM250 and a 250x, but if you search the board you will find a lot of bad words about the 250. I have never run one, so can't say from personal experience, but I know it was a sales disaster for Miller. They may have their followers, but I know many won't have one. Maybe the 250x was a fix for the 250, but I don't know. I thought the "fix" machine was called the Vintage. I'm sure people with first hand experience will be here soon, but I would wait for more information before buying. For that price, or close to it, you should be able to find an old MM200 if you look hard enough. That is what you want--many say best one Miller ever made. I love mine, and only paid $500 for it about 6-7 years ago.

    Comment


    • #3
      from what i can gather, the hobart ironman 230 is pretty much the miller 250 but with tapped settings. i was set on buying the hobart but i got to thinking how i would miss the infinet voltage control that im used to at work(xmt 450). was also looking at the lincoln mp 256, as i can pick it up through my local airgas for 1800 after the rebate they have going and the ironman 230 would be around 1400.

      Comment


      • #4
        Check this thread https://forum.millerwelds.com/forum/...50x-questions=

        Hope that helps your decision

        Comment


        • #5
          id be running .035 flux or solid core in a unit this size, so i wouldnt be to concerend about the hot start issue. mostly want a machine this size for bigger jobs when i get into thicker material.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have a MM250 and have a good bit of experience on a 250x.

            You heard correct, it has a harsh arc and a tight sweet spot. But it’s also a powerful machine. I run everything from .030 solid steel to 3/64 5356 aluminum through mine. I paid $200 for it. Rescued it from under some guy’s tree out in his front yard.

            I don’t think I would pay more than $500 for one. Once you get used to it, it’s not as bad as many make it sound. In my opinion, the 250x is quite an improvement over the 250. It has the digital readouts, which are kind of touchy, but it should have the spool gun module in it already, so you’ll be set for aluminum. I run the big spools of aluminum through mine though. I really love .045 dual shield through it. The 250x also seems to have a nicer arc start, but that could also just be that my machine sucks.

            When comparing the mm250 series to the newer, smaller machines....she’s a beast. It’s like swinging a framing hammer for everything from wall studs to trim work. She can spray arc, short circuit, and keep running and running. I’ve only hit the duty cycle once....building steel pallets with .045 dual shield, hot and fast, multiple 48” welds on 3/4” steel fillets. That much welding will hit the duty cycle on almost anything.

            What are you mig welding needs? I ask because if you don’t need such a big machine, maybe a few hundred more dollars and have a brand new, more user friendly setup. There are lots of options.

            Also keep in mind that parts are going to start to get harder to find. I haven’t had to repair mine, and I honestly haven’t heard of a lot of repairs being made on them, but due to its age, it can be harder to track stuff down.

            Comment


            • #7
              I've seen 1 MM-250 repaired by a forklift ramming and tossing it, and another repaired by a car crusher press.

              In my opinion the crusher yielded more repair per dollar expended on energy output.

              The company that made those turds was so proud of them and their inability to make one run properly they quickly discontinued production, and later refused to even admit making the MM-250 turdspitter. Finally the unnamed manufacturer sent copies of their 80/20 Policy to dealers they had screwed, blued and tattooed.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                I have a MM250 and have a good bit of experience on a 250x.

                You heard correct, it has a harsh arc and a tight sweet spot. But it’s also a powerful machine. I run everything from .030 solid steel to 3/64 5356 aluminum through mine. I paid $200 for it. Rescued it from under some guy’s tree out in his front yard.

                I don’t think I would pay more than $500 for one. Once you get used to it, it’s not as bad as many make it sound. In my opinion, the 250x is quite an improvement over the 250. It has the digital readouts, which are kind of touchy, but it should have the spool gun module in it already, so you’ll be set for aluminum. I run the big spools of aluminum through mine though. I really love .045 dual shield through it. The 250x also seems to have a nicer arc start, but that could also just be that my machine sucks.

                When comparing the mm250 series to the newer, smaller machines....she’s a beast. It’s like swinging a framing hammer for everything from wall studs to trim work. She can spray arc, short circuit, and keep running and running. I’ve only hit the duty cycle once....building steel pallets with .045 dual shield, hot and fast, multiple 48” welds on 3/4” steel fillets. That much welding will hit the duty cycle on almost anything.

                What are you mig welding needs? I ask because if you don’t need such a big machine, maybe a few hundred more dollars and have a brand new, more user friendly setup. There are lots of options.

                Also keep in mind that parts are going to start to get harder to find. I haven’t had to repair mine, and I honestly haven’t heard of a lot of repairs being made on them, but due to its age, it can be harder to track stuff down.
                i want a 250amp class machine for when i get jobs to big for my 170amp machine. will it get used a great deal most likly not but id like to have it in the corner. plus if like to have some thing that 30years from now it will still be working. i was looking into the newer inverter machines, mostly the esab rebel 235. but i just dont trust the longevity of them. they might last 3 years maybe 15 years no one knows.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Man, I’m with ya on that. Most of my machines were used junk, brought back from the dead. My mm250 is my primary machine. Even with its flaws, it’s been a trusty addition to my shop and has far exceeded my expectations for what it was when I got it. It’s a big piece of iron to just sit over in a corner though. If you have a smaller mig machine and you get a job something of heavier iron, stick weld it. Or get the mm250 and use it, but actually use it, otherwise it’s just money spent on a metal box that keeps shop dirt from falling in that corner.

                  I’m looking to get another machine because I like running the .045 dual shield through my mm250 and I hate having to change wires, because I do use a lot of .035 solid wire as well. So I guess my situation is opposite of yours in that respect.

                  See if you can get the seller to come down on his price some.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    he was asking 1200, i got him down to 700. might beable to get him lower if i was in person with cash in hand

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by caleb90 View Post

                      i want a 250amp class machine for when i get jobs to big for my 170amp machine. will it get used a great deal most likly not but id like to have it in the corner. plus if like to have some thing that 30years from now it will still be working. i was looking into the newer inverter machines, mostly the esab rebel 235. but i just dont trust the longevity of them. they might last 3 years maybe 15 years no one knows.
                      How many tons a week are you moving across the shop floor?

                      You put a MM-250 in the lineup figure on a minimum 33% decrease for reworks.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        That’s not true at all. Outside of the harsh arc characteristics, I don’t have any trouble out of mine. The 250x at the maintenance shop I do side work for doesn’t have any trouble out of theirs either, and that’s not a mom and pop outfit. I find it unlikely you’ve even used one if you made a comment like that. I’m not defending the machine because I have one, but you are being awfully dramatic about it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                          That’s not true at all. Outside of the harsh arc characteristics, I don’t have any trouble out of mine. The 250x at the maintenance shop I do side work for doesn’t have any trouble out of theirs either, and that’s not a mom and pop outfit. I find it unlikely you’ve even used one if you made a comment like that. I’m not defending the machine because I have one, but you are being awfully dramatic about it.
                          Well Rayon, as usual YOU'RE INCORRECT.

                          I test drove a couple of those contraptions on the test bench at the LWS back when they first came out.
                          Actually, at that point in time, there were 2 Distributors of blue product in Rochester who had plowed blue ground for years for Miller Electric one being a LWS and the other being an industrial supplier. Both had inventory of the dreaded machines in stock.. Sales stunk and RETURNED machines graced both facilities.
                          Back before you toddled in a Welding Distributor put his reputation on the line with every machine sold, unlike today's world of telephone salesmen drop shipping from the factory.

                          Digging into a MM 250 it becomes very obvious the machine was rushed to market by incompetent manufacturing executives. The concept was good, use electronics to create an infinitely variable machine similar to the characteristics of the Airco DipStick machines with a sliding core transformer at a lower cost of manufacture, and avoiding Patents. Unfortunately, the electronics of the time weren't sufficient to reach that goal. The manufacturer would surely have known the machine was no substitute for the MM-200 which had racked up sales for Miller Electric for years and created expectations behind welding hoods IF they had done testing.

                          The manufacturer then further crapped on the welding industry by refusing to retro the MM-250 and came out with a successive model that wasn't better the 251 and another called the MM-250 X rather than fixing the machines already sold.

                          The manufacturer also refused to support the dealers who had built the blue market over 25 years leaving them holding the bag.

                          I fully realize you are a product of your generation conditioned on the concepts Edward Bernays wrote of, and anticipate Dunning Kruger works well for you. There is no point to arguing with a turd on toast who screams DRAMA.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            so we got one who says there not terrible and one who says if ya buy one your slow in the head. 50-50

                            Comment


                            • #15

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X