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Miller board help please

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  • #16

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    • #17
      Thank you so much Aeronca 41!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Agguilar View Post
        Thanks Noel you help a lot
        Well thank you, but the credit goes to all that offer help, and those who continue to try. When I mentioned the analogy of the fuel pump it was because I am buying that broken down van today and hope to fix it. Like you and the PAC, if we are successful, good deal. If not, we learn in the process. Just be methodical in your approach to problem solving and I'm sure you will be the guy.

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        • #19
          As noted in the thread link provided by Noel, you might try giving George's Plasma Cutter Shop a call--he is a very nice guy, and since this appears to be a common problem, he may be able to offer an easy fix. Never hurts to ask.

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          • #20
            What do you mean it’s not 1970 anymore?!

            I am disinclined to accept that as fact.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
              What do you mean it’s not 1970 anymore?!

              I am disinclined to accept that as fact.
              She told me that or something similar every time I started griping about how they were making things unrepairable, or things that were ridiculously expensive compared to just a few years ago. While she hated computers, and would not use one, and would not send or receive texts, I think she generally adapted to the current day better than I did.

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              • #22
                I will look more in to this parts : maybe there use it on this board like a thermal cut out switch, this is what I found on the internet:

                A thermistor is a type of resistorwhose resistance is dependent on temperature, more so than in standard resistors. The word is a portmanteau of thermal and resistor. Thermistors are widely used as inrush current limiters, temperature sensors (negative temperature coefficient or NTC type typically), self-resetting overcurrent protectors, and self-regulating heating elements (positive temperature coefficient or PTC type typically).

                Thermistors are of two opposite fundamental types:
                • With NTC thermistors, resistance decreases as temperature rises. An NTC is commonly used as a temperature sensor, or in series with a circuit as an inrush current limiter.
                • With PTC thermistors, resistance increases as temperature rises. PTC thermistors are commonly installed in series with a circuit, and used to protect against overcurrentconditions, as resettable fuses.

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                • #23
                  All true, but I'm afraid very unlikely to be relevant to your problem.

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                  • #24
                    I was thinking that it will be maybe the problem because of the relay in the board is in line with the compressor

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                    • #25

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                      • #26
                        So hooked to 12 volts, does it build pressure that little compressor? Pumped up any tires trying?
                        Again, I'm not the guy who knows anything, nor should you expect much for answers from me as a result, but I'm thinking, if 12 volts is 12 volts, what's the amperage required? Where does it come from? Is it not enough presently or as attached to a car battery, more then enough?
                        I don't wish to muddy the waters or veer off the path, but if the electronics appear to be good, I'd take the compressor apart, the motor that powers it and cleaning and oiling something to reduce friction? I'm not saying it's going to help or hurt, but have you got anything to lose in doing so? But if it is required to operate 12V low amps and it draws to much or many amps to do so...I'm thinking the unit will be shutting down as a result?


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                        • #27
                          Thanks I tried the unit whit out the compressor and it does the same thing

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                          • #28
                            Maybe I will try and design the board like in a cad program and try to understand better the functions of all the components

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                            • #29
                              Looking around more on the internet I found this video and maybe it’s the same concept use on the board

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                              • #30
                                Unless you have at least a couple of years of formal electronics training or are a very advanced amateur who has done design before, I think you are going to end up spending a good deal of money with no success. I would recommend trying to understand enough about the existing board to repair it long before you try designing new circuits. Not trying to put you down or discourage you—I admire your initiative—but you are headed toward a path that is not trivial. Please try to start by figuring out how the board you have works first. Don’t want to see you potentially spend a couple of hundred bucks on components and supplies and end up with nothing. If you are going to spend money, first get some training in electrical safety, then buy an oscilloscope and look for plans on the internet for a device called an octopus. Build one, study whatever you can find on the internet about how to use it, connect it to your oscilloscope, and begin testing individual components on your board. Look up information on the Huntron Tracker, which is a very advanced octopus that costs more than many people can afford to pay; the info on that tool will help you understand how to interpret what you see with your octopus.

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