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Welding after cataract surgery

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  • Franz©
    replied
    Originally posted by johndeerefarmer View Post

    No, but I will try it tomorrow
    Be forewarned your depth perception will be off until you get used to functioning 1 eyed.
    When you get used to it the depth thing becomes very manageable.

    Leave a comment:


  • johndeerefarmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Franz© View Post
    This is going to sound high on the dumb scale, but have you tried welding with a patch covering one eye since your retrofit?

    I occasionally get binocular double vision since having one retina professionally laser welded, and that is more fun than people relate having on LSD induced trips.
    Eye patch solves the problem real quick and I have my choice of views.
    No, but I will try it tomorrow

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    This is going to sound high on the dumb scale, but have you tried welding with a patch covering one eye since your retrofit?

    I occasionally get binocular double vision since having one retina professionally laser welded, and that is more fun than people relate having on LSD induced trips.
    Eye patch solves the problem real quick and I have my choice of views.

    Leave a comment:


  • johndeerefarmer
    replied
    One eye was done in May of last year and the other in Dec so I think the learning curve is over for me.

    I got some DeWalt safety glasses with 2 x diopter bifocal lens for use around the shop

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  • Franz©
    replied
    We've come lightyears since 1967 when this procedure of a lense swap put the patient in bed with his head sandbagged for 3 days. When the little woman finally did hers I timed it, 22 minutes from the Doc telling me to sit on the couch and have coffee until the job was complete and she was in the recovery area. It had been a big gamble for a woman who lost sight in one eye 5 years before to Lymphoma and a real learning experience for me largely thanks to the Inturdnet.
    That roll of the dice for her came out far better than she anticipated. She was amazed when she looked across the OR and read the clock without glasses for the first time in 20 years.

    Today millions are being spent at B&L to develop the next generation of implantable lenses that well may contain small motors to change the shape of the lense and deliver a different picture.

    Among the things I can assure you of is your brain and your rebuilt eyeballs need to sync up. That process takes time. It will come though.
    It will also be frustrating beyond belief and tolerance some days.

    I generally encourage people about to undergo the procedure and especially their companions to wear a patch over 1 eye for a couple days. It adds considerably to the onboard database and gives you tools to deal with the changes.
    Whatever else you do, ear safety glasses at all times.

    Leave a comment:


  • johndeerefarmer
    replied
    Thanks for the links.

    My left eye has astigmatism so had to get a different lens. Left eye got an Alcon Arysof Aspheric UV absorbing ReSTOR +2.5D multifocal TORIC lens Model SA25T5. Recommend for patients who require more intermediate (21") and distance (13') vision https://p.widencdn.net/v2a8te/W40-50...S_Restor_Toric

    Right eye got a Tecnis Multifocal lOL +3.25D for enhanced performance at 16 1/2" Outstanding, Full-Range Vision Tailored for Longer Reading Distances
    https://www.jnjvisionpro.com/product...ocal-iol-325-d

    I assume because I am younger (57) he gave me lens for intermediate vision vs close up. If I test the eyes individually the right one does better at reading fine print. Left one is better at computer work though both together are better than just one. Cheap 1.75x magnifiers make computer work way easier though.

    I have several older friends that got one eye for distance and one for close up stuff. Both are happy and don't wear glasses at all. If I knew what I knew now that might have been the best option. Having said that I don't know how those lens would work when welding. I am a farmer not welder so I don't weld for a living but when I weld something it needs to look good as well as be strong thus my frustration with my new eyeballs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    To put it mildly the instant discussion is getting a whole lot more complecatedered-esumtin than originally envisioned.
    Buds of mine who put groceries on the table by slaving in air conditioned comfort for B&L, quite probably the company that made your eyeball2.6 replacement lense as well as half of the equipment to do the job have been volunteered to get me inside B&L so I can see what they are talking about and sketching. Seems there is a bit more to lense tech than I remember from years passed.

    As I currently sit here, I am now aware of a situation the lense sketchers call "diopter clash" which I am pretty sure is a matter of mismatched focal lengths causing multiple lenses to become non additive as happens in prismatic binoculars or rifle scopes when an element becomes dislocated for simplicity of explanation. There is also possibility of other visual distortions entering the chain of image amplification caused by less than perfect element alignment.

    Quick and dirty- a single lense of proper power will usually give better results than multiple lenses attempting additive amplification.

    Second issue- COB illuminators.
    They just keep getting better and delivering more bang for the buck- quick and dirty comparison indicates Amazon sellers are a year behind state of the art and ebay from China direct is selling much closer to state of the art.
    I'm in the process of changing out kitchen cabinet internal illumination I installed 4 years ago - new illuminators are 10 times better.
    I haven't really had time to evaluate LED

    on the front ofa helmet acting as task lighting. One thing I am sure of is that the higher Kelvin number the better it works on steel and seeing cat hairs on the floor. LED is now on the market that is approaching 6000 K and that range works well for me, it may differ for others.




    https://www.ebay.com/itm/LED-COB-Chi...72.m2749.l2649 is a really nice COB emitter for attachment to a helmet. ADD HEAT SINKING




    These are a better choice for area lighting and are 120 volt AC units.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/LED-COB-Chi...72.m2749.l2649




    BOTH are bright enough you do NOT want to look directly into them. Both require additional heat sinking with heat paste conection and both can be destroyed by improper soldering technique.






    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Originally posted by Franz© View Post
    More as a matter of curiosity than anything else, when did you last change the batterys in your autodark? My experience with the LI cells is their performance curve causes the helmet lense to stay darker than it is set for as the age of the LI cell increases.

    Second possible solution is to add a couple of the newer LED cobb strips onto the face of the helmet itself with a 3 cell LI battery attached to the helmet. 8600 series LI batterys should yield a few hours of illumination. The new cobb strips are about half an inch wide and 2" long, and deliver light rich in the UV spectrum, around 6000k. Fortunately they are cheap enough to experiment with, under a buck each.
    Good and interesting info on the batteries aging--I never really thought about that, but it makes a lot of sense, and now that you mention it, I've seen that in LED flashlights and area lights.

    Leave a comment:


  • johndeerefarmer
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    I have, in the past, been welding in a dark corner of a project. I’ve used all sorts of ways to illuminate the work. Sometimes “playing the arc” just doesn’t keep me on track. I have work lights with hooks, straps, magnets, etc. I’ve even taken a flashlight and duct taped it so it shines down the length of the joint from the direction I’m traveling in. It actually worked really well. Gave just enough light to see the gap ahead of my nozzle.
    I bought some LED lights on a tripod stand so I will have to start using that too

    Leave a comment:


  • johndeerefarmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Franz© View Post
    More as a matter of curiosity than anything else, when did you last change the batterys in your autodark? My experience with the LI cells is their performance curve causes the helmet lense to stay darker than it is set for as the age of the LI cell increases.

    Second possible solution is to add a couple of the newer LED cobb strips onto the face of the helmet itself with a 3 cell LI battery attached to the helmet. 8600 series LI batterys should yield a few hours of illumination. The new cobb strips are about half an inch wide and 2" long, and deliver light rich in the UV spectrum, around 6000k. Fortunately they are cheap enough to experiment with, under a buck each.
    I changed the batteries in it in the last year or two. I wasn't aware that battery voltage would cause that but it's an easy thing to try.

    Is this what you are referrring too for a cobb light? https://www.amazon.com/Universal-Wat...ateway&sr=8-13

    I have the LED light on my helmet now but more light would be better. The main advantage to my head lamp is I can aim it directly at the weld

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    More as a matter of curiosity than anything else, when did you last change the batterys in your autodark? My experience with the LI cells is their performance curve causes the helmet lense to stay darker than it is set for as the age of the LI cell increases.

    Second possible solution is to add a couple of the newer LED cobb strips onto the face of the helmet itself with a 3 cell LI battery attached to the helmet. 8600 series LI batterys should yield a few hours of illumination. The new cobb strips are about half an inch wide and 2" long, and deliver light rich in the UV spectrum, around 6000k. Fortunately they are cheap enough to experiment with, under a buck each.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I have, in the past, been welding in a dark corner of a project. I’ve used all sorts of ways to illuminate the work. Sometimes “playing the arc” just doesn’t keep me on track. I have work lights with hooks, straps, magnets, etc. I’ve even taken a flashlight and duct taped it so it shines down the length of the joint from the direction I’m traveling in. It actually worked really well. Gave just enough light to see the gap ahead of my nozzle.

    Leave a comment:


  • johndeerefarmer
    replied
    Here's my update. I tried the red (or gold) lens in my old helmet. Might have been slightly more clear but not enough for me to give up my auto darkening hood. I have been using one of those for probably 25 years and can't go "backwards" now.

    I then got some magnifier lens for my Miller Digital Elite hood. I tried both 2x and 2.25x. Here is what I have found.

    For one, I need my bifocals on so I can see where to weld, then when the hood goes dark I need more magnification. So for me a 2x bifocal and a 2x cheater lens works fairly well. As I stated in my first post, the brighter the light is (doesn't matter if it's from the arc for from exterior lights the better.

    With these lens in my eyes, the trouble is, the more light I have the better I can see. In bright light I can read most print. The darker it gets the more magnification that I need.

    So what I really need is a magnifier lens in my helmet that adds more magnification the darker it gets

    I am going to try this for awhile and if not happy I will break down and buy the new Clear Light autodarkening lens for my helmet




    Last edited by johndeerefarmer; 09-03-2019, 10:18 AM.

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  • Noel
    replied
    Originally posted by Oldgrandad View Post
    No cataracts, but My eye aren't so good. I have a Jackson truesite lens in my hood super clear. I wear contacts that give good distance but need cheaters to read. At work we get 3M Nuvo bi-focal safety glassesI. I use 2.5's to weld and can see ok. Can't do sanitary pipe anymore though just can't see the seam. But still able to do all other welding. Certified pipe (TIG). I've done the cheaters in the hood those work nicely but with Bi-focal don't need the cheaters. TIGing on small stuff I'll trun the shade down to 10 sometimes 9. Welding flux-core back up to 11.
    Sound like most of us then. Reminds me I should get my eyes checked?

    Leave a comment:


  • Oldgrandad
    replied
    No cataracts, but My eye aren't so good. I have a Jackson truesite lens in my hood super clear. I wear contacts that give good distance but need cheaters to read. At work we get 3M Nuvo bi-focal safety glassesI. I use 2.5's to weld and can see ok. Can't do sanitary pipe anymore though just can't see the seam. But still able to do all other welding. Certified pipe (TIG). I've done the cheaters in the hood those work nicely but with Bi-focal don't need the cheaters. TIGing on small stuff I'll trun the shade down to 10 sometimes 9. Welding flux-core back up to 11.

    Leave a comment:

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