Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Welding after cataract surgery

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Welding after cataract surgery

    Hi, I had cataract surgery on both eyes at 56 years of age. I blame this on using Flonase for 20 years BTW!
    Before surgery my distance vision was sorry and close up was fair. I could see to weld without issue.
    The lens that were implanted gave me great distance vision in both eyes. Intermediate vision is good but close up vision stinks unless I am in bright light. I use a 1.5X to 1.75X to read in low light conditions
    I have a Digital Elite helmet. I mounted a 3 LED headlamp on the helmet, which might help a little. If I am welding thin metal, 1/8" or so the view is so blurry I can't see what I am doing. I am nearly welding "blind".
    Once I turn up the amperage to weld thicker metals, the arc is brighter and I can see perfectly and my welds are great.
    I have tried using some bright lights over the welding table which helps a little. I also use 2X reading glasses under my helmet.

    Has anyone had this issue? What did you do about it?
    Thanks


    If you are interested in antique tractors https://antiquetractorblogger.blogspot.com

  • #2
    That's an interesting subject for sure...........been welding since the late 60's........everything for sure changes. Used to be able to crawl around or lay on my back Tig welding under or in a chassis with the pedal propped up in various positions or pushed by someone else on the outside..........not so anymore......I only like to weld on the bench now where I can get close to the work and add extra lighting........I use a 2 power cheater in the helmet and can hold my own..........being in a comfortable position at least for me is key and for a while I did go back to my old hat changing lens colors to see if that made a difference in seeing the weld zone but came back to my Miller electronic hat...........My eyes are OK and need some correction but interesting enough my doctor said the pressure in one eye was much greater than the other.......she prescribed some drops that I do twice a day in both eyes and a different drop at bedtime in both and what a difference...........to the point that prescription glasses may not be necessary although i'm still going to try a pair and see if there is any value.............I think the key is just continue to work on those little things that you mentioned that gets more light on the subject and makes you more comfortable.

    Comment


    • #3


      Extra light is a false solution considering you're looking into an arc lighted picture.

      Cheaters, glasses, cataracts & nose hairs-

      OK, I threw nose hairs in to get your attention.

      Lets look at the situation from a couple steps back. The guy who installed the replacement lense has been paid by the Insurance Carrier and he needs new customers and return visits to make the next payment on his BMW, not to mention Alimony payments. He has absolutely ZERO interest in solving the problem because you won't come back if he does. That's established fact with 95.8639% of lense swappers.




      So, how do you solve your problem? You can spend a lot of time on the Inturdnet posting and reading, OR you can solve the problem with 5 bucks and a trip to Dollar General. Before you hop in the pickup, step into your welding shop and take a yardstick and someone who can read the yardstick with you.

      Either actually attempt to weld, or fake it without the helmet and machine turned on to establish the average distance between your now modified Mark 2.0 eyeball and the arc. It works best if you actually weld because my observation is most weldors vary this distance. Write your average work distance down and head for the pickup. You don't need to take the yardstick, Dollar General has tape measures back in the tool section you can use.




      When you get to Dollar General, set up an eye test. Place a dime size object at the average distance you weld, and test view different magnifications AT THAT DISTANCE until you find the best view. It's called Focal Length, eye doctors and lense changers call it Diopter to impress people with what they are paying student loans for. You have just performed the test Mr High Price should have done.

      Eye Docs are incapable of intaking verbal information from patients, so they don't listen. They can only hear the term “computer glasses” which ain't a whole lot different from welding glasses, but are more profitable to the Quack.




      IF your improved eyeballs delivered different Diopters on short range to target vision, the Dollar glasses aren't a perfect solution, but unless you have access to a real lense grinder who can provide exact numbers so you can order glasses from Zeni Optical they're as close as you'll get. There is no need for concern, the human brain is preloaded with a program to adjust to different inputs from both eyeballs.




      Now, buy 2 levels of magnification in each direction from the ones that gave you the best view with the largest lenses available. Trust me, you'll need them for different jobs. Metal frames are recommended, and buy a tube of SuperGlue so you can reinstall the lenses. The cheap glasses will require frequent replacement, but they only cost a buck so who cares when they get scratched. Remove installed helmet magnifying lenses and get to welding.




      Also be aware this system can and probably will cause you to drift when attempting to run a straight bead. CHEAT by using a soapstone to create simulated fog lines on the pavement to stay straight.



      Comment


      • #4
        Extra light is not a false solution. It does help you see the area around the weld, which helps you stay on track. I have a light that I sometimes attach to my hood. Used it today welding inside a compactor.

        Go ahead Franz, say something stupid about me being a fireman or something else stupid about my driver, or something else that nobody here has a clue what in the world you’re talking about.

        I hope it makes you feel better.

        John, try illuminating the area with a shop light or something you don’t mind getting some spatter on. No matter how careful you are, it will get spatter on it, so don’t use your wife’s favorite flashlight.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Franz© View Post

          Extra light is a false solution considering you're looking into an arc lighted picture.

          Cheaters, glasses, cataracts & nose hairs-

          OK, I threw nose hairs in to get your attention.

          Lets look at the situation from a couple steps back. The guy who installed the replacement lense has been paid by the Insurance Carrier and he needs new customers and return visits to make the next payment on his BMW, not to mention Alimony payments. He has absolutely ZERO interest in solving the problem because you won't come back if he does. That's established fact with 95.8639% of lense swappers.




          So, how do you solve your problem? You can spend a lot of time on the Inturdnet posting and reading, OR you can solve the problem with 5 bucks and a trip to Dollar General. Before you hop in the pickup, step into your welding shop and take a yardstick and someone who can read the yardstick with you.

          Either actually attempt to weld, or fake it without the helmet and machine turned on to establish the average distance between your now modified Mark 2.0 eyeball and the arc. It works best if you actually weld because my observation is most weldors vary this distance. Write your average work distance down and head for the pickup. You don't need to take the yardstick, Dollar General has tape measures back in the tool section you can use.




          When you get to Dollar General, set up an eye test. Place a dime size object at the average distance you weld, and test view different magnifications AT THAT DISTANCE until you find the best view. It's called Focal Length, eye doctors and lense changers call it Diopter to impress people with what they are paying student loans for. You have just performed the test Mr High Price should have done.

          Eye Docs are incapable of intaking verbal information from patients, so they don't listen. They can only hear the term “computer glasses” which ain't a whole lot different from welding glasses, but are more profitable to the Quack.




          IF your improved eyeballs delivered different Diopters on short range to target vision, the Dollar glasses aren't a perfect solution, but unless you have access to a real lense grinder who can provide exact numbers so you can order glasses from Zeni Optical they're as close as you'll get. There is no need for concern, the human brain is preloaded with a program to adjust to different inputs from both eyeballs.




          Now, buy 2 levels of magnification in each direction from the ones that gave you the best view with the largest lenses available. Trust me, you'll need them for different jobs. Metal frames are recommended, and buy a tube of SuperGlue so you can reinstall the lenses. The cheap glasses will require frequent replacement, but they only cost a buck so who cares when they get scratched. Remove installed helmet magnifying lenses and get to welding.




          Also be aware this system can and probably will cause you to drift when attempting to run a straight bead. CHEAT by using a soapstone to create simulated fog lines on the pavement to stay straight.


          I have tried from 1.5x to 2.0x lens from Walmart but haven't tried to actual measure the distance. I will give that a try
          If you are interested in antique tractors https://antiquetractorblogger.blogspot.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Distance lense to target is a critical. A 1.5 for instance is 1.5 at standard distance most people read a book but it is NOT 1.5 at average welding distance.

            Other possibles that occur to me, are you using cardiac medications? Several of them will mess with your vision particularly if you're astigmatic. Your new hopefully Bausch & Lomb lenses should void astigmatism since they are not being altered by the micromuscles of the Mark 1 eyeball any more, according to the folks at B&L.

            You'll also probably appreciate Jackson's RED filter lense in a standard helmet over green or amber. Indiana Oxygen has a bunch of reds last I knew.

            Braintrain will take time since your brain adapted to looking thru wax paper.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Franz© View Post
              Distance lense to target is a critical. A 1.5 for instance is 1.5 at standard distance most people read a book but it is NOT 1.5 at average welding distance.

              Other possibles that occur to me, are you using cardiac medications? Several of them will mess with your vision particularly if you're astigmatic. Your new hopefully Bausch & Lomb lenses should void astigmatism since they are not being altered by the micromuscles of the Mark 1 eyeball any more, according to the folks at B&L.

              You'll also probably appreciate Jackson's RED filter lense in a standard helmet over green or amber. Indiana Oxygen has a bunch of reds last I knew.

              Braintrain will take time since your brain adapted to looking thru wax paper.
              My welding supplier has never heard of a red lens. I checked Indiana Oxygen but they don't have much of a website. Also checked Jackson Safety's catalog but no joy. Got a part number? Thanks again
              If you are interested in antique tractors https://antiquetractorblogger.blogspot.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Since I'm doing this, I'll throw this in at no additional charge. Philips has very good information even the kids can use regarding cataracts.
                http://blog.phillips-safety.com/welding-lenses-colors/

                Might as well put this up too
                https://www.bakersgas.com/guide-for-...e-numbers.html
                While you're reading I'll be in the shop looking for my red helmet to find a part number.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Evidently Mother Nature decided the helmet and I both needed a bath, and donated same.

                  Lense is a Harris 81438

                  https://www.harrisproductsgroup.com/...ld-Lenses.aspx

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by johndeerefarmer View Post

                    My welding supplier has never heard of a red lens. I checked Indiana Oxygen but they don't have much of a website. Also checked Jackson Safety's catalog but no joy. Got a part number? Thanks again
                    Maybe you just looked at the generic Indiana Oxygen website; I thought their welding supplies site was at least half decent.

                    Did you see this one? https://www.weldingsuppliesfromioc.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      IOC doesn't list the Harris lenses. Mine came in a helmet deal and my presumption is Jackson put Harris lenses in helmets before they went to IOC.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Franz© View Post
                        Evidently Mother Nature decided the helmet and I both needed a bath, and donated same.

                        Lense is a Harris 81438

                        https://www.harrisproductsgroup.com/...ld-Lenses.aspx
                        Thanks I appreciate the part number and link. I had heard of gold and blue lens but not red so when you said red I thought you meant red not gold. Thanks again
                        If you are interested in antique tractors https://antiquetractorblogger.blogspot.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I thought the same thing. Don’t sweat that JD farmer, I don’t understand most of what Franz says anyway. He speaks in some sort of garbled code that only he knows what he means and the rest of us are stupid and don’t read enough old stuff to appreciate his level of brilliance. I call it fuddy-duddy. Pretty sure that’s a technical term too.

                          I see Kemppi offers a welding hood with lights built into the front of it. Esab offers an optional side mounted light. I use a modified fire helmet light mount and it helps.

                          Look around at the options for good quality auto shields and invest in yourself. Any money you spend on good face protection and vision capabilities will be money well spent. The different manufacturers each have their “special” thing that makes them different. I have a fancy miller hood that cost too dadgum much, but it’s very clear and adjustable for the varying processes I use. You’ll also need to consider the sacrificial lens and commit to change them more often than most of us do.

                          Depending on where you’re at, some welding suppliers offer a test lab where you can try machines and hoods out. Maybe you have one close by.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                            I thought the same thing. Don’t sweat that JD farmer, I don’t understand most of what Franz says anyway. He speaks in some sort of garbled code that only he knows what he means and the rest of us are stupid and don’t read enough old stuff to appreciate his level of brilliance. I call it fuddy-duddy. Pretty sure that’s a technical term too.

                            I see Kemppi offers a welding hood with lights built into the front of it. Esab offers an optional side mounted light. I use a modified fire helmet light mount and it helps.

                            Look around at the options for good quality auto shields and invest in yourself. Any money you spend on good face protection and vision capabilities will be money well spent. The different manufacturers each have their “special” thing that makes them different. I have a fancy miller hood that cost too dadgum much, but it’s very clear and adjustable for the varying processes I use. You’ll also need to consider the sacrificial lens and commit to change them more often than most of us do.

                            Depending on where you’re at, some welding suppliers offer a test lab where you can try machines and hoods out. Maybe you have one close by.
                            You also swipe flashlight batterys from the Department.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              No I don’t either.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X