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  • #46
    How many drivelines does that thing have?

    You should see them come in hot, at night, and flare hard before touching down. Those rotors warp skyward and light up with static electricity, looks like a thousand fireflies spinning around.

    And chinook is fast. Fast enough it can inflight refuel from a KC135.

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    • #47
      Tack, don't tell anybody but I can and have successfully lifted a Bell 9 feet off the ground and put it back down using only the rotor for lifting. Ol Harold had a 11 foot chain attaching that bubble nosed beach to a huge hunk of buried concrete and he'd shoot anybody who stretched that chain or even tried to.

      Only reason a Helo don't leak oil is it's out of oil.
      OK, maybe this one with Ryan the Clark Bar crook don't leak oil, but then it also don't go far.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
        How many drivelines does that thing have?

        You should see them come in hot, at night, and flare hard before touching down. Those rotors warp skyward and light up with static electricity, looks like a thousand fireflies spinning around.

        And chinook is fast. Fast enough it can inflight refuel from a KC135.
        Four, one from each engine and 5? independent shafts which are connected to each other with SS flex packs and run down the center of the aircraft and connect the combining box and the front transmission, I can't remember if the combining box was shafted to the aft transmission, but It had to be. I never had to pull one out that I can recall, but I did an aft transmission once, I just can't remember what it looked like back there.


        I never seen the sparks you are talking about, but it was always humid where I was stationed. The job I dreaded most was changing fuel bladders that took rounds through them, the fun job for me was tracking blades at full power.
        Last edited by tackit; 08-04-2019, 10:16 PM.

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        • #49
          How about this one Tack? 2 toyots.
          https://youtu.be/vJSbFodwXFI

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          • #50
            They have to be coming in hard to get the full light show. They build up a lot of static electricity in flight. When you’re sling loading from a hovering chinook, you have to ground the bird prior to reaching up and latching the cables. We used a tent stake on a mop handle with claymore wire going to another tent stake in the ground. The pathfinder guys would say there’s enough of a charge to knock your butt off the top of whatever you’re sling loading. I was never brace enough to test that out.

            I’m not at all familiar with that twin rotor bird, but it looks Soviet to me. There’s something about Soviet helicopters that have always creeped me out a little bit. That thing has a couple of big engines on it for such a small airframe.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
              They have to be coming in hard to get the full light show. They build up a lot of static electricity in flight. When you’re sling loading from a hovering chinook, you have to ground the bird prior to reaching up and latching the cables. We used a tent stake on a mop handle with claymore wire going to another tent stake in the ground. The pathfinder guys would say there’s enough of a charge to knock your butt off the top of whatever you’re sling loading. I was never brace enough to test that out.

              I’m not at all familiar with that twin rotor bird, but it looks Soviet to me. There’s something about Soviet helicopters that have always creeped me out a little bit. That thing has a couple of big engines on it for such a small airframe.
              We were instructed to grab the hook fast and hard to keep from getting shocked. The Chinook cost 1.5 million a copy back when it first came out, it has gold dust in it's windshields to defrost them, and had a stability augmentation system that used ports on the sides of the ship to fly it when it was carrying a slung load, the system kept loads from swinging by moving the swash plates instead of pilots flying the ship..

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              • #52
                I’ve never been in one with a sling load. I’ve only slapped the shackle into the hook. Almost took a loadmaster’s head off one time at night. He was looking through the floor hatch, presumably guiding the pilot, when I mistook his dome for the lift hook. Fortunately I was able to sort of stop before I made his day.

                I’ve jumped out of them, fast roped out of them, ****-cast out of them, pushed a zodiac off the ramp. Those birds can lower the back end into the water to drive a boat right up inside. I always liked heli jumps, much smoother and a lot less time in a harness and time in the air. Tail gate jumps are generally better anyway, be it fixed or rotary wing.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                  I’ve never been in one with a sling load. I’ve only slapped the shackle into the hook. Almost took a loadmaster’s head off one time at night. He was looking through the floor hatch, presumably guiding the pilot, when I mistook his dome for the lift hook. Fortunately I was able to sort of stop before I made his day.

                  I’ve jumped out of them, fast roped out of them, ****-cast out of them, pushed a zodiac off the ramp. Those birds can lower the back end into the water to drive a boat right up inside. I always liked heli jumps, much smoother and a lot less time in a harness and time in the air. Tail gate jumps are generally better anyway, be it fixed or rotary wing.
                  I never jumped out of an aircraft, stories about chutes not opening and emergency chutes getting tangled in the main chute caused me not become keen on the idea.

                  I think Chinooks are float tested.

                  Here's a pics of the ship my good friend Larry Creacy from Texas died in two days before I flew out of Tan Son Nhut Air Base for home. He was taking the place of the night shift TI who went on RR, while sitting inside the ship in our maintenance area going over the ships log book, a mortar round came through the side of the ship where he was sitting and blew up in his face, the guys said he walked to the front door of the ship, called out for help, and then collapsed. Larry bled to death on his way being flown to hospital. He was a good guy, I really liked Larry, and the other crews members who went down in their ships. We had a captain get shot in the butt while flying, it seems a round found the gap in between the pilot seat's armor plates.
                  Last edited by tackit; 08-05-2019, 06:03 PM.

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                  • #54
                    Thanks for sharing that story, tack. It’s important that we never forgot the ones we lost. Those men are the giants whose shoulders I stand on and do my dead level best day in and day out to make meaning of what life I have been granted to share.

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                    • #55
                      Ditto, Ryan. We must never forget. And do all we can to counter the crazies who spend every day condemning the principles men like this died for.

                      Thanks for posting, Tack.

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                      • #56
                        I've heard of guys shipping things home, even know a man who is a member of Ryan's Union -retired- who shipped a Jeep minus engine back to mom and dad, but he was a beginner compared to Tack.

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                        • #57
                          You're very welcome guys, and thank you for serving Ryan, Aeronica and Franz as well, and every soldier on the board.

                          Another sad story I can tell is about a great young Black soldier who was married and had kids and worked in company administration, his name was Jim. Jim wanted to earn flight wings to wear on his uniform so he volunteered to go on five missions I think it was, He died when his aircraft was shot down and all hands on board were lost. Jim was one of those really nice people that you couldn't help but like being around, his manner was always pleasant and kind, it still saddens me sad when I think about him and the rest of the crew of tw crews that died in action, all wonderful men. I had three high school friends die in Vietnam too, as I'm sure many of us have.

                          One day I volunteered to ride shotgun to go pick up parts for our choppers at Bien Hoa Air Force base, when we got there me and the driver went to find a mess hall because we always heard how great the Air Force treated their soldiers, and how they even had ice cream in Vietnam.

                          I will l never forget as we were walking down this long quiet empty road to get to the mess hall, with no one on the road but us, seeing off in the distance stacks of aluminum boxes lined up three or four deep and as high and as long as a building they were stacked against, they must have been stacked 8 or 10 boxes high, as we got closer to them we could see and hear tags ticking off the boxes from being blown by the wind. .

                          t never hit me until we were within a few hundred feet of the boxes what we were seeing, . it was graves registration building. .

                          I can still see the stacks of boxes and the tags flickering in the breeze and hear those tags ticking off the boxes like it was yesterday, such an eerie felling came over me as we walked passed those boxes, but seeing them helped me to put the numbers of dead we were hearing about in prospective.. I can see those boxes in my mind right now like it was yesterday.

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                          • #58
                            I've no idea if BirdsEye is still in business making and selling frozen foods. In the 60s BirdsEye was an unquestioned leader in preserving taste and more important in the food industry color.
                            Inside Tack's GRU building were 2 freezer units, one rapid cooler and one low temperature R-502 holding freezer.
                            Both units were manufactured by Clarence Birdseye Corporation.
                            The freezers were in place and functional in 1965 in the North. Undoubtedly other freezers were in place at other locations.
                            Those containers- aluminum/ reusable Tare 78 pounds air transportable (open vents) slid in and out on rails.

                            It's probably not sane, or even reasonable. I'll even say freezing bodies may have been the most humane and decent act possible. What annoys me is the capacity Uncle Sugar had in place in 1965. Some filthy buzzard had plans for the mass killing of Americans for no reason beyond profit.
                            I do NOT and will NOT buy or consume BirdsEye products!

                            My First Cousin is on Row 108 of panel 01E. He became a Marine because he got kicked out of High School. I can still hear his dad relating how his Aunt in California was taken to the hanger by her Congressman's assistant accompanied by a Priest to a cart topped by a flag draped container- aluminum/ reusable Tare 78 pounds air transportable (open vents) awaited her stood at the corners by Marines in Dress blues so she could pray for her beloved nephew and place her Rosary in his hands. Jenny called later, long distance and told him something was terribly wrong, the box was so cold and the Marines wouldn't open it so she could put the Rosary in her nephews hands. Jenny could send money if needed so the Marine wasn't buried in that terrible cold box. He wasn't.

                            As I endeavor to not take this political I'll close with the absolute there are minimally 40,000 names missing from that miserable black wall.



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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Franz© View Post
                              I've no idea if BirdsEye is still in business making and selling frozen foods. In the 60s BirdsEye was an unquestioned leader in preserving taste and more important in the food industry color.
                              Inside Tack's GRU building were 2 freezer units, one rapid cooler and one low temperature R-502 holding freezer.
                              Both units were manufactured by Clarence Birdseye Corporation.
                              The freezers were in place and functional in 1965 in the North. Undoubtedly other freezers were in place at other locations.
                              Those containers- aluminum/ reusable Tare 78 pounds air transportable (open vents) slid in and out on rails.

                              It's probably not sane, or even reasonable. I'll even say freezing bodies may have been the most humane and decent act possible. What annoys me is the capacity Uncle Sugar had in place in 1965. Some filthy buzzard had plans for the mass killing of Americans for no reason beyond profit.
                              I do NOT and will NOT buy or consume BirdsEye products!

                              My First Cousin is on Row 108 of panel 01E. He became a Marine because he got kicked out of High School. I can still hear his dad relating how his Aunt in California was taken to the hanger by her Congressman's assistant accompanied by a Priest to a cart topped by a flag draped container- aluminum/ reusable Tare 78 pounds air transportable (open vents) awaited her stood at the corners by Marines in Dress blues so she could pray for her beloved nephew and place her Rosary in his hands. Jenny called later, long distance and told him something was terribly wrong, the box was so cold and the Marines wouldn't open it so she could put the Rosary in her nephews hands. Jenny could send money if needed so the Marine wasn't buried in that terrible cold box. He wasn't.

                              As I endeavor to not take this political I'll close with the absolute there are minimally 40,000 names missing from that miserable black wall.


                              I remember traveling by truck to Bien Hoa we passed over the Saigon river bridge, on it's banks was a small Shell oil tank farm, the way I remember it had two or three tanks with the Shell Oil logo painted clearly on their sides, word had it that Shell paid the North not to hit their property, the same went for rubber plantations, seems the war was fought around them too. Money money money.

                              https://www.goodreads.com/author/quo...edley_D_Butler

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                              • #60
                                HRM Willie of Holland had agreements with everybody in that region of the planet. She was a savvy old girl who understood the costs of war given her losses in World War 2 when Japan took over her holdings on what was then Dutch East India after taking most of the US 7th fleet out of the game. The Royal part of the name means the company is Willie's personal property. She also had drilling platforms working holes just over the horizon at CamRahn, and her own on shore facilities.




                                Dial back to around 58-60 and Willie had some concerns regarding her holdings on what was then called Indonesia. Most of her military was sent there to discuss the situation with locals claiming to be Muslims for a while, and she got weary of young Dutch men coming back to Holland in boxes. Most of the then “media” of the world had set up in Jakartas hotels and *****house bars to cover the pending war only to be disappointed when Willie solved the problem by sending in contractors to advise locals she could and would get nasty protecting her family fortune. Chet & David reported on the situation about once a week until it ended suddenly with sharks designating Indonesia a tourist attraction with fine dining.




                                VietFnam was running on a parallel time track with EisenCoward's playmates from the DO section of CIA screwing around trying to prove they could establish a puppet state. Michelin had cut deals similar to Willies and rubber continued to flow.

                                In 60 Kennedy screwed up by sending Johnson to evaluate the situation. LBJ saw money to go into his pockets and Kennedy's plan to get out and forget the Peninsula was rapidly turned around as LBJ was sworn in as President.




                                The US taxpayer paid rent on every US occupied square foot of the peninsula and also paid per GI + civilian employee on the soil. There was even a fixed number of US bodies in the lease allowed to remain in Saigon overnight. Waht nobody mentioned was that US boots had been on the peninsula since 1939. Also not mentioned was the reality John Foster Dulles and MendesFrance had personally told EisenCoward that the only man who could peacefully run VietFnam was Uncle Ho. EisenCoward refused to go along because he was scared of Nixon who had been Joe McCarthy's chief investigator before becoming VP. The Cardinal of Chicago helped EisenCoward pick the next leader of the South.




                                And, about them rubber trees; Michelin had a contract for US taxpayers to pony up for every injured or killed rubber tree signed by MacNamara of Ford who attended Mass 7 days a week.

                                Anybody ever mention MacNamara's 100,000 idiots?


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