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  • How many days before I can turn on my compressor

    My compressor has been laying on it's side for a few months with it's oil drained, I have been told to wait from one day to a few before I turn the compressor on after it's put vertical tomorrow. Have any of you knowledge about such things, Franz?

  • #2
    To begin, define Drained. Did you drain the machine before you laid it down, or did you let the oil run into the pistons?

    IF drained before, refill to appropriate level with correct oil and rotate by hand a few turns to clear cylinders.
    Double check oil level
    If correct turn it on.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Franz© View Post
      To begin, define Drained. Did you drain the machine before you laid it down, or did you let the oil run into the pistons?

      IF drained before, refill to appropriate level with correct oil and rotate by hand a few turns to clear cylinders.
      Double check oil level
      If correct turn it on.
      Yes it was drained before it was laid on it's side, I'll have to remove the belt safety shroud to get at the flywheel, but if waiting one day would be sufficient, I would rather wait, getting things back right and all the screws put back in for me can sometimes be almost impossible.

      It takes 2 qts of straight 30 wt. non-detergent, and I add 2 ounces per quart of MotorKote to the oil. it sounds real nice when it's running, you can hear the steady thump, thump, thump, sound coming from the compressor.

      Is it possible to bore out a compressor to produce more CFM, or would bigger valves also have to be included? I also wonder if it's possible to get 25 CFM at 100 PSI out of a bored out 18 CFM compressor and still use it's 5HP motor if a larger diameter flywheel was used?

      Comment


      • #4
        Anything is possible. The question "Is it intelligent and cost effective" is probably more relevant.

        For example, Champion used the same compressor on 2.5, 5 and 7.5 horsepower motors delivering different cfm. Speed of rotation is the key to getting more CFM out of the jug. Exact rpm numbers escape mem but lets say at 2.5 ponies the jug spins at 600 rpm and delivers 10cfm [example rating only]
        A 5 pony motor can spin the jug at 800 rpm and deliver 15cfm, and a 10 pony can spin it at 1200rpm and deliver 20cfm. Additional speed both reduces service life and increases electron consumption leading to higher cost per cubic foot of compressed air.

        You also need to factor in consistency of consumption. Example, 80 to 90% of Tacks use is to blow up a couple tires and only occasionally does Tack require cfm to operate his media blaster for 15 minutes. Starting a 20cfm machine to blow up tires is dumb, and a 5cfm unit won't run the media blaster. Tack's consumption is best served by 2 machines, or 1 machine with increased segregated storage. Of course that goes against the man cave model requirement where the idiot with the biggest tank on the block shows it off, and because he's an ignorant savage, calls it a tank even though the first vessel after the compressor is a receiver, not a tank.

        Long and short of the story, were I in your boots, I'd be talking to your propane driver to see if he can come up with a 100 gallon tank you can hang up in the rafters to eliminate it taking up space on the floor. Also talk to the welding supply house to see if they have any 330s so old they won't recert them.
        Just DON't use a well tank.

        Stand the monster up, wait 15 minutes after filling with oil, and give it a half second shot of electric. That shouldn't blow the lid off. My preference would be to roll it by hand, but a man's gotta do what he can do.
        Let it sit overnight and you're 99% safe.
        Last edited by Franz©; 07-26-2019, 12:11 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks Franz, I have a question, wouldn't putting on a larger diameter flywheel/pulley also speed up the compressor? Also if I added an easy start air/bleeder type valve wouldn't it help the 5 HP motor get the compressor up to speed saving power and increasing the life of the motor?

          Like you say my compressor sits most of the time, I hate to hear it run so I bought electric tools whenever I could, when I do run the compressor I put ear protection on, I absolutely hate loud noises, probably because of working in steel mills, shooting, tracking rotor blades on Chinooks, and having an artillery battery sending rounds over us in Vietnam. The concussion would bounce things of the hooch walls, mortars were easy, rockets and our own mistaken artillery dropping in on us from 7 miles away, not so much.

          I remember when I got back from the army and went to work for the RR as a signal maintainer, I bid on a hump job, which one of it's duties was to go down into the classification yard and sweep switch plates and give them a good coat of Slip Plate graphite paint once a week. Sometimes when a train was about to get it's last cars added to it, the end of the train would be up near the hump's yard switches where I was working, as I was working cars would roll by me quietly and then slam into each other on the end of the train, the horrible sound they made crashing into each other was just like the sound of a rocket going off, It took awhile for me to get used to the noise., now I love quiet .

          Comment


          • #6
            Your compressor should already have some sort of an unloader valve. If it’s an older compressor it will likely be a centrifugal unloader, in which case we’ll hope it still works. If it doesn’t work or you have a more modern type, the unloader valve is generally part of the pressure switch. It looks like a shrader valve off to the side of the switch body and probably has a 1/4” copper tube running to it. The centrifugal unloader will be in line with the crank shaft and also have a similar tube running to it. I’m either case, there will be a check valve, usually at the point the tube from the compressor headed first enters the tank or receiver or whatever you want to call it. Off of that valve, or above it, will be the origin of the 1/4” tube for the unloader.

            Is your compressor splash lubricated or injected?

            Comment


            • #7
              Quiet....reminds me of that old cartoon “rock-a-bye bear”. If you haven’t seen it, do a search for it. It’s pretty funny.

              That’s my new imagine of you Tack, an old bear screaming “DON’T MAKE NOISE!! I DON’T LIKE NOISE!!”

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                Quiet....reminds me of that old cartoon “rock-a-bye bear”. If you haven’t seen it, do a search for it. It’s pretty funny.

                That’s my new imagine of you Tack, an old bear screaming “DON’T MAKE NOISE!! I DON’T LIKE NOISE!!”
                Yeah you would be right too... I wouldn't ride in the SIL's pickup because he was running straight pipes. https://vimeo.com/64931593

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by tackit View Post
                  Thanks Franz, I have a question, wouldn't putting on a larger diameter flywheel/pulley also speed up the compressor? Also if I added an easy start air/bleeder type valve wouldn't it help the 5 HP motor get the compressor up to speed saving power and increasing the life of the motor?

                  Like you say my compressor sits most of the time, I hate to hear it run so I bought electric tools whenever I could, when I do run the compressor I put ear protection on, I absolutely hate loud noises, probably because of working in steel mills, shooting, tracking rotor blades on Chinooks, and having an artillery battery sending rounds over us in Vietnam. The concussion would bounce things of the hooch walls, mortars were easy, rockets and our own mistaken artillery dropping in on us from 7 miles away, not so much.

                  I remember when I got back from the army and went to work for the RR as a signal maintainer, I bid on a hump job, which one of it's duties was to go down into the classification yard and sweep switch plates and give them a good coat of Slip Plate graphite paint once a week. Sometimes when a train was about to get it's last cars added to it, the end of the train would be up near the hump's yard switches where I was working, as I was working cars would roll by me quietly and then slam into each other on the end of the train, the horrible sound they made crashing into each other was just like the sound of a rocket going off, It took awhile for me to get used to the noise., now I love quiet .
                  Putting a larger diameter pulley/flywheel on the compressor will make it run slower, not faster. If you want it to run faster, you need a smaller pulley. That will make it run faster, up to the limits of where the motor starts to bog down due to the increased load. A larger diameter pulley on the motor will also make the compressor run faster.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post

                    Putting a larger diameter pulley/flywheel on the compressor will make it run slower, not faster. If you want it to run faster, you need a smaller pulley. That will make it run faster, up to the limits of where the motor starts to bog down due to the increased load. A larger diameter pulley on the motor will also make the compressor run faster.
                    Thanks 41, I should have remembered my motorcycle days, a 17 tooth primary sprocket on a 1964 Triumph motorcycle was faster than a stock 19 tooth primary sprocket. I think guys who wanted faster take offs put on bigger rear sprockets and smaller front sprockets. I'm mixing up low end power with top end speed?


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                    Last edited by tackit; 07-26-2019, 12:42 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Yep--I read that post a couple of times before it hit it me that it was backwards. I just visualized changing the speed on my drill press by changing the belt position on the cone pulleys. The power vs. speed thing is where it's at, as you say.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post
                        Yep--I read that post a couple of times before it hit it me that it was backwards. I just visualized changing the speed on my drill press by changing the belt position on the cone pulleys. The power vs. speed thing is where it's at, as you say.
                        You nailed it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Factory unloaders on compressors are barely sufficient to get the job done the day the compressor arrives.

                          Noise from all but high speed imitation compressors is nearly unnecessary if the machine is installed right. In my estimation 99% of installed air compressors are installed WRONG. I've just wearied of people paying for compressed air who insist on making things as hard for themselves as is possible and like throwing $$ at the poco.

                          Harbor Fright ain't a supplier for compressors or welders, but people think they are. Eaton is off shore low bid crap being assembled by high school kids and shipped. People want that crap can have it.

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                          • #14
                            Days? I would not have even hesitated seconds, so long as it is filled with oil. Now refrigerator-type compressors I understand, but not air compressors.

                            Just put it outside like I did. No noise when it's 80ft+ away. Throw in the whisper intake box, and I can't even tell where my air is coming from

                            HTP Invertig221 D.V. Water-cooled
                            HTP Pro Pulse 300 MIG
                            HTP Pro Pulse 200 MIG x2
                            HTP Pro Pulse 220 MTS
                            HTP Inverarc 200 TLP water cooled
                            HTP Microcut 875SC

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by OscarJr View Post
                              Days? I would not have even hesitated seconds, so long as it is filled with oil. Now refrigerator-type compressors I understand, but not air compressors.

                              Just put it outside like I did. No noise when it's 80ft+ away. Throw in the whisper intake box, and I can't even tell where my air is coming from

                              [IMG2=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"full","src":"https:\/\/drive.google.com\/uc?export=view&id=14XtPI08HbQ5fTX4W_a1sAc36XXAYqkOK"**[/IMG2]
                              We can't do like you did here where I live, leaving it outside in an open sided building, the snow, ice, and rain would ruin the compressor inside of 6 months. Plus I'm to old and broken up to take on unnecessary work these days. The shop is pretty much the SILs now, I don't have the ability to work in it anymore.

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