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WHAT did Ryan do?

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  • WHAT did Ryan do?

    Perhaps more important, how did he do it?

    Note he only used ladders for tools to accomplish this job.

  • #2
    Wasn't me. It was them booger eatin' A-shifters.

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    • #3
      I don't see Ryan anywhere in that pic...
      Richard

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Ltbadd View Post
        I don't see Ryan anywhere in that pic...
        Ryan paid me an orange bar to photoedit him out.

        The driver should go on unemployment and the Bugle boy should be promoted to Department Manure Shoveler for that rig rolling out the door.
        Look close at the X, the spring perches and the Hutch Arm mounts are MIA along with any sign of U bolts being there. That E One pumper is a Reserve Truck that only rolls occasionally.
        Pretty obvious NOBODY INSPECTED the rig in months.

        Ryan can go weld it back together, parts should be on the house floor. They don't have money for a new EXPENSIVE pumper, and they don't have the brainpower to buy one of 3 pumpers currently on auction in NY State for under $15,000.

        They want a NEW truckietoy!

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        • #5
          $15k won't even buy you a pump on a modern fire truck.

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          • #6
            Isn't that the easy way to inspect a rear axle? Remove it from under the truck first.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
              $15k won't even buy you a pump on a modern fire truck.
              You my boy just don't know how to shop.

              A used fire truck, be it a pumper or a ladder, is a ZERO value asset.

              Fire trucks can not be registered under any classification other than Fire Truck and few insurers will cover fire trucks in private hands. Consequently most wind up going to scrappers.

              In the instant situation, the Carrier for the District will undoubtedly cut a small check to the District for the ACTUAL value of the truck based on regional prices determined by Auction Sales and sealed bid sales. Taxpayers will take a bath on the deal because the usual low intelligence civil serpent in Purchasing didn't do their job properly.
              Remember, the Carrier only contracted to pay the value of the truck at the moment of loss!

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              • #8
                Might be ok for a backwoods volunteer department but in a high volume urban department, no way you could get away with that. It's not as simple as you make it sound.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                  Might be ok for a backwoods volunteer department but in a high volume urban department, no way you could get away with that. It's not as simple as you make it sound.
                  You forgot to include IAFF infested low volume District where the pumper under the command of an IAFF Chief who has been SUSPENDED from his previous 2 IAFF jobs who doesn't INSPECT & maintain equipment, especially the Reserve Pumper probably managed to get the District Board drunk enough to sign an IAFF dream contract.

                  The dangerous vehicle driven by a Professional IAFF member was making its first trip out of the house in months to stand by at a Meth Lab BUST. It got to go because it normally employed as a Tanker in the North Country.
                  Fortunately for the IAFF the District has full taxing authority in NY and will get a new Dream Pumper, perhaps even with reclining seats and satellite TV. Then they can have better meetings on the way to assignments, like show up around 10ish and sit a block away.

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                  • #10
                    I don't know what an IAFF Chief is or how someone has an IAFF contract job as a chief and moves from job to job. No fire department I know of operates like that. Maybe our wires are crossed, but none of that makes any sense. Mind you, I've been an IAFF member for nearly 20 years and they have no impact on our contract or anyone else's. Not that I've ever heard of at least. It just doesn't work like that. It sounds like your locals up there suck.

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                    • #11
                      Tapered Pin huh?.........seems like a strange place for a tapered pin.......normally see a key-way and set screws in that application. As others have said if you can weld a nut to it perhaps a slide hammer and some heat will make it move..........sometimes even heat and penetrating oil or even bees wax works to break it loose. Is the cavity or pin open to the opposite side?..........tapered pins were used in some old lathes as shear pins and sometimes made from aluminum to break........rather than find a replacement a std shear pin will do the job.......just ream the hole to the final go no-go dimension and send it home.

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                      • #12
                        You need to vacation in NY and see the Wars.
                        We got Locals for Chiefs, Locals for Orficers and Locals for hose haulers. Minimally 2 Unions on every rig.

                        The Department who left the axle in the street is a City "Professional Department" that runs less than 100 calls a year for fire. 100% Union. 0 Vols.
                        The District they borrowed a fill in/replacement pumper from is a Vol company with about 25% IAFF Professionals. That District has had open warfare between Vols & IAFF for a couple years primarily over Vols who started & built the Company being deprived of equipment & training to the extent the Chief BANNED Vols from entering any burning structure. That blew up when the taxpayers learned the situation and the Chief handed his badge in.

                        More close to me, City of Rochester firemen maxes out at around 48 K without overtime. Firemen in Companies surrounding the City Start at 51k and bounce to around 78 in 4 years. City guys run 3 times the jobs, and Suburbans add BP and Child seat events into calls to make their stats better.

                        When this story lit up a week ago I called a truckie I know. He just passed 25 on the job, and owns his own septic tank business on the side. He still only gets to drive on fill in, cause other guys have seniority. He has been written up for checking oil, coolant and tires coming on shift, because that is a Mechanic job. All rigs cycle through the shop on a 2 week schedule and the Duty Mechanic responds to all second alarms to monitor oil pressure on rigs at the job.

                        My local Vol built company runs a 5 man Quint on tandem axles carrying 1000 gallons of water to every ambulance call.

                        You're absolutely right, THEY SUCK!

                        Cost of manpower is so high the City is browning out companies based on predictive dispatching.
                        I own 43 extinguishers for a reason.

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                        • #13
                          Goodness. That sort of silliness is why unions get a bad rap. And on top of it all, they're probably civil service.

                          It's rarely a good idea to mix full time guys and volunteers if at all possible. I get why some places do it, but it still is a recipe of trouble.

                          I would probably bar volunteers from going into a fire as well, after seeing the volunteers around my area, I absolutely would. Not saying there aren't some good guys in there because there is some. Volunteers make up the majority of what a lot of places consider to be "fire departments", somewhere in the ballpark of 80% or so. Yet they respond to less then 10% of the overall calls, nationwide, and still manage to account for 80% of the fire groups injuries and deaths. Not only that, en route to calls they wreck fire department and their personal vehicles exponentially more than career guys do. Those are hard numbers.

                          ....but having a local for the backend man, another one for the driver, another one for the captain....goodness. Every local has its problems, every department has its problems. I'm glad we don't have those problems here.

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