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330 a b/p HF Problem

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I think the foot pedal is an RFC-23a.

    Not cheap, even used. You can still get them new but it'll set you back some freedom bucks, probably close to $600. Used ones can be ok and they're fairly easy to rebuild, but still expensive.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Fantastic! Success is so sweet! Glad we could help.
    There may be machines made today that can weld like that one, but they sure won't be doing it when they're that old. There was some marvelous engineering done in this country back in those days, and so few people remain who appreciate it. "They just don't make 'em like that any more", Mostly because no one could afford to buy them at what they would cost today. I see the prices on them are starting to climb on ebay--I think the word is getting out.

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  • Jmcghee
    replied
    Welp, it looks like I’m up & running! I swapped the fuse out & spent the last couple hours putting it through its paces. Ran a bunch of beads on carbon steel with HF start, fussed around with the HF adjust & got it where I like it, and then ran a bunch of AC beads in continuous on aluminum, and it purred like a kitten the whole time. I don’t want to jinx it, but I think the combo of firing it up for the first time in years, and the absolutely filthy fuse holders was what blew that fuse.

    On a side note, what a fantastic machine! I’ve never had anything of this caliber before... kind of like driving a corvette for the first time

    Now to find a pedal, & get the cooler going. Thanks again everyone, this is such a fantastic resource!

    Leave a comment:


  • Jmcghee
    replied
    This one is a totally different style... it’s the sausage-shaped type that fits into copper “fingers” on either side. I grabbed two (an extra just in case today & will fuss with it tonight. I’ll keep you guys posted.

    BTW- thanks for everything, this place is great

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    All I could find at my local hardware store was the slow-blow type for houses. That's not what you want as I understand. I have five extras, so let me know if you can't track one down.

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  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Thank you! Now I get it. I have some of those. I was thinking of the little tubular glass or ceramic fuses like you see in an old car or old electronics equipment with the plastic cap fuseholder. I should have known those would lack the robustness needed for a machine like Helga! Those are hard to come by; most of the screw-in fuses still available have different ceramic base sizes for different amperages that fit into Edison-base adapters that have to be screwed into home fuseboxes. The goal was to prevent people from putting a 30 amp fuse (or a penny) in place of a 15-amp fuse and burning down their houses.

    Jmcghee, if you can't find the ones like Ryan has, you can get the adapters at an electrical supply house and then the "new" ceramic base fuses will work. I assume you are not a purist trying to retain "antique value" on your welder--once installed, those adapters cannot be removed without destroying the socket. Just be sure you get the adapter for the right amperage fuse.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Check 'em out.
    Attached Files

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Found 'em!
    Attached Files

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Gave me a good zap when I was testing it too. Guess I was touching something I wasn't supposed to and then touched the radio chassis. Felt like 60hz at least. Ya see, back in the days of this radio, the manufacturer didn't expect a ding dong like me to be sticking his grubby mitts in there and fiddling around, so there aren't warning signs every half inch. The only thing I couldn't get working was the light. I also didn't try to get the light working. It's not just a light bulb though and I wasn't interested in messing with it.

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  • Aeronca41
    replied
    That's a nice-looking old timer. You must know something about electronics if you got it running. And it's far better entertainment than the business end of a plasma cutter!

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I'll try and remember to take a picture. They are fast blow, comprised of glass, metal and probably ceramic. And they came in the original box like you used to see on the shelf at the old school hardware stores.

    This is my highest level of electronics repair...on my own at least. It's a 1960-70s(?) radio that adorns a shelf on my shop and is my sole means of entertainment while I'm working...outside of me hurting myself of course. Got her back up and running.
    Attached Files

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  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Hah-- I'm no techno-genius--just an old guy who's been through the school of hard knocks (and a few zaps--those ones from HF in radars are nasty!) over a lot of years. I'd like to know more about those fuses--I only know of regular (fast) blow and slo-blo. What are these yellow ones? Are they glass or ceramic? Please post a pic of the fuse and the box if you can.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Don't use a typical slow-blow fuse from the hardware store. It should be a yellow in color fuse. I bought a new old stock box on eBay a few ago. It was from the 70s I think. I have four or six spares. These fuses were hard for me to find. I'm not an electro-technico-super genius like Wayne, so I have no idea where to look for such a creature, but I got lucky on fleabay.

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  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Good find! I think the fan thing is just a mistake on the diagram as I said last night. Everyone makes a mistake now and then. Hope it doesn’t just blow the fuse again.

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  • Jmcghee
    replied
    Well after an unreasonable amount of searching, I finally found the fuse (more or less exactly opposite of the switches/HF in the back bottom of the machine) and sure enough, that one is blown. This was my first time taking that side panel off, and it’s waaay dirtier than the other side. There’s a fine dust that appears to be rubber, coating pretty much everything including the fuse holders. My hope is that’s what the problem was... I shop vac’d/blew everything out with compressed air & wiped it down the best I could. I’ll grab a fuse tomorrow and hopefully be up & running.

    On the fan circuit- the fan has run throughout this process, and still runs with the fuse removed, so it definitely doesn’t seem to get power from the same place.

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