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Remove Slag Chemically

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  • Remove Slag Chemically

    Hey y’all

    Has anybody had any success removing slag chemically? I’m using 6011, 7014, and 7018 rods.

    I’m working in some super small areas, and I can’t quite get in the tightest corners. 7014 and 7018 are easier, but 6011, oof.

    Would be great to let this stuff sit in vinegar for a while. Even just to make it easier to knock off.

    Any tips are appreciated!

    Tony

  • #2
    You might want to read up on graphitic softening of iron and steel before exposing iron to things like vinegar, actually particularly vinegar.

    Slag falls close to glass or ceramic on the scale of things and will be Base in nature. Acids generally won't touch it though.

    Chipping, grinding or media blasting will. Steel grit can be your friend most days, unless you're the guy running the blaster.

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    • #3
      You know Tony, the problem could be your welding to cold, the polarity when using DC as well has an effect. So does arc length. And if it is a real issue, switch processes. Solid wire GMAW.

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      • #4
        Invest in a needle scaler.
        www.silvercreekwelding.com

        Miller Trailblazer 325 efi
        Miller extreme 12vs
        Thermal arc 186 ac/dc
        Lincoln power wave 455m/stt with 10m dual feeder

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        • #5
          I had tight area to get into and knock 6010 slag off earlier today. I used a spring loaded center punch and a pick. Worked pretty well.

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          • #6
            Weld hotter and slower. Slag inclusions, particularly at the toes with 6010/11 ("wagon tracks") are a good sign of welding too cold and/or too fast. Let the puddle fill those gouged-out areas and the slag will come off a lot easier.

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            • #7
              Thanks everyone! Looks like the answer is NO.

              Tony

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              • #8
                Generally speaking, we don't do short answers very well; and there's a really good chance that this thread ends up on some obscure topic having nothing to do with slag removal...or even welding.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ajherhold View Post
                  Thanks everyone! Looks like the answer is NO.

                  Tony
                  NO does appear to be your answer. However...as previously mentioned, slag is more easily removed if the weld is smooth on the surface and blended on the edges (toes) to the base material. Improve that and worst of the cleanup is done for you.
                  That said, if it was heat that melted it, it will take heat to re melt it. A torch and low O2 pressure can wash it away if thought is give to avoiding melting everything else when doing so. The needle scaler, air chipper, carbide tooling will be the less risky approaches however to weld clean up, and the smart money will be improving the weld itself.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Helios View Post
                    Weld hotter and slower. Slag inclusions, particularly at the toes with 6010/11 ("wagon tracks") are a good sign of welding too cold and/or too fast. Let the puddle fill those gouged-out areas and the slag will come off a lot easier.
                    Thanks Helios. Yeah, I know exactly what you’re talking about here with those “wagon tracks.”

                    I’ve been brazing and torch welding for years. Just been stick welding for a few months now. Still hard to get over the tendency to move too quick through the weld.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Willvis View Post
                      Invest in a needle scaler.
                      x2. Needle scalers, especially the smaller models, will get in just about anywhere. They are also handy for peening welds when the need arises :-)

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