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  • Help with mig setting

    Hey all!

    its been a few years since I’ve been here. I had gotten pretty good at welding silverware (really stainless steel)into art. Unfortunately I stopped doing it for about two years and just recently decided to get into it again.

    Today I geared up (safety first) and got my pieces ready. But good grief! I cannot remember my settings. Pop pop pop! I did a ton of reading and thought I got a handle on it , but no matter what setting, pop pop pop! Ugh!

    I did upgrade the grounding clamp before today since the other seemed cheap that came with the welder.

    But something I noticed is that I am really low, maybe even out of shielding gas. I use argon/co2.

    Before I stopped welding 2 years ago, I don’t recall having this much trouble with popping! Is the increased popping due to low/no shielding gas?

    Also, Can anyone one recommend a good start for stainless steel flat wear ? I make dragonfly’s out of the cut up butterknives.

    Thanks in advance!
    Jessica

  • #2
    Turn up the WFS.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
      Turn up the WFS.
      Ok. I was at 80 WFS, 4 on voltage. Still was popping. I was everywhere with those dials. I’m using a Hobart 125 handler btw.

      Comment


      • #4
        80 ipm?

        Make sure you have a good ground.

        What size wire and what material
        Thickness are you welding?

        Comment


        • #5
          Change the gas...........doesn't last forever........Argon by itself will also loose it's effectiveness if it's old and the tank pressure is low...I never run them dry.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have, but by accident. Welding along, having a good time, minding my own business....when all of a sudden, everything starts going el-nuts-o (that's Spanish for "bad"). Of course, in the middle of the job, tools laying everywhere....that's when I decided to implement my "emergency backup/I'm-an-idiot spare cylinder plan".

            That's the official title of it too...

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
              80 ipm?

              Make sure you have a good ground.

              What size wire and what material
              Thickness are you welding?
              This is what drives me batty, how to read the WFS. I had it on 80 on the WFS dial, which I think may be actually somewhere around 400 ipm? I think that the Hobart 125 Handler is 500 ipm at max IPM, but I havne't been able to figure that out officially.

              I am using .024 wire, not stainless because I so other types of welding, and most the welds get concealed. The thickness I would suppose is more than an 1/8, because I am welding a cut butterknife which is a little less than 1/8 inch, onto a butterknife handle, which can be maybe 3/16 at times? I've been able to successfully weld the cut knife part to the handle in the past.

              Pretty sure the ground is good, bought a new ground clamp to replace the one that came with the welder.

              I think I may have the WFS too high... but, I also am thinking the gas was an issue. This morning I was thinking about the setting on the output, set to below 10... I bet when I pressed that trigger it was probably more like 6-7. Plus the bottle is super low.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                I have, but by accident. Welding along, having a good time, minding my own business....when all of a sudden, everything starts going el-nuts-o (that's Spanish for "bad"). Of course, in the middle of the job, tools laying everywhere....that's when I decided to implement my "emergency backup/I'm-an-idiot spare cylinder plan".

                That's the official title of it too...
                LMAO I love it!
                I think I may have the WFS too high... but, I also am thinking the gas was an issue. This morning I was thinking about the setting on the output, set to below 10... I bet when I pressed that trigger it was probably more like 6-7. Plus the bottle is super low.

                Comment


                • #9
                  400 ipm is far too high for that application I'd think.

                  To tell your true wfs, get a stop watch, pull the trigger on the gun and hit starts...go to 6 seconds and let go...measure the length of wire now sticking out of the gun and multiply by 10...bingo-bango, instant wfs calculator.

                  Are you running mild steel wire or a 308 stainless?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Pencil, paper, tape measure, timepiece with a second hand. Isolate your work cable. Make yourself a chart. Clip wire to tip, pull trigger 6 seconds or 10 seconds, measure. multiply by 10 or 6 respectively = WFS. Do a few different settings, you can probably develop a curve.

                    ---Meltedmetal
                    ---Meltedmetal

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If you can feel the wire bouncing off the base metal, then yes, your wire is smoking hot fast. If you slow it down and it keeps burning back up to the tip, sounding like it's surging, then it's too slow.

                      I would guess, depending on the type of welding wire, i.e., stainless or mild steel, that your volts should be down around 18ish. I can't see it be any higher than 20 and as low as 15, to be perfectly honest.

                      For such small stuff, you should learn to tig weld.

                      Got any pictures of whatever it is you're welding that you can post up?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                        If you can feel the wire bouncing off the base metal, then yes, your wire is smoking hot fast. If you slow it down and it keeps burning back up to the tip, sounding like it's surging, then it's too slow.

                        I would guess, depending on the type of welding wire, i.e., stainless or mild steel, that your volts should be down around 18ish. I can't see it be any higher than 20 and as low as 15, to be perfectly honest.

                        For such small stuff, you should learn to tig weld.

                        Got any pictures of whatever it is you're welding that you can post up?
                        Can you explain how you get to 18? My hobart 125 has a volt switch that goes 1-4 and i'm not sure how that works into Volts. I'll look in the manual again but I swear I didn't see that or the wire speed 1-100 actual ips.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          That's not 1-100 ipm, it's a percentage of its speed between its slowest and highest speed.

                          Sounds like you have tapped voltage, so just start at 2 and 50 and adjust it from there up or down.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                            If you can feel the wire bouncing off the base metal, then yes, your wire is smoking hot fast. If you slow it down and it keeps burning back up to the tip, sounding like it's surging, then it's too slow.

                            I would guess, depending on the type of welding wire, i.e., stainless or mild steel, that your volts should be down around 18ish. I can't see it be any higher than 20 and as low as 15, to be perfectly honest.

                            For such small stuff, you should learn to tig weld.

                            Got any pictures of whatever it is you're welding that you can post up?

                            this is what I did in 2016 and what I’m attempting to do again.

                            Click image for larger version

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                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Quick & dirty rule of thumb with tapped machines like the 125 Hobart is to set the wire speed at the same setting you have the "V" set at and work up or down on the wire speed to get the deposit you desire. Tap 2V put the wire on 20 and drop back from there.
                              DO NOT ADJUST WIRE SPEED WHILE WELDING! The machine won't like that.

                              With that machine your settings will vary depending on distance from the breaker box. Be aware of that and save yourself frustration.

                              Also if you're running 309ss wire rather than E70S6 steel wire you need 100% Argon, not mixed gas. E70S6 will run fine on Co2 for what you're doing.
                              If you use straight Co2 have the welding supply store your regulator is Co2 compatable. Hobart sold truckloads of regulators for C-25 that will corrode with straight Co2.

                              Also I suggest abundant caution with those knife handles. Many of them have a foam core, and welding directly on the handle can cause it to blow up when the foam outgasses from heat.

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