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  • #16
    Originally posted by Noel View Post
    Remember when clear lenses were made out of glass? Standard size, fits all. Cheap to buy, companies handed them out to welders. Then someone lost an eye? Ruined everything?
    You can still find them. The clear glass lenses with a glass filter lens is awesome for tig work. The clearity is so much better, its like welding in HD. The problem is if you do any grinding the sparks inbed into the glass. That and the losing an eye thing I guess
    www.silvercreekwelding.com

    Miller Trailblazer 325 efi
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    Thermal arc 186 ac/dc
    Lincoln power wave 455m/stt with 10m dual feeder

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Oversig View Post
      Replacing my lens covers both inside & outside covers are running into real money.
      What auto darkening Welding helmet has the cheapest replacement Lenses????

      Upkeep should be considered when purchasing anything that requires ongoing replacement costs to use.
      Aren't all lens covers the same two sizes? Seems like all my shields, no matter who makes them, use one of two sizes, either 2″ x 4¼” or 4½” x 5¼”.
      Last edited by Helios; 04-21-2019, 07:26 AM.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Helios View Post

        Aren't all lens covers the same two sizes? Seems like all my shields, no matter who makes them, use one of two sizes...
        Nope. Every brand and model auto dark uses different lenses. Some are $50 a pack. Crazy huh. I got over 15 years with 2 large glass covers in my old big window Jackson which i still have. Just wipe them with lacquer thinner and go on. I didn't get a Miller auto dark until 10 years ago. And i didn't wear it everyday as some days it was raining and i didn't want it wet so the old jackson came back out...Bob
        Bob Wright

        Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
        http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Willvis View Post

          Jeez. Sometimes I would replace them once a day. I've gone as far as replacing them a few times a day if I was welding 30" pipe in position or something like that. Its not the smoke so much as the grinding.
          I never ever used mine for grinding so that added some life. I always used a face shield for that. I saw guys with $400 helments just plastering it with sparks...Bob
          Bob Wright

          Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
          http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

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          • #20
            I use my flip window fibre metal for grinding all the time. I believe the last time I ordered a box, I paid around $1.50 per lens cover for it so at that cost, I don’t care.
            Lincoln Idealarc 250
            Miller Bobcat 250
            Thermal Arc Hefty 2 feeder
            Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52
            Torchmate CNC table

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            • #21
              Whoever came up with that "grind" setting on autodark helmets probably became a millionare from royalties & bonuses on splatter lenses if he was smart enough to file paperwork on the idea.
              The guy who came up with helmets that look like something from the bar on Starship Enterprize is richer. I ain't even going to address people who pay a couple hundred on airbrushed graphics on a helmet.

              I've had a 23 pound flipper since the 70s for real tight locations, and will still choke anybody who grinds wearing that helmet.

              You can soak the smoke off most plastics with 50/50 Simple Green & water. Add some Oxyclean and the process speeds up. Nothing is going to clean grinding impingements off. If you can find one of the home oxygen concentrators nobody is using, set your soak tank up with that like it's a fish tank.
              Working in a shop that has Oxygen Dewars, route the vent flow thru your soak tank. Plastics love Oxygen.

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              • #22
                I used to be the worst.
                I had real bad habits from always using my old standard helmet. Plus I had a lot of just plain bad habits too.
                When auto darks came out I thought it was the most cool thing ever. I had to have one. When I as mobile doing tig aluminum I took everything under the sun to the job, and had it all out at once.
                I had a habit of taking my helmet off and laying it behind where I was working.....along with everything else. (that was when crouched down welding on a skeg)
                One time I reached back around and picked it up I brought back my tig torch with it. Melted through the cover lens into the main auto dark part.
                Another time I simply stepped right into it and wasted the head gear.
                I let the outboard motor down once and poured the exhaust water from the prop directly into it.
                If you need it dead I can kill it for ya

                www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
                Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
                MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
                Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
                Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

                Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
                Miller 30-A Spoolgun
                Miller WC-115-A
                Miller Spectrum 300
                Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
                Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

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                • #23
                  Just dang FK. You do bring back a number of joyous memories. Ol Ted at the LWS flat refused to sell me an auto when they were around $975 a copy, even though I did understand how the contraption functioned turning liquid crystals on and off. Ted even offered to fire his son if he sold me one. I had a reputation by then for finding defects & shortcomings.

                  You also bring to mind those good old wood boxes with attached rope for draggin the toys to the work, sitting on and occasionally standing on. 3 different seating heights, space for spare gloves, lunch and a thermous along with some rod and a big plastic bag to sorta keep dry. Magnificent contrivance those boxes were. Lot of guys became half proficient at cutting and fastening wood making them as well. I know I lamented vegetables transitioning to shipping in cardboard and the loss of all those fine free crate slats that could be cut & glued up.

                  Probably don't see em any more cause no manufacturer can make a buck selling boxes to gullible customers. Plastic might catch fire and burn to the ground too.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Franz© View Post
                    Just dang FK. You do bring back a number of joyous memories. Ol Ted at the LWS flat refused to sell me an auto when they were around $975 a copy, even though I did understand how the contraption functioned turning liquid crystals on and off. Ted even offered to fire his son if he sold me one. I had a reputation by then for finding defects & shortcomings.

                    You also bring to mind those good old wood boxes with attached rope for draggin the toys to the work, sitting on and occasionally standing on. 3 different seating heights, space for spare gloves, lunch and a thermous along with some rod and a big plastic bag to sorta keep dry. Magnificent contrivance those boxes were. Lot of guys became half proficient at cutting and fastening wood making them as well. I know I lamented vegetables transitioning to shipping in cardboard and the loss of all those fine free crate slats that could be cut & glued up.

                    Probably don't see em any more cause no manufacturer can make a buck selling boxes to gullible customers. Plastic might catch fire and burn to the ground too.
                    OMG
                    I have only a clue about what you are describing.....Can you post a photo or something?
                    Is it sorta like the footstool/toolboxes they sell today?

                    www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
                    Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
                    MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
                    Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
                    Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

                    Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
                    Miller 30-A Spoolgun
                    Miller WC-115-A
                    Miller Spectrum 300
                    Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
                    Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

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                    • #25
                      Pictures, back then state of the art was called Polaroid. I could probably slap one together in a couple hours but I have no idea where I'd find 1/8 x 3 wood slats since American Excelsior's warehouse burned real fast I might add, and the world switched to coated corrugated and styrofoam peanuts arrived to replace popcorn.

                      Other than a bit of tricky jointery to accommodate the wood raw material, boxes were just the follow on for wood beer crates from the 1940s. Those got real hard to come by in the 50s, so weldors being weldors made their own.
                      Back then plywood was still pretty much figuring itself out and trying to find market, and a lot of things from nails to dead chicken came in wood packaging. 1/8 thick crate slats were plentiful and often free. You could also score true 3/4 quality lumber from shipping crates. so that became the building material of choice.

                      You can build a good box with little more than a hammer, nails, glue and a skillsaw, but a table saw makes it much easier. I liked the dimensions 14 x 16 x 20 myself, I got long legs and figured if I got to sit I wanted maximum comfort.
                      To increase life of the box I preferred to grab a couple hardwood pallet boards for the long elements of the bottom exoskeliton to act as runners getting dragged across concrete.
                      Top is a little tricky too, you want it recessed so there is no sliver to the but potential. After all you don't want to be gimping around looking for somebody to pull a spear out of your rump.

                      For a fellow spending a lot of time around boats, you might want to consider aluminum panels and aluminum angle for the frame. Line the inside with Homosote and you got a nice box that ain't available at Homer Desperate or Horrible Fright.

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                      • #26
                        **** in the time I took to make that I could get something done out of the giant backlog of jobs we have here.
                        I just like to see what other people do/did back in the day.
                        I'm addicted to Harbor Freight and Menards (and Miller)

                        www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
                        Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
                        MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
                        Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
                        Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

                        Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
                        Miller 30-A Spoolgun
                        Miller WC-115-A
                        Miller Spectrum 300
                        Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
                        Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I wish we had menards down here.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                            I wish we had menards down here.
                            I'm guessing it's a home improvement store??
                            Richard

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                            • #29
                              It's more of a home amazing store.

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                              • #30
                                Until 10-15 years back there was an annual O/A pipe welding contest sponsored by ?302? as I recall. The contest prize was a new pickup, and the contest had been around since at least 1950. The last few years it pretty much boiled down to which of 3 men wanted the new pickup so the Union terminated the event. Another skill set began a rapid death, today I doubt you can find a man in the US who can O/A weld 4" pipe to code.

                                Granted O/A has pretty much been replaced in the marketplace, but the skills should still be known, especially to people learning to weld. If nothing else O/A is a valuable learning tool for someone learning puddle behavior in the TIG process.

                                Someplace in my piles of things somebody will send to the landfill when I'm dead is a picture of a mule drawn wagon with a gas drive generator on the wagon and a weldor welding a joint on a gas line circa 1938. That weldor had skills I'll never posses, knew things I'll never know, and quite probably reached retirement running Fleetweld 5. In 1936-7 John Catternacht and John Odenbach developed a process to build ship hulls

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