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  • Franz©
    started a topic Cylinder question

    Cylinder question

    Do you use cylinders smaller than 120cf for welding gases? Oxygen, Argon, Helium, Hydrogen, Acetylene, Co2, Mixed gas?

  • breavis
    replied
    I keep a 40 cf tank of c25 as a backup. Although I'm a hobbyist, I've got to where I use a 150cf tank of c25 and argon, but I understand the folks who have a small welder for once in a while repairs don't need a big tank.

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  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by Franz© View Post
    Nice to see someone who understands the power of plastic and additional stability of the 5 spoked divorced transfer case support system over the traditional metal 4 spoke base.
    Yea we have about three junk chairs made into welding stools like that.
    5 spoke rules. 4 spoke will dump yer butt out on the floor!!

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  • Franz©
    replied
    Nice to see someone who understands the power of plastic and additional stability of the 5 spoked divorced transfer case support system over the traditional metal 4 spoke base.

    Leave a comment:


  • sledsports
    replied
    You can see how many I have here Click image for larger version

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    Leave a comment:


  • sledsports
    replied
    I use a lot of oxy/fuel. I do not recommend the small cylinders I keep 6 338cf oxygen and 3 of the big acetelene 3 argon, 2 98/2 , 1 75/25, 2 helium, and 2 trimix.

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  • Franz©
    replied
    I wasn't going here when I asked about cylinder sizes, but since the subject of lifting and carrying them lovely things came up; I'll mention that I am as close to rockin chair lazy as a man can be when it comes to moving cylinders. I got no problem whatsoever sittin and watchin somebody else move them. Occasionally however I do have to move one, and in that pursuit I invented/designed/stuck together this little device called dam thang. Name came from people asking why I hadn't invented the dam thang 30 years before.




    This one is on a 122 cylinder. Install is quick and simple, place, strap and ratchet tight. Works a whole lot better than a cylinder cart too.




    As time went on some ungrateful people complained it needed a handle on the valve end. OK. Grab a cap, quick cut across the top with the plasma cutter or zip disk, 3 pieces of 1/8 pipe to complete the hinge, pin the hinge and finish cutting the cap. Weld on 4 chain links with bolts in place, and it clamps on the cylinder threads real tight. Quick & dirty handle welded on and some rattle can.


    Click image for larger version

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    Before you build them I should warn that both devices evaporate faster than SnapOn tools from an unlocked box. Both pieces can be chained and padlocked, but in a welding shop generally all you'll find is a cut chain if you're lucky. Probably not OSHA approved, which explains why it works.

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  • aametalmaster
    replied
    we filled small cylinders everyday when i was at the LWS. Filled from 6 or 12 300CF bottles and a hose like what Noel posted. Never bled them just hook up and go slow. The 300 cf were hooked together in series and just crack one from lowest psi on the 6 and go. Then close the first one and open the 2nd one up the line until you get the pressure...Bob

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  • Franz©
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Ha! They won't sell me the good stuff. I haven't tasted it, but they say there's some sort of additive to it so people don't huff the nitrous. The good stuff they call dental grade.
    Somebody NOT telling you truth.
    How could such a practice happen in the welding supply industry? Especially the gas end of the business?

    Maybe it's just a rumor they started to keep the fill crew awake.

    Threaten to hijack a whipped cream truck.

    Better yet, pipe some into the opponent's pit and see if the crew gets silly.

    N2O had no additives other than perhaps iron from a crappy cylinder.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Ha! They won't sell me the good stuff. I haven't tasted it, but they say there's some sort of additive to it so people don't huff the nitrous. The good stuff they call dental grade.

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    Transfill or drifting gas and bleeder -v- hose connection bleeding is a whole subject unto itself. On low pressure gases such as Co2 I advise against hose bleeding particularly if the connevtion you are bleeding thru has an O ring. Bleeding at the fitting causes erosion. On Propane, the need to bleed isn't really there if you take advantage of the liquid in the hose when you begin to connect. If you do screw up an O ring, you'll know fairly quick. Just change the ring. In both cases you're moving liquid.

    HP gases are a slightly more complex issue. The flowing gas itself can cut you and it won't be fun.
    It helps a lot if you understand the properties of the gas you're moving.
    It gets to be more fun when you're cascading the fill, or when somebody "needs" the fill fast. My favorite places are called Bob's bait, tackle, paintball and welding gas filling. Bob can get you in and out in 10 minutes with a hotshotted cylinder holding about 1/4 to 1/2 of the gas he sold you.

    Ryan, I don't understand the situation with Nitrous. Are you falling asleep?

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    A bleeder is a good idea. I have, but I've rarely used it for welding gases until I got nitrous for the drag car, now it's used all the time. But that's a whole other story.

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  • Noel
    replied
    Originally posted by Willvis View Post
    Noel Shouldn't you have a Tee on there with a valve to purge the hose before filling?
    I crack the large cylinder with the hose attached and tightened, bleed the hose loosely attached to the smaller cylinder and when purged tighten to the small cylinder valve before opening.

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  • Willvis
    replied
    Noel Shouldn't you have a Tee on there with a valve to purge the hose before filling?

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  • MMW
    replied
    I made an adapter to fill oxy bottles. I use a 3000# tee with a gauge in one port, and two adapters to fit the bottles. Just crack the valves and let it transfer slow as to fast will build up a lot of heat. No hoses I just lay bottles next to each other on the ground. Haven't used it in years but used to fill a 20cf when I had to lug it somewhere my hoses wouldn't reach.

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