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  • Cylinder question

    Do you use cylinders smaller than 120cf for welding gases? Oxygen, Argon, Helium, Hydrogen, Acetylene, Co2, Mixed gas?

  • #2
    I don't
    Richard

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    • #3
      TIG / Argon is my biggest use especially for aluminum.......I have two 330 cf bottles and a backup 150 cf..........
      Oxy / Acety both are 125 cf.
      MIG./ CO2/Argon 140 cf

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      • #4
        I use mostly S cylinders, which I think are 125cf. I only use them because it's easier for me to carry them back and forth from my shop to my Jeep when I get refills. But I keep three argon, two C25, then a have two smaller cylinders, one with helium and one with Tri-mix. I also have two RR cylinders, one with argon and one with c25, both for extra backup emergency oops moments and for portable work.

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        • #5
          People do everyday. But they cost more...Bob
          Bob Wright

          Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
          http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

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          • #6
            By me you can't own anything bigger than a 125 although if you already have larger you are grandfathered in. I use 250/330 in the shop and 125 for road work. Acetylene is 145 on the road and the big ones in the shop. I've been lucky to acquire plenty of cylinders over the years so I pay no rental fees. This is where it pays to have a good relationship with your lws as you can turn in out of date cylinders that you find at garage sales with no charge as they just swap it out.
            MM250
            Trailblazer 250g
            22a feeder
            Lincoln ac/dc 225
            Victor O/A
            MM200 black face
            Whitney 30 ton hydraulic punch
            Lown 1/8x 36" power roller
            Arco roto-phase model M
            Vectrax 7x12 band saw
            Miller spectrum 875
            30a spoolgun w/wc-24
            Syncrowave 250
            RCCS-14

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            • #7
              I have them all
              It just depends on what I'm gonna do.
              I like the real small ones to pack down long steps to the water (or actually back up)
              I like my 300s in the shop for argon on aluminum and stainless
              I like my 180s for mixes I seldom use like 75/25 on steel

              www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
              Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
              MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
              Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
              Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

              Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
              Miller 30-A Spoolgun
              Miller WC-115-A
              Miller Spectrum 300
              Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
              Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

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              • #8
                I'd like to make an adapter thing to fill my 80 cf cylinder from the big one. It would be so much easier to throw on the truck for mobile work.
                www.silvercreekwelding.com

                Miller Trailblazer 325 efi
                Miller extreme 12vs
                Thermal arc 186 ac/dc
                Lincoln power wave 455m/stt with 10m dual feeder

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                • #9
                  I'm going to raise a hand, I do use small cylinders, and decanter from a large 75/25 to fill them. Click image for larger version

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                  • #10
                    I made an adapter to fill oxy bottles. I use a 3000# tee with a gauge in one port, and two adapters to fit the bottles. Just crack the valves and let it transfer slow as to fast will build up a lot of heat. No hoses I just lay bottles next to each other on the ground. Haven't used it in years but used to fill a 20cf when I had to lug it somewhere my hoses wouldn't reach.
                    MM250
                    Trailblazer 250g
                    22a feeder
                    Lincoln ac/dc 225
                    Victor O/A
                    MM200 black face
                    Whitney 30 ton hydraulic punch
                    Lown 1/8x 36" power roller
                    Arco roto-phase model M
                    Vectrax 7x12 band saw
                    Miller spectrum 875
                    30a spoolgun w/wc-24
                    Syncrowave 250
                    RCCS-14

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Noel Shouldn't you have a Tee on there with a valve to purge the hose before filling?
                      www.silvercreekwelding.com

                      Miller Trailblazer 325 efi
                      Miller extreme 12vs
                      Thermal arc 186 ac/dc
                      Lincoln power wave 455m/stt with 10m dual feeder

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Willvis View Post
                        Noel Shouldn't you have a Tee on there with a valve to purge the hose before filling?
                        I crack the large cylinder with the hose attached and tightened, bleed the hose loosely attached to the smaller cylinder and when purged tighten to the small cylinder valve before opening.

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                        • #13
                          A bleeder is a good idea. I have, but I've rarely used it for welding gases until I got nitrous for the drag car, now it's used all the time. But that's a whole other story.

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                          • #14
                            Transfill or drifting gas and bleeder -v- hose connection bleeding is a whole subject unto itself. On low pressure gases such as Co2 I advise against hose bleeding particularly if the connevtion you are bleeding thru has an O ring. Bleeding at the fitting causes erosion. On Propane, the need to bleed isn't really there if you take advantage of the liquid in the hose when you begin to connect. If you do screw up an O ring, you'll know fairly quick. Just change the ring. In both cases you're moving liquid.

                            HP gases are a slightly more complex issue. The flowing gas itself can cut you and it won't be fun.
                            It helps a lot if you understand the properties of the gas you're moving.
                            It gets to be more fun when you're cascading the fill, or when somebody "needs" the fill fast. My favorite places are called Bob's bait, tackle, paintball and welding gas filling. Bob can get you in and out in 10 minutes with a hotshotted cylinder holding about 1/4 to 1/2 of the gas he sold you.

                            Ryan, I don't understand the situation with Nitrous. Are you falling asleep?

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                            • #15
                              Ha! They won't sell me the good stuff. I haven't tasted it, but they say there's some sort of additive to it so people don't huff the nitrous. The good stuff they call dental grade.

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