Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Shop/Mobile welding

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Walker Hum
    started a topic Shop/Mobile welding

    Shop/Mobile welding

    Hey all, Im new to the boards here. After a little searching, I've come to ask for some help/advice. I'm starting up a shop/mobile welding company and trying to figure out what machines to get. I have a Diversion 180 and a Mig 140 currently and trying to figure out what to add for the mobile side is driving me in circles.
    Bobcat 225? 250? And keep my current shop setup?
    Fusion 160 and transfer my Tig/Mig between truck and shop?
    Multimatic 220? ____ Generator?

    I'm just starting out with the business and hoping to grow it into my full time job, I want a setup that is sustainable for growing with, but not an unlimited budget. Any thoughts and tips on what direction to go with it?

    Thanks,
    Walker

  • tarry99
    replied
    Originally posted by FusionKing View Post

    Boy ain't that the truth!!
    The part about you and only you.....that pretty much nails it.
    There is no doubt as long as I have my reputation, I have a job.

    One of my favorite things I like to repeatedly rattle off to my people is about wisdom. You can't get it from books. There is a big difference between wisdom and knowledge. When I was much younger I always hung around the old guys in the shop. Later I even hired a few.
    I believe wisdom comes from making mistakes. learning what NOT to do...and hopefully being able to apply it down the path to rewards.
    I have a lot of scars. Some from play but mostly work. They don't hurt much. but they serve as reminders. I have made a few big mistakes financially as well. Taking too much risk at the wrong times. Timing, skill, money and risk all have to work together at some point to move forward in business.
    It sounds as if we have both been educated at the "School of hard knocks" and not to say that in a bad way either........as you have correctly stated.....education is wisdom and what you do with that rare commodity may very well unknowingly set your path in life dealing with the Risk vs Reward syndrome ..........

    As a young poor kid I was fortunate to have been exposed to many interesting things and career paths along with being around many individuals that on the surface seemed to be successful...although some of these older dudes were pretty crude and so it took some time to wade through the fodder and isolate what might really be of help to me............but as life transitions you quickly learn that success can have different meanings to some and come in many flavors.....it's navigating those ups & downs that put you in a better position to engage more so in the up's rather than the alternative.......

    I've had a good ride in the business world and the rewards have been many so no regrets......
    Last edited by tarry99; 04-11-2019, 09:52 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by Willvis View Post

    That's the biggest thing isn't it. I hope I never have to go back to working for someone else. Especially in industrial plants where you can't move a finger without breaking at least 10 "safety" rules
    Boy I hear you. I try to make sure that the only person here who has to do something really dangerous is me. Once you get a good employee you want to keep them alive!

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by tarry99 View Post

    Very well stated Fusion...........and from what I read , it pretty much says , "There are no Free Rides" until you pay your dues and work at a few careers gaining much knowledge along the way before success or direction will ever be within reach.......as success can't be bought , or chosen , nor does it come easily or quickly!...........

    Self Employment is a 24/7 job as there is always something to do..... Whether your a 1 man shop or have a few dozen employees the responsibility is similar but at different levels , Your going to miss some engagements or maybe your kids baseball practice and a few other things that your friends who have nothing well say "I would never do that" ............

    "Self employment is not for everyone" It may sound glamorous to some until you talk with them about needing to live off your bank account , or needing to work on a piece of broken equipment tonight that I need in the AM or Workers Comp rates or General or Excess liability insurance or a claims meeting where your next step in order to get paid may be to file a claim against the General contractors bond....or Regulations which amount to so many you need a ringed binder to manage them , so If you don't have any money saved or need a paycheck weekly or lack the desire to further educate yourself or the Drive to exceed , you probably need to stay where you are until you do......

    Not to say that you cannot have a little business on the side....while still working full time.........that works for many and can be a springboard eventually to Self Employment............

    Knowledge , creativity , problem solving & education in your field & Drive is what propels you beyond the competition and makes your phone ring while the competition sits Idle..........It's all about you & only you....and not your fancy Truck or shinny Equipment.........

    For all extensive purposes........People do business with people.......meaning if your not in-touch with your clientele or hearing what there saying or solving there problems.......your worth to them will drop like a bad habit! ...............It's a tough game , that requires the owner to be a leader & problem solver most of the time , a Missionary some times , compassionate other times , and a person that can interact with anyone in business as long as you can hold your own in your field of expertise......

    And the Rewards if successful can be many..........


    Been self employed most of my life , while also employed consulting w/ perks in a parallel field at the same time.....which I recently gave up the consulting portion after 32 years...people ask me when am I going to retire?.......and I always say I have been retired for decades , you just never noticed!

    Boy ain't that the truth!!
    The part about you and only you.....that pretty much nails it.
    There is no doubt as long as I have my reputation, I have a job.

    One of my favorite things I like to repeatedly rattle off to my people is about wisdom. You can't get it from books. There is a big difference between wisdom and knowledge. When I was much younger I always hung around the old guys in the shop. Later I even hired a few.
    I believe wisdom comes from making mistakes. learning what NOT to do...and hopefully being able to apply it down the path to rewards.
    I have a lot of scars. Some from play but mostly work. They don't hurt much. but they serve as reminders. I have made a few big mistakes financially as well. Taking too much risk at the wrong times. Timing, skill, money and risk all have to work together at some point to move forward in business.

    Leave a comment:


  • tarry99
    replied
    Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
    I've seen great welders who were poor business men. They stayed poor
    I welded on tractors, bulldozers, chairs, a helicopter, race cars, new construction, handrails etc.
    Steel, aluminum, cast iron and stainless.
    I was a machinist in the Army and had two automotive machine shops, a muffler shop and an auto parts store.
    Finding your specialty/niche is the main key to success if you can manage your money at the same time.
    Very well stated Fusion...........and from what I read , it pretty much says , "There are no Free Rides" until you pay your dues and work at a few careers gaining much knowledge along the way before success or direction will ever be within reach.......as success can't be bought , or chosen , nor does it come easily or quickly!...........

    Self Employment is a 24/7 job as there is always something to do..... Whether your a 1 man shop or have a few dozen employees the responsibility is similar but at different levels , Your going to miss some engagements or maybe your kids baseball practice and a few other things that your friends who have nothing well say "I would never do that" ............

    "Self employment is not for everyone" It may sound glamorous to some until you talk with them about needing to live off your bank account , or needing to work on a piece of broken equipment tonight that I need in the AM or Workers Comp rates or General or Excess liability insurance or a claims meeting where your next step in order to get paid may be to file a claim against the General contractors bond....or Regulations which amount to so many you need a ringed binder to manage them , so If you don't have any money saved or need a paycheck weekly or lack the desire to further educate yourself or the Drive to exceed , you probably need to stay where you are until you do......

    Not to say that you cannot have a little business on the side....while still working full time.........that works for many and can be a springboard eventually to Self Employment............

    Knowledge , creativity , problem solving & education in your field & Drive is what propels you beyond the competition and makes your phone ring while the competition sits Idle..........It's all about you & only you....and not your fancy Truck or shinny Equipment.........

    For all extensive purposes........People do business with people.......meaning if your not in-touch with your clientele or hearing what there saying or solving there problems.......your worth to them will drop like a bad habit! ...............It's a tough game , that requires the owner to be a leader & problem solver most of the time , a Missionary some times , compassionate other times , and a person that can interact with anyone in business as long as you can hold your own in your field of expertise......

    And the Rewards if successful can be many..........


    Been self employed most of my life , while also employed consulting w/ perks in a parallel field at the same time.....which I recently gave up the consulting portion after 32 years...people ask me when am I going to retire?.......and I always say I have been retired for decades , you just never noticed!


    Leave a comment:


  • Willvis
    replied
    Originally posted by FusionKing View Post

    Thanks.
    I felt I needed to say something to go along with all our warnings about the struggle.
    There's not much chance of me being able to stand a normal job. Not once you learn how to manage free will
    That's the biggest thing isn't it. I hope I never have to go back to working for someone else. Especially in industrial plants where you can't move a finger without breaking at least 10 "safety" rules

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by Ltbadd View Post

    What a great post, and back story. Thanks for that
    Thanks.
    I felt I needed to say something to go along with all our warnings about the struggle.
    There's not much chance of me being able to stand a normal job. Not once you learn how to manage free will

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Plus tig welding aluminum is more fun anyway. Especially when you can do it as good as you can, makes it that much more enjoyable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ltbadd
    replied
    Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
    I've seen great welders who were poor business men. They stayed poor
    I've seen pitiful welders who were great business men. They do ok sometimes. Until they get in over their heads.
    There are too many segments/niches in the welding world to give universal advice.
    I do strictly marine aluminum.
    But starting out I welded on tractors, bulldozers, chairs, a helicopter, race cars, new construction, handrails etc.
    Steel, aluminum, cast iron and stainless.
    I was a machinist in the Army and had two automotive machine shops, a muffler shop and an auto parts store. Some at one time and others at the same time.
    But NOTHING had the profit margins that the tig aluminum welding had. It took me to heights that quite frankly I never expected. I leave in a seasonal area. I have learned to create a backlog of work and keep people wanting and waiting. At times we are over 6 months behind. Yet we know how to line up work according to what the traffic will bear. If a guy brings in a broken chair he can wait a few days for it. If a guy brings a boat across 2 states and it's 6 weeks worth of work, he understands he will have to wait a good while. We have to do many more hours of wrenching, riveting, hauling etc. than welding. But it's all about the welding/fabricating.
    Finding your specialty/niche is the main key to success if you can manage your money at the same time.
    What a great post, and back story. Thanks for that

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    I've seen great welders who were poor business men. They stayed poor
    I've seen pitiful welders who were great business men. They do ok sometimes. Until they get in over their heads.
    There are too many segments/niches in the welding world to give universal advice.
    I do strictly marine aluminum.
    But starting out I welded on tractors, bulldozers, chairs, a helicopter, race cars, new construction, handrails etc.
    Steel, aluminum, cast iron and stainless.
    I was a machinist in the Army and had two automotive machine shops, a muffler shop and an auto parts store. Some at one time and others at the same time.
    But NOTHING had the profit margins that the tig aluminum welding had. It took me to heights that quite frankly I never expected. I leave in a seasonal area. I have learned to create a backlog of work and keep people wanting and waiting. At times we are over 6 months behind. Yet we know how to line up work according to what the traffic will bear. If a guy brings in a broken chair he can wait a few days for it. If a guy brings a boat across 2 states and it's 6 weeks worth of work, he understands he will have to wait a good while. We have to do many more hours of wrenching, riveting, hauling etc. than welding. But it's all about the welding/fabricating.
    Finding your specialty/niche is the main key to success if you can manage your money at the same time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Franz©
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    I hope he takes it as constructive advice on the pitfalls to watch out for and not discouragement.
    The business world is ever changing and usually a cruel environment. Learning facts and having realistic expectations before you jump into the pool and find out you can't swim beats drowning 10/1 in my book.
    I've known and seen many very talented weldors jump in and drown because they had plenty of welding skill and no business knowledge.

    Financing is in and of itself a whole other nightmare. No shortage of bankers waiting to stick their hand in your pocket, and you'll find no warmth in any of their hearts. Bankers all have friends who will help you write a business plan, for a fee, and then you MIGHT be able to borrow money. If all else fails because the plan is pie in the sky, there is always SBA and other government help. Success ratio on those deals is about 5%.

    Then there is the reality of competition. Throat cutting is just part of doing business, and reality is less completion equals more profit for existing business. I've spent a bit of money sending men to schools and developing them into fine craftsmen, and a few thanked me by becoming my competitor. Fine, that's business. When they hit a wall I was there to push them into it harder, and when they went in the deep water I tossed them a manhole cover. That's also just business.

    There is also the reality of nonpaying customers. They range from a guy named Fred to General Motors and include all sizes between. Some send Bankruptcy notices, in 2019 most just move down the road and re-play in a new town. You still don't get your money due, and if you borrowed money to do the job you're really SCREWED, cause the banker will get his $$$ back, even if he kills your business and takes your parents paid off house to get it.

    Toss in you're a 1 man show. WHAT is the plan for the eventuality you get hurt or sick? Will you be able to come back and will your customers be waiting for you? Do you owe a banker?

    Nature and evolution will lead a man to be cautious. Look where your foot is going to land before you step off is natural. Want and desire are products of salesmanship. I've been around a while, met many salesmen, and have yet to meet one who had my best interest first in his daily plan.
    Al Newhart (the man who built USA Today) says failure is natural and to be expected in business. He failed miserably in his first effort. He also says if you must fail do it before you ate 40 so you have a chance to recover.

    The last business I built became an employee owned operation 4 days before my heart was carved on. It was a profitable business at the time, and because I survived I collected payments. Two years later the business was bought by some smart young men with bank financing with my blessing. They had a business plan, financing, dreams and over 18 months no more need for the people who built and operated the business. That is just how things run. A year later the bankers wanted to sell it back to the sellers for 5 cents on the Dollar borrowed.

    You alone will choose to read that as discouraging or instructional.
    Either way, it won't change my bottom line one cent.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I hope he takes it as constructive advice on the pitfalls to watch out for and not discouragement.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ltbadd
    replied
    Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
    I'm so thankful I didn't have this forum to talk me out of going into the welding business when I didn't know what I was getting into.
    I could weld good. I had people who wanted me to come to their place. Then I went from there
    It's really hard to discuss such things on a forum, there's so much missing from a "text only" communication

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    I'm so thankful I didn't have this forum to talk me out of going into the welding business when I didn't know what I was getting into.
    I could weld good. I had people who wanted me to come to their place. Then I went from there

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I have a little maxstar 150sth that I've used on many portable jobs, it's an excellent machine and probably my single best purchase yet for portable and onsite work. I've welded on everything from hanging upside down in a commercial dish washer at Outback Steakhouse tig welding a stainless bracket back on to welding in heavy flip-up hook things on the frame rails of some roll on rolloff dumpster trucks at waste management. Good little machine. Not cheap. Worth every penny.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X