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Pipe thawing with inverter?

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  • FusionKing
    replied
    Some newer machines have a stuck stick recognition I believe.
    Thinking it was my 280?

    Leave a comment:


  • Lewis Hein
    replied
    When you ground it out it might just decide the electrodes are shorted and turn off the output entirely

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  • Ltbadd
    replied
    Originally posted by MAC702 View Post
    My tranny machine switches back and forth. I'd tap that.
    You mean AC and DC?

    Leave a comment:


  • MAC702
    replied
    My tranny machine switches back and forth. I'd tap that.

    Leave a comment:


  • aametalmaster
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Can you call it a "tranny" machine? What if it's a gender non-binary machine? Or a sis-gender machine? That's so non-inclusive of you....
    My Thunderbolt is a tranny machine with balls. Great machine ...Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • aametalmaster
    replied
    I have seen pipe thawing with a welder since the early 60's when my dad had a prortable rig. Now something I just saw and still am scratching my head. We have a Russian electrician at work and a 50 hp motor wouldn't run because it was cold outside. He pulled our engine drive Miller around to it and hooked up the welder leads to the motor leads and fired it up. Said the motor needed to warm up a little. After some time the leads were all reconnected and the motor fired right up. My dad said when he worked in the steel mill they used to jump the diesel switcher with a welding rig. Never saw it done...Bob

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Well, when I see an injustice, I must intervene. It's my duty, you see, as a civil servant and all. Besides, I have absolutely zero input on the frozen water pipe thawing thing. The weatherman so much as suggests a freak happen chance of freezing water pipes and the whole area buries it's head in the sand and closes down for a day or three.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Can you call it a "tranny" machine? What if it's a gender non-binary machine? Or a sis-gender machine? That's so non-inclusive of you....
    Ryan, I'm so glad your here to keep us out of gender trouble!

    Leave a comment:


  • snoeproe
    replied
    The local city utility crew used an Ac engine drive welder for years thawing pipes and frozen water lines in town. They used it at my place one winter. Frost was real deep that year and we had minimal snow (insulation).
    Worked like a charm, very fast.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Can you call it a "tranny" machine? What if it's a gender non-binary machine? Or a sis-gender machine? That's so non-inclusive of you....

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    I agree there is some difference in a dead short, hence the super low duty cycle on the tranny machines. Its also for electric system safety, a number 6 ground wire wouldn't turn to red at that current range like it will at 200A or even more.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    There is a difference between running a rod and thawing pipe.
    Run a rod for a bit and then stick it. Listen to the difference in sound the welding machine makes.
    Not saying the machine cannot handle it.
    I'm just acknowledging the difference between carrying an arc and a dead short.
    I vote to continue the use of your engine drive if one can. They are built much more rugged..... esp. the older non-board types IMHO

    Leave a comment:


  • Noel
    replied
    Originally posted by Sberry View Post
    I didn't figure them to calculate the power needed but was curious about the sustained output, would it hurt anything within the duty cycle? I have a 150. Does it heat the unit anymore within this duty cycle on 120v vs 240? I wouldn't think so. That's all the circle around the 75 means on the buzzers, its 100% at 75A. The machine doesn't know if its thawing or welding.
    The other day I went for a test where they injected a radioactive tracer element to high light blockages in my cardiovascular system when subjected to gamma radiation imaging. I mention that for emphasis on a couple of key points. One is duty cycle as you mentioned. You can think duty cycle and electricity, or you can think duty cycle and electronics.
    The other is does it know if it's welding or thawing pipe? Take a transformer and listen to the sound welding, then sort out an electrode and noticed if it changes. If it does...I'd say it's talking to you and saying" we ain't welding were thawing this pipe".

    Now if we actually saw electrons flowing...did some thermal imaging, I think you'd soon discover the hot spots from continuous operations, even with in the welder duty cycle because it would possibly begin to exceed the limits of the electronics manufacturing duty cycle.

    For the record, I don't know enough to talk with any authority on such things...But I tell myself I know enough to tell a story to make it sound almost believable? Have I got you convinced?
    If not, it wasn't for a lack of trying on my part. That little AC/DC transformer. That's not R2D2 in a box. That's electricity come in, High volts low amps, induced into High amps, low volts, a switch and a dial or crank.

    I still think it'd have lots to say about it?

    In a different perspective...sitting simmering at 75amps...that's like the energy to power 139, 60 watt light bulbs.

    "In the United States, most household appliances work at 110 Volts. So the calculation is divide the Wattage by 110. For example: A
    40
    Watts bulb draws
    0.36 Amps
    to operate. A
    60
    Watts bulb draws
    0.54 Amps
    to operate."

    That job could take a while? Hummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.

    "Does it heat the unit anymore within this duty cycle on 120v vs 240?"

    I'm going "guess", less heat on 240?
    I'm thinking, if my belly's full I'm not moving very fast so how hot will I get?
    If I'm wrong and you've read this far, correct me please.

    Always best to take a guess rather then leave things blank when faced with a test question.
    I'm not saying it's a correct answer, or a test question... just I don't leave a blank when doing a test.

    139 light bulbs...kind of explains the power bill doesn't it?

    Leave a comment:


  • Willvis
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    I'll bet nobody around here has even heard of such things.
    Im from Canada and been welding for 15 years and Ive never heard of this lol

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    I didn't figure them to calculate the power needed but was curious about the sustained output, would it hurt anything within the duty cycle? I have a 150. Does it heat the unit anymore within this duty cycle on 120v vs 240? I wouldn't think so. That's all the circle around the 75 means on the buzzers, its 100% at 75A. The machine doesn't know if its thawing or welding.

    Leave a comment:

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