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Pipe thawing with inverter?

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  • MAC702
    replied
    Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
    I was always told that the arrow mark at 75 amps on a Tombstone was the setting for pipe thawing....
    I'll be ****ed. I just looked at mine, an AC/DC model. The 75 mark is circled.

    But.... what's this pipe thawing thing?

    Leave a comment:


  • Noel
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Man, you guys in the frozen tundra and your tribulations. I just got back from a 5 day backpacking trip. It got down to 34 one night and my backpacking buddy thought we were going to freeze to death. Those of us on the gulf coast just don't worry much about using our welders to zap frozen water pipes. I'll bet nobody around here has even heard of such things.
    Lol! Not freezing to death we learn early in life. Right before don't lick the pole. Followed by do you want to look good or stay warm?
    34 degrees, tee shirt weather. Buddy needs a better sleeping bag.

    This pipe thawing, I only did it once, an underground electrical conduit had filled with water, froze and the electricians couldn't pull wire out of it. I'm not saying it doesn't happen, but up here we insulate everything because we expect it. It's parts of the country that don't expect it that pay full price when it gets this cold. I'm sure there is going to be a mess of troubles judging by what I've seen on the news.

    https://www.weather.gc.ca/city/pages..._metric_e.html

    Today wasn't so bad, tomorrow however it starts going down hill again. Any luck at all, another couple of months and things should turn around?

    Sberry, I could be off the mark on this, but your assuming a lot from the boys who design such things? They have no idea the size of pipe, length of run, the material, the degree of cold. They design welding machines. Strike an arc, lay a bead.

    They might say, you bought a welder not a frozen pipe thawing machine? Or they might come back with, well if you did short out R2D2 at this many amps in attempts to thaw pipe in the range of duty cycle, we did some product design tests accounting for such things, give it a go... would you feel better about taking that chance?

    I'm sure it can with in limits, sustain a shorted condition, but as most seemingly agree, it wouldn't be the best option forward for the risk of damage and the cost to repair or replace toasted parts to find out for how long it lasts doing so.







    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    The whole point was to ask before trying it. I was curious what the guys that designed them thought?

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Man, you guys in the frozen tundra and your tribulations. I just got back from a 5 day backpacking trip. It got down to 34 one night and my backpacking buddy thought we were going to freeze to death. Those of us on the gulf coast just don't worry much about using our welders to zap frozen water pipes. I'll bet nobody around here has even heard of such things.

    Leave a comment:


  • Noel
    replied
    Before I go out and move some melting snow, I thought I'd comment again in light of the polar vortex and the suffering it's causing. Aeronca41 summed it up best. That's an expensive toy to treat like a toaster.
    So...I recently discovered a post where buddy took apart an electric blanket and used the heating coil as the basis for a rod oven. Getting past the cheapness, there is some creativity going on with that wouldn't you think?

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Originally posted by aametalmaster View Post
    Another seasoned veteran of this forum with over 4,000 posts and zero orange bars...Bob
    We will never understand......

    Leave a comment:


  • Burnt hands
    replied
    Used my LMSW-52 spot welder to help a neighbor with a frozen pipe several years ago.

    Used his dryer outlet to power the welder and used two 6 ft pieces of 1/0 cable to connect to the pipe.

    Worked from an open faucet toward the frozen section. Worked well with no issues.

    Leave a comment:


  • aametalmaster
    replied
    Another seasoned veteran of this forum with over 4,000 posts and zero orange bars...Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    I have a small Maxstar. I have used buzzers, if they are outside will run above the 75A. I normally use engine drives.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    I was always told that the arrow mark at 75 amps on a Tombstone was the setting for pipe thawing.

    I would rather freeze and bust my pipes than screw up my inverter welder.

    That being said I don't recall the size being mentioned. If you have a 350 or 700 then no problem

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    I have other machines, I have thawed a lot. I was just curious how the inverter would work. Something that works great is amp probe. So nice to be able to see actual current.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    just sounds scary. Not something I'd try with my inverter machine. You could buy a couple of AC Lincolns on CL for what a repair would cost and just use them for thawing.

    Leave a comment:


  • aametalmaster
    replied
    Use AC, ground on one end and electrode holder on the other, crank it up and let it go. Did it almost everyday to our barn 30 years ago. But it was a transformer machine...Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • Noel
    replied
    While I'm curious to know how long it lasts in the attempt to do so, I'm going to say not a great idea to try and find out.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    started a topic Pipe thawing with inverter?

    Pipe thawing with inverter?

    Can a guy thaw pipe with a Maxstar? As long as it was below the duty cycle?
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