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Welding smaller pipe.

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  • Willvis
    replied
    Takes a very steady hand for clean cuts I find. Patience helps aswell and a clean tip. But just like anything the more you do it the better you get at it. Ive done so little torch cutting in the last 10 years. I could weld those fittings togethor, full pen, pass xray everytime in my sleep. But I could not cut that flange out nearly as clean as you did. I embarrassed myself cutting a circle out of some plate the other day. I thought I should slap myself for the dog chewed mess I made haha.

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  • sledsports
    replied
    Originally posted by FusionKing View Post

    One of the best posts I've seen for quite awhile
    I have to agree King

    Leave a comment:


  • sledsports
    replied
    Originally posted by Noel View Post

    I was lucky to have had a mentor who knew a little bit about the secrets to do it well. I like to think I hold my own with the process? I'm surprised however that most don't place more value to the skills behind quality hand torch cutting, but like welding, it's as deep or shallow as one choose to see it.

    I got a few jobs not for my welding abilities but the need for solid torch skills, that's in short supply it seems?
    Good looking work Noel. We are a dying bread for sure with these plasma tables and water jet machines becoming more and more popular and affordable .

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by Noel View Post

    I was lucky to have had a mentor who knew a little bit about the secrets to do it well. I like to think I hold my own with the process? I'm surprised however that most don't place more value to the skills behind quality hand torch cutting, but like welding, it's as deep or shallow as one choose to see it.

    I got a few jobs not for my welding abilities but the need for solid torch skills, that's in short supply it seems?
    One of the best posts I've seen for quite awhile

    Leave a comment:


  • Noel
    replied
    Originally posted by sledsports View Post

    Hand torch work is a getting to be a lost art form. Thank you for the kind words guys. I get into several hand cutting projects. I will post more of them instead of my ugly welding lol
    I was lucky to have had a mentor who knew a little bit about the secrets to do it well. I like to think I hold my own with the process? I'm surprised however that most don't place more value to the skills behind quality hand torch cutting, but like welding, it's as deep or shallow as one choose to see it.

    I got a few jobs not for my welding abilities but the need for solid torch skills, that's in short supply it seems?

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I run into welding smaller tubes to larger tubes with the race car junk I weld on fairly regularly. What's generally more trouble is the positioning you find yourself in to get these things welded up. Looks like the doohickey you have there is easily moved around, so that part is handled. But what I do, what helps me when I get these sorts of joints done nicely is this:

    I take my time. Make shorter welds if I need to.

    I jump around making similar welds, such as the outsides, tops or bottoms, before I have to adjust my tungsten to get into a tighter spot.

    I use the biggest gas lense I can get away with because it'll help shield your not-so-perfect torch angles.

    Because I'm moving slower, when the joint gets too hot, I stop and let it cool. Sometimes that means I might only get one dab in there at a time.

    I also brush the joint up good before I light back up. Any oxidation you got on there from the last arc you carried will just make things exponentially worse when you light back off.

    Sometimes a stick of 309 filler will help you get through a tough spot. That 309 will smooth out any porosity or bubbling of the weld puddle.

    Every now and then I'll pulse with the foot pedal, and even less frequently I'll set up the high speed pulse. The HSP actually does help, it's just not something I've come accustomed to.

    And finally, the most obvious, I focus most of the arc on the heavier pipe and walk it over to the smaller one. Keeping that torch pointed toward the heavier chunk of metal seems to help a little. It's not magic, but it helps some.

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  • sledsports
    replied
    Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post
    I just saw the last picture--have to second Noel's comment--Nice torch work! That is a beautiful thing.
    Hand torch work is a getting to be a lost art form. Thank you for the kind words guys. I get into several hand cutting projects. I will post more of them instead of my ugly welding lol

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    I just saw the last picture--have to second Noel's comment--Nice torch work! That is a beautiful thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • sledsports
    replied
    Thank you. I am starting to get back into the swing of things. I purchased this Dynasty 400 new last winter replacing my syncrowave 350 Lx and my health took a turn for the worse. I haven't had this machine setup too awfully long. Had some programming issues at first . It's like learning all over again.
    Last edited by sledsports; 01-31-2019, 05:35 PM. Reason: Because im almost illiterate

    Leave a comment:


  • Noel
    replied
    Experience they say is a wonderful teacher... so is time. Functional works.
    Once a guy gets past perfection as the end goal, with failure if it isn't reached as what's left, it gets easier. The next one is always better.

    10 points for weld appearance. Size, shape, uniformity. None of those three do anything for functionality, but they do suggest ability to control something?

    I was told the hard part of welding was stopping? The moments response of ego over common sense. I can do this? That little bit of practice, even going in hot, if you learn when to stop, let things cool, you stay in control.

    Admittedly, when you see a weld that scores 9-10 on appearance the guy who's done it has things dialed in, is robot consistent and has the eye hand coordination of a Singer sewing machine. I'm not him either. But I have learned that stopping, repositioning, regaining control sooner yields better results.

    I thought it was great you posted it, and the effort you went through, commendable. Not enough to push me off the couch to visit the shop but it has me thinking I should get after a few projects left undone? Keep a strain on.



    Leave a comment:


  • sledsports
    replied
    Originally posted by Noel View Post
    Sledsports, I'm going to comment again after looking over your pictures.
    I like it.

    If I might, I'd like to ask a few questions and offer some further advice. Why didn't you use GMAW? Why did you Choose GTAW? And if you had to choose a second time, would you still uses GTAW?

    Now some advice. Watch the current and arc length. When it comes to GTAW, welding hot because it's quick hurts more then it helps. I noticed a few spots that appeared "Hot". Washed out. Puddle fluidity and issues with filling. Width as well has changed. That says lost control? It happens.

    I toured the Kennedy Space Center and looked at the welds on every rocket engine and structure I could find. The thoughts as I looked them over were not that they looked cold, but that they looked controllable.

    Nice job cutting the header flange. Now think of that GTAW weld like that cut. Just enough heat to sustain it and travel smoothly. Dip, dip, dip...1/16", Dip...dip...dip...3/32". Then again, some just watch it dribble and stream?

    Unsolicited as It is, my next piece of advice might raise eyebrows... take it with a grain of salt.

    I think you would have achieved the same results but better with GMAW. The better would have been that if you were charging for the service, following the do no harm approach, you'd have saved labour, consumable costs and process cost arc on time. Nothing wrong doing GTAW , but it shouldn't always be the first choice just because it's cool.

    I'd have suggest, do you think GMAW is a viable option? Call it stacking dime hot GMAW, spot, spot, spot, spot... does it get easier?
    Truth be told you could have used SMAW with a AC transformer and E6011. It is what it is right? Stick them together, seal it up, voila, a manifold?

    A while back I had a similar project come my way. Turbo charger installation and home made manifolds. Anyhow, I know the work, you got it done, and I'm sure if another is in the cards or comes your way, it'll get easier. Usually better.

    Like a gas station that fills tire with a hand pump over a compressor, cause it gives it a personal touch? Lol? That just came to me?
    You've been doing lots, posting plenty (I like pictures) and you got the coolest pet. And I hope you think about what I mentioned with a open and broadening mind.

    While I can attest to having a guess on what you had hoped to accomplish, a nicely wrapped band of consistent ripples, it's about controlling the variables that make it happen.

    My last advice, grab a pipe and start reducing the current. Slow the process down a notch, and practice rolling the wrist. 1/4 at a time. 3 to 12. Start at the far end, work towards your self. Every inch closer do another. Don't let the pipe get to hot.
    Call it dialing in or what ever you want but really what's happening is your discovering the relationship between what you melt and how quickly you react while keep working variables consistent.
    Pay attention to the current and arc length. See what a lower current does with a short or lengthened arc length? For giggles, see what happens when you adjust arc control?

    Food for thought?


    You nailed it brother. You nailed it to the tee!. You can bet the next time I do one of these buggers its gonna be done a little differently. I choose the wrong process for the experience I have with the material. The 2 didnt go together because of the guy behind the hood for sure on this. Yes It was a freebie for a relative's little OG Crawler he is tinkering with. It turned out functional. Thank you for the kind words on the hand burning. I've got a lot of hours in a structural shop with the exact Harris that cut that behind a #5 face shield. My first reasoning for choosing the process was "itll be a good learning experience". Yea I learned I should of got me a whole bunch of scraps and dialed myself and the machine in. By the time I got it finished I was ready to pull my hair out. I was never so ready to put the thing on the mill and face it off flat in all my life. I was a total lose of control continuously. I have did some headers and intake manolds before but this thing gave me the heebie geebies.

    Leave a comment:


  • Noel
    replied
    Sledsports, I'm going to comment again after looking over your pictures.
    I like it.

    If I might, I'd like to ask a few questions and offer some further advice. Why didn't you use GMAW? Why did you Choose GTAW? And if you had to choose a second time, would you still uses GTAW?

    Now some advice. Watch the current and arc length. When it comes to GTAW, welding hot because it's quick hurts more then it helps. I noticed a few spots that appeared "Hot". Washed out. Puddle fluidity and issues with filling. Width as well has changed. That says lost control? It happens.

    I toured the Kennedy Space Center and looked at the welds on every rocket engine and structure I could find. The thoughts as I looked them over were not that they looked cold, but that they looked controllable.

    Nice job cutting the header flange. Now think of that GTAW weld like that cut. Just enough heat to sustain it and travel smoothly. Dip, dip, dip...1/16", Dip...dip...dip...3/32". Then again, some just watch it dribble and stream?

    Unsolicited as It is, my next piece of advice might raise eyebrows... take it with a grain of salt.

    I think you would have achieved the same results but better with GMAW. The better would have been that if you were charging for the service, following the do no harm approach, you'd have saved labour, consumable costs and process cost arc on time. Nothing wrong doing GTAW , but it shouldn't always be the first choice just because it's cool.

    I'd have suggest, do you think GMAW is a viable option? Call it stacking dime hot GMAW, spot, spot, spot, spot... does it get easier?
    Truth be told you could have used SMAW with a AC transformer and E6011. It is what it is right? Stick them together, seal it up, voila, a manifold?

    A while back I had a similar project come my way. Turbo charger installation and home made manifolds. Anyhow, I know the work, you got it done, and I'm sure if another is in the cards or comes your way, it'll get easier. Usually better.

    Like a gas station that fills tire with a hand pump over a compressor, cause it gives it a personal touch? Lol? That just came to me?
    You've been doing lots, posting plenty (I like pictures) and you got the coolest pet. And I hope you think about what I mentioned with a open and broadening mind.

    While I can attest to having a guess on what you had hoped to accomplish, a nicely wrapped band of consistent ripples, it's about controlling the variables that make it happen.

    My last advice, grab a pipe and start reducing the current. Slow the process down a notch, and practice rolling the wrist. 1/4 at a time. 3 to 12. Start at the far end, work towards your self. Every inch closer do another. Don't let the pipe get to hot.
    Call it dialing in or what ever you want but really what's happening is your discovering the relationship between what you melt and how quickly you react while keep working variables consistent.
    Pay attention to the current and arc length. See what a lower current does with a short or lengthened arc length? For giggles, see what happens when you adjust arc control?

    Food for thought?



    Leave a comment:


  • Willvis
    replied
    Originally posted by tarry99 View Post
    even though I seen you cleaned it.....black pipe is about the lowest grade of steel out there and very dirty.
    I disagree somewhat. Its just mild steel pipe. Ive welded hundreds (maybe thousands?) Of xray joints with it. If you clean all paint and crap off it will weld perfectly fine. I do agree that its gross to weld sometimes. But that cause of the oil and paint that burns off as your welding. And since most of the fittings are from china or another asian country who knows what theyre putting in that paint. Painting and oiling the fittings should be banned in my opinion. Who cares about a bit of surface rust. No one gives 2 $hits about the guy who has to weld it and breathe those fumes though

    Leave a comment:


  • MAC702
    replied
    Most of those joints can be put onto a rotating positioner.

    Leave a comment:


  • tarry99
    replied
    As others have stated it is all about the wrist.......or should I say it's the range of motion of the wrist.........going around a joint is easy as long as you can re-position the part several times that fits within your range of motion..........before striking an arc I run my range of motion first and if the part needs to be re-positioned or I need to move I do so. Sometimes it's also the view getting blocked off......I'm also not to crazy about Tig welding black pipe.........even though I seen you cleaned it.....black pipe is about the lowest grade of steel out there and very dirty.

    Leave a comment:

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