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  • Ltbadd
    replied
    Originally posted by tarry99 View Post

    You know that ability & art went away many years ago for most of us...........My dad showed me how to braze & weld with coat hangers and use the cutting torch properly when I was about 10........He was a Millwright / Mechanic in a Steel Mill......and learned early how to weld both with gas and Arc and use torches.......... just after WW 2 broke out before I came along he volunteered for the armed services through his job at the mill , but when a recruitment officer read he could weld.......they pulled him and sent him to a job in the ship yards for the next 4 years while never losing any seniority from his original job. Most of the time welding on Merchant ships in Richmond but also did a stint at Mare Island welding on Subs................

    As a kid under his watchful eye I was always brazing mini-bike or go-kart frames together from conduit or water pipe.......I was always amazed at how ambidextrous he was being able to switch hands mid weld any position or cut while never stopping or lifting the hood............an art I never mastered , I still have & use his torches and Regulators.
    Great story, thanks for posting

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  • tarry99
    replied
    Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
    I have always been a fan of acetylene. But it will never feel as good in my hand as one of my old Victors.
    You know that ability & art went away many years ago for most of us...........My dad showed me how to braze & weld with coat hangers and use the cutting torch properly when I was about 10........He was a Millwright / Mechanic in a Steel Mill......and learned early how to weld both with gas and Arc and use torches.......... just after WW 2 broke out before I came along he volunteered for the armed services through his job at the mill , but when a recruitment officer read he could weld.......they pulled him and sent him to a job in the ship yards for the next 4 years while never losing any seniority from his original job. Most of the time welding on Merchant ships in Richmond but also did a stint at Mare Island welding on Subs................

    As a kid under his watchful eye I was always brazing mini-bike or go-kart frames together from conduit or water pipe.......I was always amazed at how ambidextrous he was being able to switch hands mid weld any position or cut while never stopping or lifting the hood............an art I never mastered , I still have & use his torches and Regulators.

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  • FusionKing
    replied
    I have always been a fan of acetylene.
    I don't really care for how plasma cuts on aluminum. I really don't do much steel either. In fact when I do something out of steel it is for myself at least 90% of the time. Or it's for someone close like a friend or relative. Either way it's cheap or free.
    So we use the torch for heating and bending or pre and post heating and annealing aluminum.
    But in the olden days, I worked in a steel fabrication shop. I was the dude who had to stop my project and cut out your steel order. It made me a pretty good hand with a torch.
    That being said, Noel, I had an experience similar to yours with an old pipe guy about being a "free hand burner" he called it. It was a job I had taken after the steel shop at a bigger shop in the next town. He lectured me and another guy (my best friend at the time) about how difficult it was. He showed us how good he was and then handed me the torch. After that day He hated our guts. He never let up and finally fired us both on the same day.
    We hated on him for a few years after that. But since then I'm thankful. I would have gotten nowhere had I stayed there.
    I have a Powermax 30 and want a 45. But it will never feel as good in my hand as one of my old Victors.

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  • Aeronca41
    replied
    sledsports--check private messages.

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  • sledsports
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Good lord...if I tried something like that, it would look like a kindergartener has done it. I probably would've got so agitated half way through I'd just slice it in half and throw it in the scrap bin. Who needs a plasmacam with you guys around?
    Thank you Ryan Jones. It's all what and where we started brother. When I got laid off from Weilers Steel my boss told me to take my squares and fitters tools along with my torch. He knew the doors were closing for good as the Weilers were getting old and their children had no interest in the business. He said "i may need them down the road"The newer prefabricated buildings with the stamped out parts and flimsy beams were taking over. We wasnt big enough (18 hourly guys) and would of costed a fortune to bring us up to speed. I went to a little hole In the wall machine shop and learned to tig aluminum with a Miller econotig on some kinda flimsy aluminum thing they were mass producing. I didnt get Into tig until i purchased my first syncrowave 200... then i bought a syncrowave 350lx... my wants got the best of me. Now I have the dynasty 400. Thank you again Guys. To all that have gave me pointers and commented.

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  • sledsports
    replied
    Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post
    Noel, Sledsports, you guys are awesome! Haven't seen work like that in many years. Thank you both for the great stories and pics!
    Thank you for the kind words. I know I am only 42 years old but I am realizing that I'm getting old. I now have war stories that I use to listen too from the ol timers when I was a young punk. Ohhh dont get me started on Train wrecking... I am finding your screen name and profile picture interesting Aeronca41. I took some flying lessons in a piper warrior and cessna 172 when I was in high school. Something I wish I could of afforded when I graduated. I play with a couple of R/C planes every now and then. Nothing fancy. Both ARTF kits. Both high wing trainers. Its relaxing

    Leave a comment:


  • sledsports
    replied
    Originally posted by Noel View Post
    That just put a smile to my face! A big old grin ear to ear. Well done indeed!
    Theres 2 bad mistakes I wouldn't of normally made in that cut. One being in the lower tube and one in the oxidizer stream near the tip. You inspired me to get out in the shop to do that. Check you PMs Noel.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Good lord...if I tried something like that, it would look like a kindergartener has done it. I probably would've got so agitated half way through I'd just slice it in half and throw it in the scrap bin. Who needs a plasmacam with you guys around?

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Noel, Sledsports, you guys are awesome! Haven't seen work like that in many years. Thank you both for the great stories and pics!

    Leave a comment:


  • Noel
    replied
    That just put a smile to my face! A big old grin ear to ear. Well done indeed!

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  • sledsports
    replied
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ID:	594914 bout the best I got for you Noel. I'm a little rusty. I can only cut It as good as I could draw it. Yep that this same exact Harris my boss handed me 20 some years ago. That's what I burnt it out with. You are the master my friend . Thank you for the kind words Noel.
    Attached Files

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  • Noel
    replied
    Don't sell yourself my short friend, remember it was your skills that I noticed in the first place. All I did was add some fancy. But thank you. And remember, you can do fancy.

    I've attached a few more pictures in the interest of sharing and encouraging others. Everything from fire pits to book ends. Some see scrap, I see a blank canvas.
    I always thought I 'd be more crafty, but I'm not? I'm just good with a torch, and tracing really well.

    The Thug Life and music note was my son's attempt at fancy when I enrolled him in a evening class to get him started on what I figured was a easy and profitable path to follow? Seems I was wrong? But he's a good kid and chose a different path. By all accounts, a poorer path. Guess he's a horse? Lol.

    The peace sign was a gift from a student. Reminds me I might have done some good during that time? I don't remember his name, but I recall the student was struggling on a number of levels to complete the program. Sometimes just a little extra help goes a long way and in this case, it was appreciated. I kept it as a reminder not to get comfortable in my job and the expectations placed upon me in the role of instructor.

    I keep thinking I should do a you tube video on the cutting process. Not that it hasn't been done, just that it needs to be explained a little "better" then what I've seen produced?

    If your interested, let me know and I'll do what I do best these days, take pictures and type. Being that it's to cold for much else, I seemingly have some time to do so and I enjoy seeing the results of that kind of effort.

    Oh yea...and when it comes to moose's, mine has the biggest.

    Leave a comment:


  • sledsports
    replied
    Originally posted by Noel View Post
    Pete was the old guy of the shop. This picture taken circa 1977, reminds me I was 21 years old once upon a time?
    A truck and trailer shop, we installed gravel boxes, pup hitches and did rig ups for winch trucks. Everything was hand cut and edges ground. My introduction to Pete was him inquiring did I go to school to be a welder or a grinder?

    He'd say you need two cutting tips, both should be kept clean, and used wisely. I was in the lane next to his and as luck would have it, I was a willing learner to all the knowledge he was willing to share, which he did freely, with those willing to listen and learn.

    My torch skills became what they become due to his guidance and instruction. That the skillful operation of a cutting torch was just as important as laying a pretty bead, and that while anyone could cut a piece of steel off, the guy who knew how did it better.
    Pete used to call out, hey [email protected]&K stick, I'm going to do something you might want to learn about. He was right, and I did.

    He would say, you could be a welder or you could be a professional welder, what do you want to be? I learned there is a right and wrong way to use a broom, a clean space reflects an image of professionalism, and a good tradesman stays on top of the mess he creates.
    When it came to cutting, proper gas pressure settings and a clean tip is like a sharp knife.

    RIP Pete. Gone but not forgotten.

    Thank you for the kind words regarding the torch skills. Part of the reason I never had a need for plasma cutting? But I know it's not magic, I know it's a valuable skill, and in full agreement in it being a lost art, under taught skill to have, hold and apply. I'm more impressed with torch skills then welding so when I see something hand cut smooth clean and square, I'm impressed.

    Back in my days of instructing, I would cut trophies out for top marks, performance, special occasions, and practice. My signature piece was enlarging someone's signature and cutting it out as a going away gift.
    Had one gal in a class of 29 guys who stood out in the crowd. Smart, keen to learn, excellent hand skills and a personality that made her good with people.
    She asked if I could cut this image out for her and well...do a couple of these in a class and it isn't long before the kids start to show some game with the torches so I said sure.
    It was photo copied to paper, glued to a Manilla folder, cut with an exactor blade and traced in soap stone to a chunk of plate. I still have the pattern if anyone is interested?

    Anyways...I hope folks reading get inspired, learn more and get better with those torch skills. Seems we are in agreement to the value they hold at home and industry.
    Thanks again.






    Noel I pretty sure you are better than I am sir. Very sharp work my friend. Now I'm gonna have to go lite up on something to get honed it so I can post it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Noel
    replied
    Pete was the old guy of the shop. This picture taken circa 1977, reminds me I was 21 years old once upon a time?
    A truck and trailer shop, we installed gravel boxes, pup hitches and did rig ups for winch trucks. Everything was hand cut and edges ground. My introduction to Pete was him inquiring did I go to school to be a welder or a grinder?

    He'd say you need two cutting tips, both should be kept clean, and used wisely. I was in the lane next to his and as luck would have it, I was a willing learner to all the knowledge he was willing to share, which he did freely, with those willing to listen and learn.

    My torch skills became what they become due to his guidance and instruction. That the skillful operation of a cutting torch was just as important as laying a pretty bead, and that while anyone could cut a piece of steel off, the guy who knew how did it better.
    Pete used to call out, hey [email protected]&K stick, I'm going to do something you might want to learn about. He was right, and I did.

    He would say, you could be a welder or you could be a professional welder, what do you want to be? I learned there is a right and wrong way to use a broom, a clean space reflects an image of professionalism, and a good tradesman stays on top of the mess he creates.
    When it came to cutting, proper gas pressure settings and a clean tip is like a sharp knife.

    RIP Pete. Gone but not forgotten.

    Thank you for the kind words regarding the torch skills. Part of the reason I never had a need for plasma cutting? But I know it's not magic, I know it's a valuable skill, and in full agreement in it being a lost art, under taught skill to have, hold and apply. I'm more impressed with torch skills then welding so when I see something hand cut smooth clean and square, I'm impressed.

    Back in my days of instructing, I would cut trophies out for top marks, performance, special occasions, and practice. My signature piece was enlarging someone's signature and cutting it out as a going away gift.
    Had one gal in a class of 29 guys who stood out in the crowd. Smart, keen to learn, excellent hand skills and a personality that made her good with people.
    She asked if I could cut this image out for her and well...do a couple of these in a class and it isn't long before the kids start to show some game with the torches so I said sure.
    It was photo copied to paper, glued to a Manilla folder, cut with an exactor blade and traced in soap stone to a chunk of plate. I still have the pattern if anyone is interested?

    Anyways...I hope folks reading get inspired, learn more and get better with those torch skills. Seems we are in agreement to the value they hold at home and industry.
    Thanks again.







    Leave a comment:


  • sledsports
    replied
    Originally posted by Willvis View Post
    Takes a very steady hand for clean cuts I find. Patience helps aswell and a clean tip. But just like anything the more you do it the better you get at it. Ive done so little torch cutting in the last 10 years. I could weld those fittings togethor, full pen, pass xray everytime in my sleep. But I could not cut that flange out nearly as clean as you did. I embarrassed myself cutting a circle out of some plate the other day. I thought I should slap myself for the dog chewed mess I made haha.
    We all have our strengths and weaknesses Will. Just what we have more experience at. I spent 7 out 8 hours with the exact harris I use today in a structural steel shop coping beams, angles, all sorts of different things. I was a kid and my boss handed me a Harris book with the torch new in the box, hand full of different size tips, cleaners and a wire brush. He told me to study it and learn it. We used natural gas and propane at the plant so we had 2 piece tips. I worked with a 1st class fitter, I was 2nd class fitter. I helped lay out and did all of the burning and tacking. Bout 3 years into it I went to 1st class. We hired 3 Boilermakers. 2 went into the weld department running LN9 feeders with 1/16 dual shield. The other I got as a helper. He was in his mid 30s... still just young enough to think he knew everything. He had that "I'm a boilermaker and your a dumba$$ kid" attitude as I was only 21 maybe 22 at the time. Well he helped me layout but I did the burning. About 4 days into it he asked why wouldn't I let him burn? My exact words were "burn this side of the line" and handed him the torch. He couldn't light it. He called it junk and cursed a few mins. My back turned to the blueprints... turned around and lit it and handed it back. He couldn't do it. He cursed and spit. I said here I will do it. I offered to teach but his reply was "I dont need no snooty a$$ kid to tell me how to do anything related to steel". 10 mins later I was short a helper and weiler steel was short a boilermaker. Theres no doubt that guy could do what he did in the Boilermakers but his attitude made him miserable a opportunity to learn something. I would love to teach hand oxy/fuel cutting and welding to someone if they could teach me tig.

    Leave a comment:

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