Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Welding smaller pipe.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Noel
    replied
    Oscar Jr's headers...Those bring back a few memories. Judging by my experiences, effort and rewards, the effort shows, and yes, they came out very nice indeed.

    Not to lose track of welding small diameter tubing, my aviation interest was in gas welding a fuselage for a home built. Got as far as a set of plans. 3/4 scale SE5 Bi Plane.
    I heard a while back some guy stole a plane. I'm thinking...the flying part probably isn't that hard, just all the other stuff they make you learn? Kind of like scuba diving and welding?

    https://www.itabc.ca/sites/default/files/welder-outline-july-2013.pdf
    https://tradesecrets.alberta.ca/SOURCES/PDFS/course_outlines/012_outline.pdf

    There was a time when I didn't think much about education. Or politics, the economy, global anything if it wasn't on the news. But I'm including links to the two provincial training programs. The need for a knowledgeable, skilled, transferable work force is seeming the direction of push in Alberta. I like that BC has left it, oxy-fuel, in.

    My 1st year training was 4 weeks oxy fuel and 4 weeks SMAW. A lot of Natural Gas Piping was done still in the 70's up to 6".
    I have a gas line that runs to my garage that I gas welded together with a home owners permit. That yellow jacket bad boy has been buried in the ground for a solid 30+ years. Lol...They treated welder's only slightly better back then let me tell you.

    - 27 Celsius. In case you didn't know what it looked like. Does it give you a chill? Cause it did me taking the pictures.

    Leave a comment:


  • Willvis
    replied
    Originally posted by Noel View Post

    What's missed, is when a person has used oxygen and acetylene gas learning to weld, braze, he walks away knowing heat and temperature, solid too liquid and the principles of so much more that make everything else, easier to understand and grasp, IMO, because it's easy to see happen.
    Perhaps thats why they still teach it in BC. Its the first thing you do, 2 weeks of oxy acetylene welding / brazing and soldering. That was 15 years ago for me and I have never welded with it since. I think I may have brazed once or twice for a job, or maybe it was my own project I can't remember haha. I think welding USED to be a good trade, I don't know if Id recommend it to anyone anymore. Back in the day when SMAW and oxy acetylene was all there was a guy got to lift his head from time to time, have a few minutes to look around while switching out rods. These days with GMAW/FCAW a guy doesn't get a break. Probably why Ive never been much of a shop guy. Safety and QC Nazi's that haven't got a clue have ruined field work aswell. Whenever I look around in the old plants and see of the old welds I think "man those guys had it made." Vissible perosity, undercut, lncomplete penetration, big ol 6010 texas weaves, you name it its there lol. And they were probably making a killing for the time and were well respected.

    Leave a comment:


  • MAC702
    replied
    C'mon. EVERYBODY comes to Las Vegas.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I'll buy the first round of anything except wine.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Oscar, nice job on those headers!

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    I just might get down sledsports' way this spring. Hope so.

    Leave a comment:


  • OscarJr
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Well, if any of you jokers come to southeast Texas, or even the Houston area...I'll buy the first round.

    I'm in Houston a few times a year, but unfortunately it's always for work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ltbadd
    replied
    Hope it's good coffee

    Click image for larger version

Name:	kramer coffee.gif
Views:	138
Size:	1.24 MB
ID:	594953

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Well, if any of you jokers come to southeast Texas, or even the Houston area...I'll buy the first round.
    ok
    as long as it's still coffee

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Well, if any of you jokers come to southeast Texas, or even the Houston area...I'll buy the first round.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by sledsports View Post
    This thread has been High jacked in the most pleasant way. Thank you all fellas!!! I have enjoyed these amazing stories. So much experience here for sure. You guys are all top notch in my book. Would love to sit down and have a cup of coffee with all of you!
    We could if people would only let out there location.
    Some of us travel more than others.

    Leave a comment:


  • sledsports
    replied
    This thread has been High jacked in the most pleasant way. Thank you all fellas!!! I have enjoyed these amazing stories. So much experience here for sure. You guys are all top notch in my book. Would love to sit down and have a cup of coffee with all of you!

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Originally posted by Noel View Post
    Real life, real drama, and real people. I enjoy the history stories as well. Interesting are the paths. Such a wealth of knowledge.

    Thinking about it, we either learned from someone, or it was the schools of hard knocks and the streets. The latter two options didn't always bring the best results from what I recall, but they still taught a fella something.

    I understand the weak points made that joining materials or cutting them with Oxy-Fuel processes are from days of old. Relics of the past out of use and favor to more modern processes. I get it. GMAW/FCAW has made welding easier quicker and faster. And PAC, same for cutting and gouging, and with cutting, less HAZ material is effected.

    What's missed, is when a person has used oxygen and acetylene gas learning to weld, braze, he walks away knowing heat and temperature, solid too liquid and the principles of so much more that make everything else, easier to understand and grasp, IMO, because it's easy to see happen.

    How does the song go, you don't know what you got till it's gone? Well, this conversation has also been a reminder to remember. Good stuff.

    Well stated, Noel. My dad would never allow me to move to the next process (from soldering to brazing to gas welding to stick--that's all we had back then) until he was confident I could consistently turn out nice work. First I had to be able to heat up a big soldering copper and solder galvanized sheet metal shapes [sal ammoniac block,flux, and bar solder] , then on to brazing, etc. To this day, gas welding is still my favorite process. Love it on 4130 tubing. His words from 60+ years ago still ring--"watch that puddle"; "too much heat on the vertical member--watch your torch angle", "slow down--watch the toes".....and on and on. The principles are the key. I can still remember the day I brazed some adapters to an oil filter, left it to cool on the bench, and went in the house. He came in about a half hour later and said, "Did you braze those adapters on that filter out there today?" When I said yes (and kept my smart teenage mouth from saying something like, "well, who do you think did it, Mom?" He said, "That is perfect--no way to do that job better than you did it." That one comment just drove me to do it the best every time. Sadly, I find it easy to embarrass myself now with my old eyes and lack of practice over these many years. But there is just something magical about moving that puddle around with a gas flame. And you learn stuff doing it that you can apply to many things.

    Leave a comment:


  • OscarJr
    replied
    I haven't done much smaller than about 1.5" but I did custom build two sets of longtube headers back in the day.











    As was mentioned, proper wrist motion is critical, but one thing that wasn't emphasized was head and body motion. Depending on where and how the joint is oriented, it might necessitate body movement that is almost always stabilized by your core muscles. You can't always weld out the entire joint from one spot/position.

    Leave a comment:


  • Noel
    replied
    Real life, real drama, and real people. I enjoy the history stories as well. Interesting are the paths. Such a wealth of knowledge.

    Thinking about it, we either learned from someone, or it was the schools of hard knocks and the streets. The latter two options didn't always bring the best results from what I recall, but they still taught a fella something.

    I understand the weak points made that joining materials or cutting them with Oxy-Fuel processes are from days of old. Relics of the past out of use and favor to more modern processes. I get it. GMAW/FCAW has made welding easier quicker and faster. And PAC, same for cutting and gouging, and with cutting, less HAZ material is effected.

    What's missed, is when a person has used oxygen and acetylene gas learning to weld, braze, he walks away knowing heat and temperature, solid too liquid and the principles of so much more that make everything else, easier to understand and grasp, IMO, because it's easy to see happen.

    How does the song go, you don't know what you got till it's gone? Well, this conversation has also been a reminder to remember. Good stuff.






    Leave a comment:

Working...
X