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Best Transformer Tig Machines

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  • Burnt hands
    replied
    Ryan,

    Yes, I have Thumper and you have Helga.

    Good equipment that will last for years.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Good lookin machine there.

    Leave a comment:


  • Burnt hands
    replied
    dalmatiangirl61,

    I have an old AIrco Heliwelder I will give you if you want.
    It was the first welder I bought and it was used when I got it.
    Still works and has the old mechanical contactor which pulls in each time the foot pedal is pressed.
    I named her "Thumper". I feed her 240 VAC 60 Hz single phase.
    I understand, you are way out west and I am in PA near Philadelphia but the offer stands.


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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I have a 1974 330 ab/p branded as an airco 3a. She's a skookum beast. I have had to repair it, even though the parts are updated and required some modification to the machine, she's choochin along just fine. If you look for a machine like that, make sure you have a way to unload it once you get her home; she's a big girl...

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Just so you know.....all those square wave machines have boards. Some are now obsolete too. Getting a transformer machine that is old can actually cause a lot of grief in certain cases. If you can't try it, then don't buy it. I'm not saying that those machines are junk. Just pointing out the fact that electronics were used to achieve "square wave" and they fail just like any other board and are not cheap when they do.
    Because there are enough people with the frame of mind that older is better, that it can in certain areas, drive the cost higher.

    If you want a older robust tig machine, look for a Miller AB/P 300 or a Lincoln 300/300
    Those 2 machines are rock solid and simple, you can find them being used in factories to this day. They can be run on lower amp service if not used for high amps. Outdated ? Yes. Badass ? Certainly And they weld aluminum perfectly too
    Any more than that and you are getting picky or at least better(at tigging) if you can use the options on newer designs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Yep--no help from PA! There are lots of machines in TX. Good luck; hope you find a deal on exactly what you need. You can put it in the truck and take it home.

    Leave a comment:


  • dalmatiangirl61
    replied
    PA is way too far away, at the moment I am out west in the most remote community in lower 48 states, others claim that title, but they have not figured out where we are yet. Pick a direction, any direction, and its 250+ miles to a major city, and nothing but sage brush inbetween. I'll be back in Tx soon, lots of equip down there.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Don't know where you are geographically, but this is a nice looking Syncrowave in Scranton PA. Not familiar enough with pricing to know if its a deal or not. Unfortunately, I can't get the link to paste into this post. If interested, look at Scranton PA craigslist and search under tools for Syncrowave.

    Leave a comment:


  • dalmatiangirl61
    replied
    Did a little more looking last night and see that "square wave" applies to many different models. The 2 that caught my eye, but are way too far away to consider are the Lincoln 300 and Airco 300. I see Lincoln has a new square wave 200, and price is not bad, but it looks awful small and makes me think cracker box.
    Machine was tested. Regulator Foot pedal Ground. what you see is what you get. I have the manual. | eBay!

    Leave a comment:


  • Willvis
    replied
    Have a look at the thermal arc 186 ac/dc. Very capable tig machine similar to a dynasty. I think I paid 1800 cdn for mine new with a pedal, tig torch, regulator etc. Most annoying thing I find about it is the fan is really loud and runs all the time. Other then that I love the machine and you can't beat it for the price. There are some other companies making similar machines like Eastwood for example but I don't know how good they are. Atleast with thermal arc alot of repair shops deal with them. You'll also need / want a cooler if your going to be doing much aluminum at all.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I have many hours on a precision tig 225, it's a fine machine. Basic tig machine, not a lot of frills, but it'll get it done.

    Your budget will dictate what machine will fit into your plan.

    Leave a comment:


  • ShieldArc
    replied
    Put Lincoln Precision Tig 275 on your list.

    Leave a comment:


  • dalmatiangirl61
    replied
    Thanks guys! Think I'll pass on that Miller above and keep my eye out for something nicer. Looking at nationwide ads I see a few other decent looking square wave machines like an Airco and Lincoln, anyone have experience with those? All too far away to consider, but they are not demanding the price of the Miller machines. Heading back to the more industrialized world soon, I'll keep my eyes open.
    Last edited by dalmatiangirl61; 01-20-2019, 11:39 PM.

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  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Nicely summarized, Will!

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Any machine you get will have a "board" in it, transformer or inverter.

    Biggest question is...how much do you want to spend?

    I have an old transformer machine, a newer transformer machine and a couple of inverter machines. I like them all and they all have a place in my shop. tarry99 is absolutely right about the sine wave vs square wave. But unless you're doing fancy stuff, you can certainly get by on fab and repair work with one of those old machines as they were used to successfully weld aluminum for decades. Aluminum is still aluminum.

    Leave a comment:

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