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Voltage Drop with MVP Cord?

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  • Voltage Drop with MVP Cord?

    I have two Multimatic machines (215 and the new 220) that I noticed something odd after getting my garage shop upgraded to its own 60A sub-panel when I had a new 200A service and panel installed to the house.

    I have a 50A breaker feeding a 6-50 outlet connected right below the new sub-panel using #8 AWG for the two conductors and the ground. When I check the voltage at the main coming into the panel it’s 245V. When I check the voltage at the outlet it’s also 245V.

    When I plug either of the welders in, the startup screen reports 238V on both machines. I called Miller tech support and the tech suggested the voltage drop may be due to electronics running onboard consuming power just while sitting idle, and to check the voltage with the machines plugged in. I did that and I still get 245V.

    My suspicion is that the small conductors in the MVP connector may be causing the voltage drop by creating a restricted path for the power coming in.

    Does it seem odd to anyone else, and have you observed the same thing? I don’t think it’s any issue for performance of the machines, but I was a bit disappointed that after having spent a considerable amount of money upgrading all of my electrical systems that I’m not seeing all of that used by the machines.

  • #2
    It's been years since I worked for an electrician as a teenager. Don't let this small voltage variation bother you. Those voltages are approximate numbers and the Miller techies are correct. 110, 220, 240 volts are approximate numbers. Actual numbers may vary. There are many factors that have have an effect on this, resistance being one of the largest. As long as Miller says that you're good to go, You are!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Grizzly1944 View Post
      It's been years since I worked for an electrician as a teenager. Don't let this small voltage variation bother you. Those voltages are approximate numbers and the Miller techies are correct. 110, 220, 240 volts are approximate numbers. Actual numbers may vary. There are many factors that have have an effect on this, resistance being one of the largest. As long as Miller says that you're good to go, You are!
      Right on. I'll second that statement--Don't worry about it. All power input voltages are nominal. I suspect that if you measure the voltage at the plug at different times of the day, you will find different voltages. Not always, but not uncommon. Plug 'em in and weld away.

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      • #4
        You are dealing with 3 different voltage measuring devices your volt meter and the 2 welders. The difference may lie in the accuracy of one of the readouts..
        ---Meltedmetal
        Last edited by Meltedmetal; 01-07-2019, 05:45 AM.
        ---Meltedmetal

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Meltedmetal View Post
          You are dealing with 3 different voltage measuring devices ...
          Ding-Ding-Ding.

          We have a winner.

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