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AEAD 200LE weld quality issue

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  • AEAD 200LE weld quality issue

    I have an old 200LE serial JB520713 and though running fine and creating weld current - the quality of the welds is sub-poor. It almost seems like it's gouging and it splatters almost as badly as welding through zinc.

    The motor is the Onan CCKA. It runs about 3100 without load in the weld position. It burns oil and is well worn but the governor keeps it in range as well as my other machine (which welds fine) so I don't believe it's a speed issue. It had sat for many years and I recently rebuilt the carb - cleaned the gas tank out - cleaned and set the points gap - set the valve lash - changed the oil - visually checked the slip rings which were quite clean - generally blew her out and cleaned her up.

    I have tried A/C and +/- DC and they all run similarly bad. 1/8" and 1/4" mild steel with all paint ground off to a nice clean shine.

    When I try to strike an arc with 7018 it immediately burns back the electrode into the Flux and I have to knock the Flux back to try again. I havnt been able to get a 70 rod to run after several tries and different heats.

    I can run 6011 but it burns down deeply. The puddle seems 'fluffy' and never really forms a bead to speak of. To keep the arc going I have to really plunge the tip downward to keep the arc length short enough to not just die out.

    I'm looking for any kind of input - need to run a few quick welds on a trailer and am frustrated at these issues. My blue star 2E has also decided to go no-spark and being as ignition parts for Tecumseh motors are so available (lol) I am hoping this is the easier fix!

  • #2
    I would check each diode in the bridge. You might have an open diode. You will need to disconnect each pig tail to isolate them. If they are good it might be the stabilizer. of course it could be a short brush but I figured you have already checked them.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the speedy reply! I'm looking over the manual and hoping what I am thinking reinforces the diode idea. I dabble in electronics but am certainly no expert.

      So the bridge is also referred to as the exciter yes? I see the 3 diodes there and that there is a 115v recepticle pulling from the exciter as well - which appears to be the single that should offer power in the weld position.

      That recepticle on my unit doesn't produce voltage in weld or power positions! Hopefully that means one of those diodes is the culpret!

      Is the test as simple as verifying continuity?
      Last edited by WinterTurtle; 01-03-2019, 07:52 AM.

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      • #4
        https://www.fluke.com/en-us/learn/be...tal-multimeter
        ---Meltedmetal

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        • #5
          Originally posted by WinterTurtle View Post
          ...So the bridge is also referred to as the exciter yes? I see the 3 diodes there and that there is a 115v recepticle pulling from the exciter as well - which appears to be the single that should offer power in the weld position.

          That recepticle on my unit doesn't produce voltage in weld or power positions! Hopefully that means one of those diodes is the culpret!

          Is the test as simple as verifying continuity?
          Actually, the bridge is a part of the exciter circuit. The exciter includes the rotating field and exciter windings in the generator. The exciter provides the "source power" to make the magnetic field for the main welding generator; when you adjust the current control on the front panel, you are adjusting the amount of current the exciter sends to the main welding rotating field, thus controlling how much weld current is generated. It also provides the AC power for the utility outlets. There are 4, not 3, diodes in the bridge that you need to check. These are not the big welding diodes in the lower right side of the schematic diagram, but the small bridge at the upper left. But, you probably already know that.

          Not having any power at the AC outlets is consistent with an exciter problem.

          The link Meltedmetal provided is excellent for testing diodes. In case your multimeter doesn't have a diode test function, you can still test them just using the ohmmeter function. With the leads connected one way, you should read open (generally OL on a digital meter); reverse the leads and you should have a very low resistance, very near zero. As long as there is a large difference between the resistance when you swap the leads, the diode is probably good.

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          • #6
            So thanks so much for all the help gents -- I checked the little 4 blade bridge unit and each diode tests good on one direction only so looks like that unit is good (unfortunately.) I also removed the brush holder and made sure none of the brushes were shorted to the bracket.

            The stabilizer is the large transformer on top right? Is the idea there to remove the leads and make sure it's not open through the leads nor shorted to ground?

            I hate to be so helpless but anything else I can check into?

            I read a number of different short pages about individual components - and watched a good video of the functions of an automotive alternator which helped as well -- I wish there was an hour-long video about welding generator troubleshooting theory!

            I took some pictures because everyone loves pictures! The first 2 are of the Bluestar and the rest are the AEAD I'm currently fooling with. https://imgur.com/a/L0XflWs The unit's got a lot of corrosion and is still fairly dirty which could certainly be a factor.

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            • #7
              Also forgot to add -- the power mode duplex outlets work in power mode. They make steady 115v but the frequency does not register on my meter for some reason... The single plug I believe is meant to power a feeder during welding is the one that's dead.

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