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  • lgjhn
    replied
    You're right PaulyFab.....The bed and saw setup on the Harbour Freight model looks identical to the Jet....kinda makes you wonder about that stuff.
    I've cut some cold-rolled round stock, some angle iron and flat stock with it. It's a little slow on the real hard stuff but seems to cut pretty square and gets the job done. It's definitely not a production shop saw, but for occasional use, it is more than adequate. I'm going to cut some square tubing to fab up some sub-frame connectors for one of my old cars and it should work fine for that kind of stuff.
    I just got to come up with some better roll--around wheels on by home-made stand for it....just haven't had time yet.

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  • Paulyfab
    replied
    Originally posted by lgjhn
    As PaulyFab did, I use the Harbour freight band saw. And as he stated the belt guard isn't much and the legs are a wobbley el cheapo deluxe setup, but a few minutes with the saw, some iron, my MM210 and a little thought and that situation can be remedied including raising up the bed up a little higher for us "American" folk....
    Ya, know if you look at the castings of the Jet and the chepo import thay are exatly the same. A frend of mine did exatly what you did, made a custom stand that was much sturdyer, higher and had a catch tray for chips. I have been uneasy about purchacing things from harbor fraight, I have been dissapointed, but that saw for the money is a great product. If I had'nt used one myself I would be sceptical. Don't get me wrong I like my Jet, but if your on a tight budget and need a saw it's somthing to look at.

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  • lgjhn
    replied
    As PaulyFab did, I use the Harbour freight band saw. And as he stated the belt guard isn't much and the legs are a wobbley el cheapo deluxe setup, but a few minutes with the saw, some iron, my MM210 and a little thought and that situation can be remedied including raising up the bed up a little higher for us "American" folk....

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  • Paulyfab
    replied
    Thanks for all the input on cutting options. I ended up going with the JET HVBS-56M 5"x6" horizontal bandsaw.
    Nice choice, I have the same modle and it works very well. It's nice to start a cut and walk away. It's a reasonable price to pay for a saw that cuts very well.

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  • hankj
    replied
    2002,

    It'll cut anything within it's rating. I've cut 8" wide .250 flat bar by flipping it over once the bow bottoms out and lining it up with the blade and cutting through the last 2"! I think you'll be happy with waht it can do.

    Hank

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  • 2002MIG
    replied
    Went with a Jet

    Thanks for all the input on cutting options. I ended up going with the JET HVBS-56M 5"x6" horizontal bandsaw. I found it at a local dealer for $260, which was only $60 more than a Dewalt chopsaw at Lowes. Assembly was straightforward, although the handle I received was not wide enough for the holes in the base. Easily remedied with a cordless drill, but kind of silly (talk about not matching tolerances).

    The JET is actually a pretty nice machine, with the understanding that it doesn't have the speed or power to muscle through lots of thick stock. I love Bulldog's Turn-Pro, but can't justify a machine that nice for the limited use I'll dish out. However, for a home shop the JET looks like it will do the trick. I did some test cuts on 0.125 thick 1"x3" square tubing, and it made nice square cuts right after setup. And as Hankj mentioned, a trashcan under the saw catches all the filings, so cleanup is easy.

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  • Kelly Aitken
    replied
    I have a bandsaw, chopsaw and a porta-band, The band saw is yhe better way to go. The down side are they are slower and I always have to move it around to store or use it. The porta-band is my next choise. It is quick and easy but your arms can get tired if you have a lot of cuts and you have to pay attention to get a square cut. I bought my chop saw because I thought It would be fast. It is but it is also loud, messy and throws a ton of sparks. It also requires more deburr.

    Kelly

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  • Paul Seaman
    replied
    I was given a DeWalt chop saw for chrstmas, from a friend. I have the DW871 chop saw, very high marks for this model. I admit I would like a carbide tipped dry saw, but hey a $200 chop saw as a gift I like it very much. The thought that counts, and it cuts like a beast. Stay away from Harbor freight models they just wont last!

    Peace,

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  • Slag
    replied
    I have a portaband that I use all the time.
    You can get one for under 300, and it will last forever.
    If your careful you can make some very good square cuts.

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  • fun4now
    replied
    cheepo to get started

    i agree with all above the band saw is the way to go if you have the space and the $$$$ last year i got a chop saw for fathers day, it was intended to be a short term fix till i could get a better 1 or a dand saw. i got it at big lots for $49.00 so figured when it died i would upgrade well almost a year and manny manny cuts later it is still going strong. it is a 15Amp 3500 rpm just like the big name saws even came with a spare set uf brushes for the motor. its cuts are a lil off due to blade bending as stated ubove but can be cleaned up with a 4 1/2" grinder with a sanding flap disk. you might try it for now to see if it will work or use it till you get the big dog, you might find as i did it will do the job fine and as you get the hang of the clean up itis quick and simple. you might just decide to keep it as your only cutting option as i did. eather way at $49.00 it will make a great backup or quick cut option. it was $49.00 on sail for fathers day i think it runs $59.00 or $69.00 when off sail.
    it is a BENCH PRO modle# J1G-355C 120V 15Amps 3500 Rpm's

    normaly i would say buy the best saw you can aford but this 1 is defenetly the exception to the roule. and more than werth every pennie

    you can try it out next time you are down to help with the roof

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  • Bulldog
    replied
    2002Mig,
    Good question! I have a Ridge abrasive chop saw and as chop saws go it's not a bad one.I also have a Turn Pro 7"x12" Horizontal/Vertical bandsaw and I got to tell ya the band saw is BY FAR a better way to go. The fact that it's convertable to a Vertical saw alone is reason enough to recommend it over a chop saw. Now the fact that it cuts MUCH more accurately and if you get a saw that has a coolant system your blades will outlast an abrasive wheel 10 or 20 to 1, and when the cut is made the cut piece won't be hot. Also with a band saw once you start the cut you can walk away and do something else. The saw will shut itself down once the cut is made. There are a ton of reasons that a "good" bandsaw is much better then the "best" abrasive style chop saw.I haven't even touched on all the safety reasons why bandsaws are better then chop saws. The Turn Pro that I have is a DH137-3190 and it's offered under alot of different names. I bought mine from Enco for around $700.
    Now as far as the circular cold saws go I have one at a plant down in Kingston and it's awesome! It's an Enco model DH422-3687 and it cost about $3000. The cut is awesome but the cost is high. I would love to have one in my home shop but I can't justify spending another $3000 for a saw when I have the band saw.
    If I had to have one... It would be the bandsaw. I like the vert/horz option.
    Bulldog

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  • HAWK
    replied
    2002MIG

    If you have time to look around, search for a good used dry cutting mitering bandsaw so you can cut angles also. ELLIS is a great saw and a lot of the race teams use their model 1100 portable dry saw. They also use the ELLIS 1600 which is overkill for most fab work. Mine is an older model I bought used, but it cuts like a brand new unit and you cannot beat the accuracy. If you want to know more, then check out the ELLIS site.

    Band saws are slower and more accurate than chop saws. They are also much cleaner and quieter. The ELLIS portable saws easily convert to vertical cutting saws with a pull of a pin.

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  • GRINDER
    replied
    I have been using an abrasive chop saw for 20 years (Milwaukee). They are noisy, dusty, and when the abrasive disk exits out of the stock you are cutting the disk flexes and produces a slight bevel. A word of caution, if you choose this type of saw for inside shop use, where a dust mask every time you use it. So, unless you need maximum portability, or are OK with marginal accuracy, I wouldn't buy this type.

    I have not used a multi-cut saw, but the literature/video and recomendations by those who have are something to consider.

    My first choice would be a vertical band saw, I believe they are the most versatile. DAKE makes a very nice saw (but pricey). The space they occupy could be an issue in your shop.

    I have observed a cold saw in action, very - very nice. A friend just recently bought a Doringer (http://www.doringer.com/ made in southern CA), a mere $4200. This saw is amazing, the blade is lubricated from a wet sump. This saw cuts through material very fast, clean, quiet and accurate with a milled finish at the cut line. It is hard to beat that with any other method except with a vertical mill or lathe.

    Hope I helped.
    Miles-of-Smiles
    GRINDER

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  • arcflash
    replied
    I just picked up a Makita multi cut chop saw. fast clean cuts. if your doing fab with tubing its the way to go.

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  • burninbriar
    replied
    I have used both types of saws and if I want an acurate cut the band saw is the way to go. Chop saws are fast but cant give the precision of a band saw and band saws are not that slow to make a differance in my opinion. Given the choice of one I would definately go with a band saw.

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