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Miller Multimatic 215 Longer Cord

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  • BukitCase
    replied
    "I'm a new welder and lucky to have a 215" - I thought about recommending that too, but Mike's first sentence made me think his 215 might still be under warranty, and the way MY luck runs the welder would DIE right after I DID that... Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Miller
    replied
    Take the cord that MasterKwan suggested cut the female end off and wire direct to the welder.
    Then you never have to hunt for your extension.

    Good Luck,
    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • mbg56
    replied
    OK - I found an 8/3 40' welders extension cord for just over $40. Will mod this cable to my needs. Thanks for the suggestions.

    Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • MasterKwan
    replied
    Originally posted by FusionKing View Post

    But you would cut your expensive @$$ welder cord that IS a special cord??
    It's just a power cord. If it was me, since I already owned it, I'd have no issue cutting it and then adding two ends. Make it two cords, one 40 foot and the other 10 ft. It's cheaper than buying an additional cord and making another short one.

    Use both when you're far away and just the short one when you're close.

    https://www.weldingsuppliesfromioc.c...v-dwc83stblk50

    I'm assuming it's something like this.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by mbg56 View Post

    Thanks Steve, but, it would make me cry to cut into my new $120 cord.
    But you would cut your expensive @$$ welder cord that IS a special cord?? I have seen wire and the 2 ends cost more than a new cord. Plus the time and cost to go get all that and put it all together.
    Or you could simply wire your welder receptacle further away to justify the nice pretty long cord

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    A bit of an extreme example, but especially in the summer time, misuse of extension cords causes a whole bunch of house fires for us.

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  • Aeronca41
    replied
    I would just put the NEMA 6-50 plug adapter on the welder, and make up a cord with male and female 6-50 plugs as others have suggested. If you need to consult an electrician as to how do it, that would certainly be advisable. Where are you located? Maybe someone here could help you out.

    And BukitCase is right on--I would not run a welder with the power feed line coiled up. I cringe when I see people using long, tightly-coiled-on-a-spool, cords even for a circular saw, which has a high current draw on startup. NOT good for the equipment. Yes it will work, but not for nearly as long as it would if it wasn't being abused. You are starving it for power when you start, and producing a surge when you stop. Just spread the cable out.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I don't really know how those special cords spread the load, but you need to be smart about it. Case in point, my buddy got a brand new Hobart handler dual voltage machine. He didn't want to spend the money for a good extension cord to run 230v. So he used a regular old extension cord, wired it a 230 breaker, like he did for his rotary lift. Used the 115v cord on the Hobart handler to plug into his makeshift 230v extension cord. Flipped the switch, the machine turned right on, then about ten seconds later said "POP!!" and promptly let the smoke out. Hobart was gracious enough to accept it as a return, even though he most likely caused it. Something to think about.

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  • OscarJr
    replied
    Originally posted by mbg56 View Post
    The Miller has a special cord for multiple voltages so I can't just buy a longer cord and hard wire it into the welder.
    Sure you can! It's not the cord that is special, it's the machine. Dual voltage welders are [for the most part] still 3-wire machines (assuming they are not 3-Φ capable). One wire is ground, and the other two wires need to see either 120V or 240V of potential difference between them.

    If the 215 is anything like my 211, it's just 10/3 cord (either 120V or 240V between the Black/white, and green/yellow for ground). Do you see where it comes in on the right side? The ends are simply 1/4" insulated female spade connectors. You could even up the wire size and use 8/3 and just make it 20-25ft (or whatever you need) long right from the welder!




    Do I recommend you do it? Nope. I don't know how well you know how to do this stuff. But I would, even though I haven't. Reason is I have a 6-gauge/4-conductor 100-foot extension cord that I can use for pretty much anything.
    Last edited by OscarJr; 08-09-2018, 06:24 PM.

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  • BukitCase
    replied
    "just coil the big 50' one on the wall with a couple of hooks and uncoil what I need depending on where I'm welding"

    You do NOT, NOT wanna do that - AC wiring, when coiled up, becomes a CHOKE - IOW, it becomes the AC equivalent of a RESISTOR and can give you FITS trying to figure out why your new welder isn't acting right...

    Ryan and MasterKwan's suggestion would be your other "best" option, for that short a cable #10 3-wire SO cord would be all you need... Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • MasterKwan
    replied
    I'd just buy some raw cable, some ends and make a shorter extension cord for close in work.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    You can buy the multi conductor cord by the foot at your local hardware store. Buy what you need. Make it.

    Leave a comment:


  • mbg56
    replied
    Originally posted by BukitCase View Post
    If you're comfortable with adding a couple connectors, you could cut your 50' into 10' and 40', just need a male and female nema 6-50 pair - you can always plug BOTH back together when you need the full 50'... Steve
    Thanks Steve, but, it would make me cry to cut into my new $120 cord. I was on the same track as you thinking for convenience I may need to buy another shorter extension. Or just coil the big 50' one on the wall with a couple of hooks and uncoil what I need depending on where I'm welding. I called Miller and they do not make a longer cord for the welder itself. I knew this extension would be big but never thought it would look like my garden hose.

    Mike
    Last edited by mbg56; 08-09-2018, 01:08 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • BukitCase
    replied
    If you're comfortable with adding a couple connectors, you could cut your 50' into 10' and 40', just need a male and female nema 6-50 pair - you can always plug BOTH back together when you need the full 50'... Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • mbg56
    started a topic Miller Multimatic 215 Longer Cord

    Miller Multimatic 215 Longer Cord

    I'm a new welder and lucky to have a 215. I bought a 230V 50' extension cord for welding behind a fence on the side of the garage. I have found that for very small things I would like to just outside of my garage. I only need about a 5 foot longer cord to do this so it's a pain to take out my big extension. The Miller has a special cord for multiple voltages so I can't just buy a longer cord and hard wire it into the welder.

    Guess I could just use 120V but any other suggestions?


    Thanks,

    Mike
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