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Dynasty 200 - wedding .035" 4130 aircraft fuselage

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  • Dynasty 200 - wedding .035" 4130 aircraft fuselage

    Hi,

    I registered with the forum a while ago, but other projects have taken up my time (motorcycles in the main) and delayed my progressing with the now current aircraft fuselage re-build.

    I am seek advice on setting up my Dynasty 200 to weld 0.035" Wall 4130 steel tube - I'm seeking any and all advice, particularly settings on my Dynasty, and recommend tungsten & filler rod.

    Many thanks in advance for your help!!

    Flatline

    p.s. that should have been 'Welding' in the title - not 'Wedding'!!
    Last edited by flatline; 08-07-2018, 11:00 AM.
    Dynasty 200 DX...

  • #2
    I prefer ER80SD2 for chromoly and any tungsten other than pure (green band) should be fine. I prefer 2% lanthanated (blue band) or the E3...I think it's called that...(purple band). But my tungsten preference is based on AC performance, not applicable to your situation in this project.

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    • #3
      Some good info here:

      https://www.millerwelds.com/resource...e-applications

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
        I prefer ER80SD2 for chromoly and any tungsten other than pure (green band) should be fine. I prefer 2% lanthanated (blue band) or the E3...I think it's called that...(purple band). But my tungsten preference is based on AC performance, not applicable to your situation in this project.
        ↑ I agree with this ↑

        Not only that, with a 0.035" wall, you're going to have to hold a super-tight arc and you will need 0.030" or at worst 0.035" filler rod. Start looking around to find a good deal on a 10lbs box, because by the pound you're going to be paying a fortune. Also, don't practice on the final project. Do practice welds on the bench to verify you are obtaining the depth of fusion you are looking for.
        HTP Invertig221 D.V. Water-cooled
        Eastwood MIG175 w/spoolgun
        Eastwood Versacut40 Plasma cutter

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        • #5
          I've never worked with an airframe, but I've a good deal experience with chromoly in racing junk. Have you dealt much with chromoly? I am imagining the similarities strictly based on the metal used, there are certain things to keep in mind when using this material, so if you're unsure of those considerations please say so.

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          • #6
            Some more good links:
            http://eaaforums.org/archive/index.php/t-247.html
            http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/welding-4130.html

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            • #7
              Yup, pretty much sums it all up. I was fabbing up a set of wheelie bars for a dragster a few weeks before going down for my hernia surgery. Set it all up in the jig and just before I started welding I turned all the ventilation fans off. It was July. On the gulf coast of Texas. Only way to make it hotter in that shop was to take the roof off and let the sun move in on top of me. Son, it was miserable. But I was worried about the air moving across the small diameter pipe was going to cool it too quick. Bad news on a part you don't want to fail. Ever.

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              • #8
                Ryan you have my profound respect for being able to live in that heat-especially being a northern boy! I did a very short time in Houston in August many years ago and vowed I would never return! And haven't. But I guess it's great for welding 4130!

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                • #9
                  Houston is easy living compared to here. Sometimes I pray for 100°F days!!
                  HTP Invertig221 D.V. Water-cooled
                  Eastwood MIG175 w/spoolgun
                  Eastwood Versacut40 Plasma cutter

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    At some point, miserable is just that. Back in Wisconsin, when it warmed up to 0 from -35, it felt awesome. Here, when it cools down to 95 from 104, it's still miserable.

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