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Someone talk me into or out of this Dialarc 250!

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  • Someone talk me into or out of this Dialarc 250!

    So I've got a seller with a literally brand new Dialarc 250 (not the HF model unfortunately), but he's only asking $750 and might even take less.
    Now keep in mind I'm on a very tight budget and have been trying to get up the $$ for a nice TIG/Stick machine like a Syncrowave 250 or similar, because I want a good stick welder and a TIG setup as well.
    So along comes this cheap Dialarc 250, and its got me strongly considering just buying it right now. So my question is this: As far as the SMAW process goes, how does this Dialarc 250 compare to a Sync 250? Does either machine have more (or less) featuresas far as stick welding goes. If the Dialarc 250 is possibly any better for SMAW than the Sync 250, then I may just go ahead and buy the dang thing. However, if the Sync 250 is basically just as good PLUS the TIG capability, then I see no point in even buying the Dialarc 250 at this time.
    IDK, just seeing what you ghys think Obviously a new Dialarc 250 for $700ish is a win, but it seriously sets me back on my TIG/Stick Sync 250 budget ya know. Thanks guys.

  • #2
    If you’re looking for a tig machine, hold off and get a tig machine. $750 for a used dialarc is an OK deal. Not stellar, but OK, depending on where you’re at of course. I say be patient.

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    • #3
      I hear ya. Just an FYI its a brand new Dialarc. I think they hooked it up once and never even burnt a rod, but I get your point. Still wondering how these two compare with Stick welding tho.

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      • #4
        I think you’d be happy with either one as a stick welder.

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        • #5
          Before I dumped money on the Dial Arc or the Syncrowave I'd ask three questions.

          1) Do I have the electrical service to support the draw?
          2) Can I afford the efficiency of the machine for daily operations?
          3) Can I find the space to park it?

          If the end goal is GTAW Aluminum you can always find add-on's to allow for it and probably be money ahead over the asking price of the wave depending on the deal you wrangle? That old stuff is going pretty cheap so you might want to wait and shop around a bit more?

          While carbon and stainless GTAW won't be as much an issue depending on your experience, if you want the high frequency starts, pulse and flow options for the process of GTAW, aluminum or other wise at your finger tips, not to mention square wave technology or more depending on model and features, wait.

          Having welded plenty of Aluminum GTAW on transformer rectifier machines that didn't have wave form technology I'll say this, it's not that hard to do but you also will discover why technology has advanced as it has. If you buy the Dial arc and 5 years from now decide to sell, you won't lose much if the machine is as nice as it sounds, well kept equipment holds value and you won't be replacing circuit boards.

          So, if you are mostly welding SMAW, and the 3 questions were answered positively, especially if you have no machine now, I'd be on it. I might add, show up in person, roll off 5 Ben Franklin's and remember your doing him a favor. Worst he can do is say no and you can keep looking. Good luck.

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          • #6
            Noel,
            That is an excellent reply, and all I can say is thank you so much for taking the time to post

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