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  • Wire speed control problem

    I just recently purchased a used Millermatic 130
    and it seems to have a wire speed control problem. With the wire speed turn down to 0. It seems like the wire speed is starting at 20%. With the welder still set at zero. If you change the voltage 1 through 4 the wire speed increases. It gets faster. But you can still increase the wire speed from the knob. Any help would be appreciated thanks
    Last edited by Prolsc; 07-04-2018, 07:26 AM.

  • #2
    Yup they do that. Its starts slow then speeds up. I don't like it at all and have seen lots of them like that...Bob
    Bob Wright

    Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

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    • #3
      This doesn't start off slow then ramp up it seems like the wire speed is moving way too fast.
      ​when the machine is set at zero the wire speed seems like it's set at 20

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      • #4
        Is there anyone that can help me with this ?????

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        • #5
          It looks to be normal... Does it weld OK and you think it is not working correctly?

          It will have at least 14 volts on the motor with the switch in position 1 and the speed at minimum... The speed will increase as you go from 1 through 4 even if you do not adjust the speed pot.

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          • #6
            Hello Prolsc. I believe that model has what was called wire feed speed tracking. Meaning if you have it on tap 1 and your wire speed on say 30 and you move the voltage to tap 2 you will notice the wire speed increases and so on. The drive motor power is fed off the main transformer, so each tap changes the wire feed speed ranges. And if you have the wire speed at 0 on tap 1 it will still probably turn the drive motor. I used to have a millermatic challenger 172 that had the same feature.
            Millermatic 211i
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            • #7
              Originally posted by Prolsc View Post
              I just recently purchased a used Millermatic 130
              Originally posted by Prolsc View Post
              and it seems to have a wire speed control problem. With the wire speed turn down to 0. It seems like the wire speed is starting at 20%. With the welder still set at zero you change the voltage 1 through 4 and the wire speed increases. It gets faster. But you can still increase the wire speed from the knob. Any help would be appreciated thanks

              Something about being dangerous with a bit of knowledge...that's me.

              I'm going to state openly, I've never tired to see if mine does that?
              Then again, I'm all for trying stuff, and when I ceased typing to try it, and I tried it... mine did the same thing. But I know why. I just needed to be sure?
              All in the name of science right?

              I can see how if you're following a path of thinking zero is zero you might be of the impression you got a broken one, but you don't. The power source is constant voltage so the amperage is variable. The feeder is self regulating of amperage based on voltage output , where in the circuit it's tapped from for a signal and to the maximum of the out put of the power source, it's volt/amp curve, and slope settings. While it's easy to say the dial increasing or decreasing the speed the wire exits is controlling amperage, it's label is loosely attached to the function.

              Look at the bright side, on a paper thin piece of steel with a 1 on the voltage and zero on the dial for wire feed speed, a small diameter wire, if you maintain a constant stick out, you can still run a bead.

              Miller's book on GMAW explains this better then I can, but at the end of the day, it's normal as the other responses previously mentioned.

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              • #8
                Thanks for the replies
                The welder does not weld correctly. It acts like it has a pulse feature. You can see the wire bouncing off the puddle. I can turn the wire speed all the way down. And the wire speed is still way too fast. I know it's not supposed to come to a complete stop when set to 0 but it is moving way too fast when it's set there compared to my other welders. I called Miller's Tech line and explained it to them they think it has a dead spot in the rheostat
                Last edited by Prolsc; 07-08-2018, 10:57 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Prolsc View Post
                  Thanks for the replies
                  The welder does not weld correctly. It acts like it has a pulse feature. You can see the wire bouncing off the puddle. I can turn the wire speed all the way down. And the wire speed is still way too fast. I know it's not supposed to come to a complete stop when set to 0 but it is moving way too fast when it's set there compared to my other welders. I called Miller's Tech line and explained it to them they think it has a dead spot in the rheostat

                  Let me start by saying your welcome. Can't speak for anyone else, but I try to be helpful.

                  You say the welder doesn't weld correctly? You could be right? But I can spin you a number of stories that would describe a GMAW power source appearing to pulse.
                  Depending on the wire size, tension settings on the drive roll and spool? Kinks or obstructions to the guide tubes and liners, and lets not forget a worn contact tip.

                  But really...your the guy who brings to the table your experience, knowledge and understanding of how all these components work together to decide the toy is broken. I'm no expert and electronics is well above my pay grade but it sounds to me like you need to invest in a multi meter? Buy a digital one.

                  MIller suggests a possible rheostat issue. I have to say it's sounds plausible? I'm just thinking, turn the dial. Does it turn smoothly? Loosely? Turn evenly? That rheostat is an arm riding contact to a segmented ring. With out a meter to test it, understanding how it should feel when you turn the dial could help with that diagnosis? It should feel like a paddle lock, click,click, clack click click click. kind thing. You get a clack you got a problem.

                  You mention wire bouncing off the puddle? Is the wire still connected or is it spitting droplets as it's pulsing? I'm assuming a solid wire because you didn't say, but...even with a flux cored or self shielded, that description needs to be expanded on bud.

                  Just curious, what size of wire are you using? Can you post a picture of what you got, working with? If nothing else, lurkers like pictures. I do a lot of lurking and pictures help.

                  Now...going out on a limb here...Your using solid wire, small diameter, and experiencing drive roll slippage due to movement/deflection in the location where the drive motor's shaft passes through the casing to the drive roll assembly. I think your rheostat is fine.
                  But I could be wrong?
                  Lol...good luck with that.

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                  • #10
                    Sounds like bad motor drive transistors. They can short closed and give full chooch no matter the speed setting. I am very new at this but from what I have seen with dc motor drivers between rc cars and power tools and YouTube research that's where I would start

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