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preferred rod for welding through galvanized

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  • preferred rod for welding through galvanized

    Was building a mounting bracket for another old junky machine (an old bench top drill press) I got yesterday. What I had on my scrap trailer was an old chimney cap, a 2’ x 3’ sheet of 3/16” galvanized steel. So I drank a big glass of milk, dawned my respirator and set after cutting and welding. I WAS NOT going to grind all that junk off there, so here’s what I tried:

    Plasma cut all the pieces, then...

    3/32 7018–ran very sluggish but just barely OK.

    3/32 6010–horrible.

    1/8 6010–horribler.

    1/8 7014–holy smokes, ran smooth and beautiful, although a skosh slow. I knew I kept some of this stuff around for something....

    What do you guys prefer to use when you’re in the unfortunate position to have to weld on some nasty, zinc oxide encrusted steel?

  • #2
    Dang. I've never done an empirical test before. Always just grabbed whatever rod was closest. Hold my breath, and get 'er done.

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    • #3
      Same here, just happen to have those rods on the work bench, figured I’d see which one worked the best. May as well when all you’re doing is welding up some junk for yourself.

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      • #4
        Silicon bronze if the weldment doesn't need the strength of a typical weld
        Richard

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        • #5
          7014. I don't use 6010, 6011 or 6013 at all and 7018 and 7014 is what I was raised with...Bob
          Bob Wright

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          • #6
            7014 is what is used on galvanized when building joints on a bridge. You can even run it negative polarity for better results on thin material.

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            • #7
              I've removed lots of 7018 on galvi steel, thats all we were allowed to use. Just grind off the galvi that you can and weld away. The first pass will spit a little. 6010 will burn right through the galvi but removing the gavi that you can is always best prior to welding.
              Last edited by snoeproe; 07-01-2018, 08:33 AM.
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              • #8
                I didn’t know that about bridge work.

                On the silicon bronze, I didn’t know it came in a welding rod. If I had remembered, I would’ve tried the silicon bronze mig wire I have.

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                • #9
                  I have always used 6011 when welding any galvanized material years ago. It cut through the "crap" readily and got down to the base metal for a solid weld. Now, I am talking about galvanized beams and columns in the petro industry.
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                  • #10
                    I keep 6011 on hand, but didn’t get too crazy testing rods on this junk. For one thing, I didn’t have all day to screw around, so I just used what was currently laying out.

                    Back on the farm, we used 6011 for everything. Generally cuts through whatever is in its path.

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                    • #11
                      Most folks here know about all I weld anymore is aluminum. Back in the day I welded a lot of steel. We normally used 6011 for anything crappy.
                      Always DC reverse. I hated 6011. I loved 7018.
                      If I can, one of old my "tricks" is to at least get 1 bare metal edge to burn into and push away crud, whether it may be rust, paint or galvanize.
                      Back when I worked at Haul-Rite we used 7014. That was in the seventies. AC downhill (not galvanized)
                      When I was a kid (18) I worked as the road crew welder for Galva-Foam dock company. Any welded mods we did was 6011 DC reverse.
                      Now-a-days I would use better prep and run bare wire mig. If my customers won't pay for prep I have created plenty of competition for them to try.
                      Once I know how to make a crappy weld I seldom repeat the process. 2 in a row and normally the entire shop weighs in.
                      In my opinion pre-galvanized is finished and ready for assembly.
                      Years back, somebody who was on one of these welding forums, died blacksmithing with scrap galvanized steel.
                      Racking my brain trying to remember who.....

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                      • #12
                        Twice. I’ve been a sick as a bad dog twice from galvanized. The first time I was welding it, the second time I was cutting up a 1” galvanized steel frame for one of those portable offices used in the oil field. I almost went to the ER that night, but I called poison control instead. Metal fume fever they called it. No treatment other than fluids and rest. I learned my lesson the hard way. Now, plasma cutting, grinding, welding, whatever....lots of ventilation, under hood respirator and a tall glass of milk before I start.

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                        • #13
                          Yup, that's what they called it. Metal fume fever. Bad bad stuff

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                          Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
                          MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
                          Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
                          Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

                          Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
                          Miller 30-A Spoolgun
                          Miller WC-115-A
                          Miller Spectrum 300
                          Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
                          Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                            Twice. I’ve been a sick as a bad dog twice from galvanized. The first time I was welding it, the second time I was cutting up a 1” galvanized steel frame for one of those portable offices used in the oil field. I almost went to the ER that night, but I called poison control instead. Metal fume fever they called it. No treatment other than fluids and rest. I learned my lesson the hard way. Now, plasma cutting, grinding, welding, whatever....lots of ventilation, under hood respirator and a tall glass of milk before I start.

                            I remember it as wishing for death...I think it starts with a taste that you first notice on your tongue. A lingering pill chalky taste. Your trying not to breath, but you do and the taste lingers. You know what happening and you rationalize it by thinking, team player, I'm the get er done guy, maybe it's the I need to keep my job? But when the wave of nausea arrives later you know you messed up your body big time. And the nausea, that's the good part. Depending on ones appetite for destruction, dry heaves and unshakeable chills follow. And they are unshakeable. NO blankets no hot showers make it go away or help you feel better. Cramps, tremor shivers and the passage of time makes the even end.

                            I realize we are talking SMAW electrodes to galvanized materials.
                            What I know now and didn't know then was the role polarity and arc length increased or decreased the fume generation rates of the materials and what's on the surface of them. As well, how the electrodes coating type effected the resulting action as it occurred.

                            I guess at the end of the day, I'll use what's handy for a rod if I had to weld some galvanized but I try to avoid it as much as possible.
                            Really...in the big picture, it doesn't matter as much what rod you choose as how you choose to use the rod.

                            What your trying to do is limit vaporization. You won't eliminate it, but you can control it. With current, polarity and arc length. The coating of an electrode effects droplet formation as does current type, it's polarity's and arc voltages. The goal being limiting the disruption too the arc caused by excessive low melting elements disturbing the shielding gases being generated, the formation of molten droplets being formed, and their transfer across the arc.

                            Thinking out loud,
                            if you take the approach of cranking the heat and burning through it, well...doesn't matter what you choose in my books. However, if you think about coating type, droplet formation, arc length, and current limiting fume generation...you might get why you enjoyed that E7014 so much?

                            Large electrode crucible, lower arc forces, smaller more plentiful droplets and a dense slag to clean pushing those slower melting elements away rather then burning them up into vapor particles.
                            Something like that.

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                            • #15
                              Don’t forget joint aches, difficulty breathing deep and chest pain...I highly recommend welding galvanized steel to any self destructive human being.

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