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Need to get a TIG Welder - Which One?

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  • Need to get a TIG Welder - Which One?

    I have been welding with a MIG for a while & would like to get a TIG for stainless & aluminum. Started looking at a Diversion 180. then looked at the Dynasty 210. Seems like there is allot more control and flexibility with the Dynasty, but do I need it? Also looked at the Multimatic 215. I do not need a MIG, but the cost of a Multimatic is less than that of a Diversion and it can handle thicker materia.

    What am I missing here?

  • #2
    The Multimatic 215 is DC only. No AC so no aluminum except with Mig. There is also the Synchowave series. I would say it depends on where you plan to go in the future.
    ---Meltedmetal
    Last edited by Meltedmetal; 05-10-2018, 01:41 PM.

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    • #3
      The Diversion's are very limited in duty cycle and capabilities as you have seen, is this for hobby use or making money?
      Richard

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Meltedmetal View Post
        The Multimatic 215 is DC only. No AC so no aluminum except with Mig. There is also the Synchowave series. I would say it depends on where you plan to go in the future.
        ---Meltedmetal
        Purpose is SS & AL welding as well as learning how to TIG.

        I did not realize that the Multimatic was DC only. Looks like the Syncrowave may be a good compromise - more capable than a Diversion but not as expensive as a Dynasty. Only downsides that I see is that a Syncrowave is heavy, and, does not have the waveform conrol that a Dynasty does.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Ltbadd View Post
          The Diversion's are very limited in duty cycle and capabilities as you have seen, is this for hobby use or making money?
          Not so much for making money (not at least on a production basis, but will be used for prototyping/development). Was more concerned about the control over the TIG process. Would the Syncrowave 210 be a good compromise or should I cry once & get a Dynasty?

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          • #6
            If you have a lot of extra money by all means spend it. If you are just learning I would look for an older used syncro 180 or a Lincoln 175/185 square wave tig. These units are pretty bullet proof and can run on a 50 amp/230 breaker. They usually hold their value so if you decide to upgrade you get your money back. If you decide it's not for you then you can still get your money back and move on. I think it's better to learn without all the bells and whistles. Just my opinion.

            As far as weight goes, is it going to sit on a cart in your shop or do you expect to be taking it to different places. If it's in your shop then don't worry about the weight.
            Last edited by MMW; 05-10-2018, 07:24 PM.
            MM250
            Trailblazer 250g
            22a feeder
            Lincoln ac/dc 225
            Victor O/A
            MM200 black face
            Whitney 30 ton hydraulic punch
            Lown 1/8x 36" power roller
            Arco roto-phase model M
            Vectrax 7x12 band saw
            Miller spectrum 875
            30a spoolgun w/wc-24
            Syncrowave 250
            RCCS-14

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            • #7
              Don't rule out the used market. Most
              of my Arsenal has been previously thrashed.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MMW View Post
                If you have a lot of extra money by all means spend it. If you are just learning I would look for an older used syncro 180 or a Lincoln 175/185 square wave tig. These units are pretty bullet proof and can run on a 50 amp/230 breaker. They usually hold their value so if you decide to upgrade you get your money back. If you decide it's not for you then you can still get your money back and move on. I think it's better to learn without all the bells and whistles. Just my opinion.

                As far as weight goes, is it going to sit on a cart in your shop or do you expect to be taking it to different places. If it's in your shop then don't worry about the weight.
                The weight is a little bit of a concern because i work out of my pole barn which still has a gravel floor. Looking for a basic machine that I can learn on and will not quickly outgrow. Does the Syncrowave have too many "bells and whistles", or, conversely does the Diversion not have all the necessary ones?

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                • #9
                  The arc quality of the Dynasty is pretty much unparalleled. You could set it on the "pro" setting (default) and never set it again.
                  Then as you learn you will never out grow it.
                  It is light enough you can slide it under your bed at night and sleep easy. It is also upgradeable with the card slot.
                  Get a water cooler and you will be set for life, but if you change your mind, used Dynasties go for a premium when you can find one that isn't a decade old.

                  www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
                  Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
                  MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
                  Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
                  Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

                  Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
                  Miller 30-A Spoolgun
                  Miller WC-115-A
                  Miller Spectrum 300
                  Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
                  Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

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                  • #10
                    Syncrowave's are good, also take a look at the HTP InverTIG unit
                    Richard

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                    • #11
                      Syncrowave is a great machine, but I think your gravel floor is gonna be a deal killer, if you want to move it. It weighs prolly close to 500#. It's a challenge to roll mine over an electrical cord, let alone gravel.

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                      • #12
                        "Good" rarely goes with "easy" or "cheap". You're looking to move into a premium area of welding, it's not cheap or easy. There's a good reason why it's expensive to get aluminum stuff welded up properly. You could build a running rear with big, beefy wheels that will help you move a 460+ lbs syncrowave around your shop. You could look around and find yourself dial-arc HF, but it's just as heavy as a syncrowave, just not as expensive. Put it on a small trailer and move it around with a tractor. I have lots of heavy machines and I love them, but I have a concrete floor. If you have the money, snag a dynasty. Solves all your issues minus lightening your wallet.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Helios View Post
                          Syncrowave is a great machine, but I think your gravel floor is gonna be a deal killer, if you want to move it. It weighs prolly close to 500#. It's a challenge to roll mine over an electrical cord, let alone gravel.
                          Specs on a Syncrowave 210 say that it weighs 140 lbs.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MMH View Post

                            Specs on a Syncrowave 210 say that it weighs 140 lbs.
                            It's just not the same type of machine as an older syncrowave like a 250.

                            www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
                            Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
                            MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
                            Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
                            Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

                            Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
                            Miller 30-A Spoolgun
                            Miller WC-115-A
                            Miller Spectrum 300
                            Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
                            Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

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                            • #15
                              Dialarc hf is what i would suggest, it's cheap enough to get and easy enough to start out on. Nothing fancy just a big ol buzz box with spark maker and a clunky contactor inside. For hobbyists the bells and whistles are overrated.
                              Shopmaster 300
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                              Aead 200le blue charge
                              Spectrum 3080 50 foot torch

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