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  • TIG Power Supply

    My dad brought this by my shop yesterday evening. Said I could use it indefinitely (that usually means he's never coming back for it) if I wanted to try it out. The only welder I have that might be suitable (and the reason I am posting) is my Miller 212 (NOT Autoset) MIG. It's been good for me.

    Can I use my 212 as a DC power source for this rig? How would I set it up and run it? I mean the connections seem pretty straight forward, but I've never TIGed in my life, and I've never even watched a YouTube video on using one welder as the power supply for another welder. I do have a couple gas bottles, and atleast one spare flow regulator.




  • #2
    Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
    My dad brought this by my shop yesterday evening. Said I could use it indefinitely (that usually means he's never coming back for it) if I wanted to try it out. The only welder I have that might be suitable (and the reason I am posting) is my Miller 212 (NOT Autoset) MIG. It's been good for me.

    Can I use my 212 as a DC power source for this rig? How would I set it up and run it? I mean the connections seem pretty straight forward, but I've never TIGed in my life, and I've never even watched a YouTube video on using one welder as the power supply for another welder. I do have a couple gas bottles, and atleast one spare flow regulator.


    You normally need a "constant current" machine (stick welder) for TIG.

    Griff

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    • #3
      I got a pointer towards a document describing the processes and CC vs CV. This unit has an AC/DC switch on it. Does that mean I could run it off my old AC buzz box? I am reading the manual right now and it seems like it. My dad used to use it with his old Hobart DC stick welder/generator.


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      • #4
        Is that a old miller high frequency box hard to tell from the pic.
        If so you need a constant current machine to run it ac- for aluminum and dc for stainless and steel.
        I believe your machine is constant voltage only to run the mig process.D

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        • #5
          That machine will prob work on a buzz box but that buzz box will have a hard time running it those high freq boxes were ment for welder gen sets like your dad had or bigger shop stick welders with more amps.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by D Auger View Post
            Is that a old miller high frequency box hard to tell from the pic.
            If so you need a constant current machine to run it ac- for aluminum and dc for stainless and steel.
            I believe your machine is constant voltage only to run the mig process.D
            Yeah, I got that now. How about running it off of an old AC Buzz box then? Yeah, its an old Miller high frequency piggyback unit. My dad used to use it with his old Hobart DC stick welder/generator. I've got an old Lincoln AC buzz box in the corner I pretty much only use for heavier welds, and the occasional nickel rod task.

            If I can run it off of my AZ buzzbox that would be ideal. I want something I can weld thinner aluminum with a little easier than with my 212 and spool gun. 1/8" and larger is pretty easy. .08 to .125 is doable, but anything thinner I get as much hole as weld.

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            • #7
              What model is that ,maybe a h15-1 ?You can down load the manual for it on this site with the serial # also .
              It will tell you how to set it up .

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              • #8
                Originally posted by D Auger View Post
                That machine will prob work on a buzz box but that buzz box will have a hard time running it those high freq boxes were ment for welder gen sets like your dad had or bigger shop stick welders with more amps.
                I actually don't want to use it for heavy welds. My spool gun and the 212 do a decent job on Aluminum for 1/8" and larger (if a brush it well) although 3/8" and larger requires massive preheat. I'd like to know if it will be practical for the thin stuff. .04-.08. Wouldn't that require less current, or is the current to burn off the oxide still to much?
                Last edited by Bob La Londe; 01-03-2018, 06:22 PM.

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                • #9
                  The thin stuff should be ok do you have the foot pedal?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by D Auger View Post
                    The thin stuff should be ok do you have the foot pedal?
                    No. I wish I did.

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                    • #11
                      So you should have a gas valve on the torch to turn on / off the gas .And to start the torch just lift start it .Check out weldingtipsandtricks.com on YouTube Jody has some great videos on stick ,tig and mig .

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                      • #12
                        Thanks. I will. I'm also a fan of Chucke2009, but he does some stuff just to see if doing it "wrong" will work. LOL. Its been kind of cool following him from being a student to running a job shop.

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                        • #13
                          Well I got it all setup, and I think the unit is dead. I was not able to get anything that looked like a high frequency start. No hum, no whine. Nothing. By cranking up the current on the source I was able to get an arc that sustained briefly by touch starting (yuck!), but it would just vaporize the thin metal I wanted to set this up for. That's about the same result as if I just connected the torch directly to the cracker box. I may tear it apart and see if its something easy to fix, but for now the cracker box gets put back behind my air compressor to get it out of the way. Back to MIGing.

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                          • #14
                            Well I got it all setup, and I think the unit is dead. I was not able to get anything that looked like a high frequency start. No hum, no whine. Nothing. By cranking up the current on the source I was able to get an arc that sustained briefly by touch starting (yuck!), but it would just vaporize the thin metal I wanted to set this up for. That's about the same result as if I just connected the torch directly to the cracker box. I may tear it apart and see if its something easy to fix, but for now the cracker box gets put back behind my air compressor to get it out of the way. Back to MIGing.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Well I got it all setup, and I think the unit is dead. I was not able to get anything that looked like a high frequency start. No hum, no whine. Nothing. By cranking up the current on the source I was able to get an arc that sustained briefly by touch starting (yuck!), but it would just vaporize the thin metal I wanted to set this up for. That's about the same result as if I just connected the torch directly to the cracker box. I may tear it apart and see if its something easy to fix, but for now the cracker box gets put back behind my air compressor to get it out of the way. Back to MIGing.

                              Comment

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