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Will I be disappointed with a Syncrowave 210?

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  • bababouy
    replied
    Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post
    If you are going to buy a separate Mig machine then you are paying a lot for functions you will not use.

    Sync 210 is $2,839.00 ($2,639.00 w. rebate)
    Rated output on 240v: AC Tig 114Amps @ 60%. Duty Cycle

    The Lincoln SQ Wave 200 is $1,449.00
    rated output on 240v : TIG: 200A/25% TIG: 160A/40% TIG: 130A/60%


    If you only need a Tig machine the Lincoln will save you a ton of money to put towards a Mig machine.

    You mentioned AL welding- what thickness ? as that will also come into play on choosing a machine as both of these are a little lite on power for thicker AL.
    I agree with you on the sync 200 for thicker aluminum, its tough once you start welding over 1/4". I am always using a smaller tungsten and rod than what is recomended for 1/4", but I personally have used my sync 200 and a Lincoln 225 squarewave on the same parts, and the lincoln had a much lower duty cycle on DC, welding stainless close to 200 amps. The fan kicks on almost immediately and the machine kept shutting off after short welds. This was on some heavier stainless 300 series and alloy 20.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    I would buy an HTP Invertig 221 long before the Lincoln myself. Super machine and no problems, from reading all the great reviews I've seen for years now on here and other welding forums.

    Leave a comment:


  • IntrstlarOvrdrve
    replied
    Thanks for the input, that Lincoln is looking really good. I just don't like using a spool gun, so I know I'd eventually be buying a more capable MIG unit as well.

    As far as the thickness of aluminum, I really don't know since I've never welded it before. I figure I'd initially be welding sheet metal (16ga etc), I really just wanted to have a machine that I had the capability to weld aluminum with (so that I could learn).

    Leave a comment:


  • Helios
    replied
    Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post
    Sync 210 is $2,839.00 ($2,639.00 w. rebate)
    Rated output on 240v: AC Tig 114Amps @ 60%. Duty Cycle.
    Wow, that's wimpier than I would have expected. My Sync 250 is 200A at 60% duty cycle, 250A at 40% duty cycle, and a max of 310A. And the Lincoln is REALLY wimpy on aluminum.

    Last edited by Helios; 10-19-2017, 06:43 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Broccoli1
    replied
    If you are going to buy a separate Mig machine then you are paying a lot for functions you will not use.

    Sync 210 is $2,839.00 ($2,639.00 w. rebate)
    Rated output on 240v: AC Tig 114Amps @ 60%. Duty Cycle

    The Lincoln SQ Wave 200 is $1,449.00
    rated output on 240v : TIG: 200A/25% TIG: 160A/40% TIG: 130A/60%


    If you only need a Tig machine the Lincoln will save you a ton of money to put towards a Mig machine.

    You mentioned AL welding- what thickness ? as that will also come into play on choosing a machine as both of these are a little lite on power for thicker AL.
    Last edited by Broccoli1; 10-19-2017, 01:20 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Crepe Myrtle Farmer
    replied
    Miller's pricing right now is outstanding. I'm using a Diversion 180 and an older ESAB Heliarc when I do TIG work (about 10% of what I do). The 180 has some limitations regarding its presets and you might find that a problem. For chassis fab and exhaust work I do on the farm equipment and vehicles I'm restoring (11 total) I fall back on my Miller 252 MIG.

    I think the Synchowave is another outstanding TIG, sure wish I were better at it --- a company I worked for in LA (Northrop Grumman) invented TIG welding.
    Last edited by Crepe Myrtle Farmer; 10-17-2017, 09:31 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Everything wears out. It's all about return on investment vs how often you use it.
    A lot of automotive DC tig to me means I would go crazy without a fingertip control. That would mean if you used an old 330 A/BP you would need to wire a on-off button or lug around the heavy pedal they have.
    The inverter arc on Dynasties are much better IMO
    Saying that the Sync 210 is an animal I know nothing about. If it welds (arc) like a Dynasty that would be nice.
    Inverters do have a tendency to go up in smoke from time to time. Kinda like our new vehicles.
    Just realize once you are out of warranty you are on lesser borrowed time than when the old transformers would have been.
    You would be better served to find a used 350 Dynasty or a new 280 DX for your style of work and what you are looking to evolve into from my perspective.
    I borrow money (plastic) and then get what I NEED and then pay back as fast as possible with the welding money. I have gotten a LONG LONG ways doing that. A couple of good jobs can go a long ways towards a machine. Then you are sailing with real usable duty cycle.
    YMMV...... Plan A is all I have

    Leave a comment:


  • MMW
    replied
    Since some are mentioning the syncr 250 I thought I would comment on that since I have used and owned them for the last 30 years. They are great machines but are power hungry. They are best hooked to a 100 amp circuit which most people don't have in there house/garage. How ever they can be run off a 50 amp breaker at lower settings but that may not be ideal for your situation.

    As far as a sync 200 or 210 I have never used one so I can't comment but I have owned a Lincoln 175 tig and it is bullet proof. These are transformer machines so very little to go wrong.

    Leave a comment:


  • IntrstlarOvrdrve
    replied
    I have NO problem with outdated equipment, I just don't want to pay an unrealistic price for it! I also don't want to buy one offline where I can't test it in person before purchase. I'll continue to keep my eyes open for used equipment but come Christmas if I haven't found anything I'm ready to make a purchase new or used.

    Leave a comment:


  • Helios
    replied
    A Sync 250 will still be working 30 years after the Sync 210 inverter stuff is smoked.
    And a 330A/BP will still be welding 60 years after the Sync 210 is history (plus it'll weld aluminum foil...go over to WeldingWeb for proof).
    Last edited by Helios; 10-17-2017, 05:20 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    What's wrong with outdated equipment? It's my personal favorite. Some of that old stuff will be around long after we're all gone. Plus you'll have some extra cash for a plasma cutter.

    Leave a comment:


  • bababouy
    replied
    I have a 5 or 6 year old syncrwave 200 and love it. I've had bigger syncrowaves that were water cooled and an abp 300. I used a Lincoln squarewave 225 which seemed to have a shorter duty cycle. The 210 replaced the 200 and if my 200 can't be repaired, I'm giong with the 210.

    Leave a comment:


  • Will I be disappointed with a Syncrowave 210?

    Hello all, I am a hobbyist here looking for advice on my next welder purchase. I've been using a Miller Maxstar 140STR for the past 10 years probably and finally looking for upgrade. I love my little welder, but the better I've gotten (I'm self taught) the more limitations I find with it. I'm also wanting the capability to weld aluminum. As much as I'd love a dynasty 210dx or similar it's just not in the budget, I've kept a close eye on craigslist for the past year or so and anytime anything worth a darn comes up (which is rare) it's gone before I can even get off work! The only other TIG machines that seem to pop up are outdated, worn out overpriced units. I've just gotten to the point where I've decided to just buy new. I'm not as much interested in the MIG capabilities (I plan on buying a new MIG welder next year), as I'm interested in how good of a TIG welder it is? With the current "build with blue" incentives the machines are hovering around $2,500, which is in the price range I was looking to spend. I do a LOT of thin sheet metal (16, 18, 20ga) and some plate, I'm wanting to start doing more chassis fabrication. I do weld stainless, headers, exhaust etc. Will this machine fit my needs? I can't seem to find a whole lot of opinions on these machines, and since I don't plan on buying another machine for another 10 years, I want to make sure it's a solid one. Any real world experience with one? Any better options for me?
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