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My Miller Syncrowave 180 SD had died on me :(

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I think you owe your buddy a six pack.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Congratulations! Glad it's working again.

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  • tommyg
    replied
    So happy. My Miller is back up and running. As I suspected it was indeed the main controller board. My electronics repair wizard buddy repaired the board and all is well. For anyone interested it turned out to be a shorted diode. Will be interesting to see if it fails again at some point.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    A can of spray paint can fix that hood color problem. Next time just get a black one.

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  • MAC702
    replied
    Originally posted by Crepe Myrtle Farmer View Post
    ...CST 280 (heavily modified ... as the NEC calls for higher AWGs than the back panel provides...
    The NEC recognizes the differences between welding machines and typical machines. Article 630.

    You are welcome to overkill, of course.

    Leave a comment:


  • tommyg
    replied
    Thanks for all of the feedback on this. Looks like I'm going to try and repair this wonderfully component jam packed main controller PCB with help of some friends who are more qualified to trouble shoot this thing at a PCB component level than me. Will be interesting to see if we can do it and get away with just a couple of resistor, diode, cap, IC, or whatever replacements are needed to repair. If not, gonna sell it as an over glorified stick welder and get another machine that might not be blue which kinda stinks cause it matches my helmet so good
    Last edited by tommyg; 08-22-2017, 09:42 PM.

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  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Originally posted by Crepe Myrtle Farmer View Post


    You nailed that one. Although I wear overalls and boots these days, I do have a engineering degree from a really decent school in Tucson (U of A) and can't for the life of me understand what's so "proprietary" in Miller's designs --- although I haven't really kept up with the EE Profession, my guess is someone (over a couple of weekends) could easily design an open source multi-process welder that does everything the high end Lincolns, Millers, etc do.


    May be true, but the Chinese have some pretty smart engineers and they don't seem to be able to make a product that is replacing red and blue. People buy them, but seem to generally end up with one of the brand names after frustration with support and service. I'm sure there are exceptions but I'm speaking in generalities There is a lot more to a welder company than cool HW and SW. HTP, and perhaps others, may be exceptions but that is due to great support here in the USA.
    Last edited by Aeronca41; 08-18-2017, 07:54 AM.

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  • Crepe Myrtle Farmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Arizona Joe View Post

    +1 again

    While I can understand resistance to going open source hardware, I cannot understand why Miller does not provide schematics and service manuals. Inexcusable in my view. The OP is the owner of an old school machine and can't get service information. Can anyone make a good defense for Miller on the grounds of protecting intellectual property?

    Miller's high end stuff is in one class and probably does have some proprietary design features, but I can't imagine that being the case for the Diversion series and especially obsolete machines.

    The future of Miller's low end stuff will be overtaken by the Chinese. As the song goes, it's just a matter of time.

    Cheers

    You nailed that one. Although I wear overalls and boots these days, I do have a engineering degree from a really decent school in Tucson (U of A) and can't for the life of me understand what's so "proprietary" in Miller's designs --- although I haven't really kept up with the EE Profession, my guess is someone (over a couple of weekends) could easily design an open source multi-process welder that does everything the high end Lincolns, Millers, etc do.



    Leave a comment:


  • shootist2
    replied
    Had my 330 for sale, going to keep it now. Not going to buy crap that can't be fixed. 35 years and the 330 has never hic upped.

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  • Arizona Joe
    replied
    Originally posted by Crepe Myrtle Farmer View Post

    I use my UK-made Pico Tech lapscope and my tablet to troubleshoot all sorts of problems on the tractors, have tried same with the Miller circuit boards but not having the schematic makes it challenging. I realize Miller is trying to protect proprietary tech (don't understand why as welders are relatively simple inverters, control tech), but somebody is going to design/build an "open source" multi-process welding box and watch as people flock to it.
    +1 again

    While I can understand resistance to going open source hardware, I cannot understand why Miller does not provide schematics and service manuals. Inexcusable in my view. The OP is the owner of an old school machine and can't get service information. Can anyone make a good defense for Miller on the grounds of protecting intellectual property?

    Miller's high end stuff is in one class and probably does have some proprietary design features, but I can't imagine that being the case for the Diversion series and especially obsolete machines.

    The future of Miller's low end stuff will be overtaken by the Chinese. As the song goes, it's just a matter of time.

    Cheers

    Leave a comment:


  • Crepe Myrtle Farmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Arizona Joe View Post

    +1

    I would go a step further and suggest that Miller provide the service manual, schematics, gerber files, and BOM, to anyone. In other words, make the boards "open source hardware." Miller customers already pay a premium for the machine. They ought not get ripped off for service. The old VW bugs were rather expensive per/pound, but service and, especially parts, were dirt cheap.

    Open source hardware sounds crazy, but it isn't. The Arduino board is open source. Hence, you can buy a clone of it from some manufacturer for half the price of a genuine Arduino. However, folks often will pay the premium for a genuine version so as not to waste time with a faulty clone.

    The suits running Miller should to take note as the future of at least their lower end products is in peril. JMHO, but someone has to say it.

    Cheers

    I'm familiar with all you've talked about and Arduino is very very popular within the science community. Kids can "bread board" and "brass board" much with that tech.

    As for the Miller circuit boards, I have green and orange tractors that are becoming increasingly "computerized" too, but those companies do, in fact, provide service manuals that allow us to get down to the "component" level for repairs.

    I use my UK-made Pico Tech lapscope and my tablet to troubleshoot all sorts of problems on the tractors, have tried same with the Miller circuit boards but not having the schematic makes it challenging. I realize Miller is trying to protect proprietary tech (don't understand why as welders are relatively simple inverters, control tech), but somebody is going to design/build an "open source" multi-process welding box and watch as people flock to it.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    That sir, is the number one reason why I haven't sold my old thunderbolt.

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  • Aeronca41
    replied
    ...which is why Ryan pays close attention to the care and feeding of his well-aged but always faithful Helga! I agree about the computers-I love the tricks my Dynasty 200 can do, but it is the only inverter (and computerized) machine I own. The trusty old MM200 just keeps chuggin' along, and I took advantage of the closeout sale to get an old transformer style MM211 for portability before they were all gone. And when all the rest are dead and gone, the old thunderbolt will still be welding just like it always has-certainly gonna outlast me!

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I agree with Wayne complete and disagree with the farmer and Joe. I want my stuff to be less confuserized and more robust. Less delicate parts and more old school reliability. But there is no going back. Plus it's hard to argue with the adjustability and functionality of the new stuff. I am in agreement that making things more affordable to repair would surely make life easier for us out here working and less terrifying when stuff breaks. And stuff will break.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    There are third party board repair companies but the success rate doesn't seem to be 100%.

    Leave a comment:

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