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  • Dynasty 280DX Failure (faulty electronics?)

    Has anyone else had issues with their Dynasty 280DX? I did some searching and saw that more than one person had the main board fail while the machine was still under warranty. Unfortunately mine just failed only a few months after the warranty expired. The machine has worked flawless since it was purchased in February of 2014. I used it the other day and it was working great, then would not turn on the day after that. I have zero power in the machine and the display does not work either. I checked the outlet and circuit breaker to find that both were working, also tested my other Lincoln mig welder to confirm.

    After speaking with one of the techs at Miller over the phone, he instructed me to check the voltage on a few different connectors on the circuit boards. The first 5 or 6 different pins he had me check did not read any voltage whatsoever. Finally one of the connectors was supposed to read in the range of 460V DC when I was only getting 160V DC to the two pins. He then told me the main board was bad ($1300 alone). Since some of the other boards were not reading any power, there is no guarantee that the machine will work after spending $1300 on the main board. It could cost even more to fix.

    I cannot justify spending that much money to repair this machine only to hope it works. Even at that point, how much longer will it work for? Right now I cannot finish any welding jobs and ive had to turn away work since this is my only tig machine. Im at the point where im going to consider buying an Everlast machine just so I can continue working.

    Ive owned a Dynasty 200DX previously that was purchased used. That machine lasted me 6 years and the new owner has been using it for another 3 with no issues. I also own a Spectrum 375 which works great after 4-5 years of use. I think its absurd that I buy a brand new 280DX thinking im getting a better machine, and it completely fails just after the 3yr warranty. Is only 3 years really how long Miller expects their machines to last???

    I cant see what I could have possibly done wrong to cause the machine to fail. It has been plugged into the same outlet since I opened the box. I keep the machine extremely clean and it could literally pass for brand new. The only scratch on it is the side sticker which was there when I received it brand new from Miller!

    Any help would be greatly appreciated, because as of right now, I have a $5k paperweight.

    20170808_025250 by Dominic Biro, on Flickr

    20170808_025752 by Dominic Biro, on Flickr

    20170808_025816 by Dominic Biro, on Flickr













  • #2
    I would buy a second machine now.
    Machine only.
    Then I would repair the other one and once proven sell it.
    Done that twice with my 200dx's
    IMO that's the cost of doing business and a genuine expense.
    Worth the risk too. Once you weld with a pos Everlast
    you will be much wiser.
    This I know. They don't weld near as nice. And they go bad sometimes too. And no fun to get fixed.
    I can make that $1800 back in a week and break even and in a month have the other machine sold and recover a good bit of my money.
    I consider it a risk I take with all inverter products.
    It's a risk I am willing to take for superior welds.
    Buy 6 welders of any brand and you won't get the service or performance that you get with Miller.

    www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
    Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
    MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
    Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
    Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

    Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
    Miller 30-A Spoolgun
    Miller WC-115-A
    Miller Spectrum 300
    Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
    Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

    Comment


    • #3
      Really unfortunate about the main board, but given the machine's overall price (many times that) you can understand why so expensive. With the equipment I have, I try to troubleshoot down to the "component level", but that's becoming increasingly difficult to diagnose/repair especially with multi-layering and the tight component layouts.

      You would think that with advances in silk screening, PCB manufacturing techniques, etc (which have driven design/production costs much lower) an "aftermarket" or "cottage industry" hasn't sprung up to offer alternatives that don't violate patents, if any. Inverters and associated control technologies are everywhere (not just in welding).

      ESAB TIG 252 with Miller CoolMate
      Spectrum 875
      Diversion 180
      Oxy-A (Harris, ESAB, Ox Weld)
      Miller 252
      MM 211
      CST 280
      Trailblazer - Kubota

      http://www.blackdiamondblooms.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        Problem is, I dont think its going to be an easy fix. After troubleshooting, it looks like multiple boards are bad. Also some boards HAVE to be replaced first to even further diagnose the issue. I cant see spending more than half the cost of the machine to fix it and MAYBE it will work? Who knows how long it will last after that? If the machine is just going to fail for no reason, who knows what else can go bad in the future? Its really a shame because Miller now offers a 5yr warranty on parts. Pretty ridiculous they can do nothing for me when the machine I purchased brand new completely fails only a few months after the 3yr warranty is up. The tech even originally stated it was a year past its warranty when I have the receipt from purchasing it in Feb 2014 shortly after the 280DX came out!

        Comment


        • #5
          Check to see if they have a consumer relations dept. call or email them send them your invoice to verify that it's only a couple of months out. They may give you the parts and you pay labor??
          Pete

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by dmnteng View Post
            Problem is, I dont think its going to be an easy fix. After troubleshooting, it looks like multiple boards are bad. ...
            IMO it is unlikely that multiple boards are out. I would trace input power wires to the power supply (PS) they go to. Then with the machine on see if the PS voltages look OK. The hardest working modules, like the PS, are most likely to fail. Ask Miller what to look for. In your pix, those two big black capacitors at the top of the photo look a bit puffy. There is a set of four of them. The two lower ones don't look puffy.

            OK, I'm flailing the wind. Still, since so much of the machine is not functioning, the problem is likely upstream, and the PS is probably the most upstream component.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Arizona Joe View Post

              IMO it is unlikely that multiple boards are out. I would trace input power wires to the power supply (PS) they go to. Then with the machine on see if the PS voltages look OK. The hardest working modules, like the PS, are most likely to fail. Ask Miller what to look for. In your pix, those two big black capacitors at the top of the photo look a bit puffy. There is a set of four of them. The two lower ones don't look puffy.

              OK, I'm flailing the wind. Still, since so much of the machine is not functioning, the problem is likely upstream, and the PS is probably the most upstream component.
              All 4 capacitors look the same, it might just be the angle of the pic. Measuring the diameter with a caliper they range from 1.580-1.583 and no signs of anything getting too hot and or bad connections on the board. I have 240VAC going into the main board. Connector RC40 which goes across two different boards was not reading any of the specified DC voltages by the Miller tech I spoke with. I then tested other connectors which were not reading any power either. After finally testing connector RC30, it only had 160VDC when the tech told me it should have in the range of 460VDC, which then determined the main board was bad and needs to be replaced to further diagnose.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dmnteng View Post
                I have 240VAC going into the main board. Connector RC40 which goes across two different boards was not reading any of the specified DC voltages by the Miller tech I spoke with. I then tested other connectors which were not reading any power either. After finally testing connector RC30, it only had 160VDC when the tech told me it should have in the range of 460VDC, which then determined the main board was bad and needs to be replaced to further diagnose.
                Is RC 30 an output from PC1 and in input to PC7? If so, I would try disconnecting RC30 and measuring the voltage off PC1. PC 7 could be loading down the voltage to 160 V. If RC30 reads 160V with PC7 disconnected, then it probably is PC1, or if it reads 460V then it is PC7.


                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by dmnteng View Post

                  I think its absurd that I buy a brand new 280DX thinking im getting a better machine, and it completely fails just after the 3yr warranty. Is only 3 years really how long Miller expects their machines to last???
                  You hit the nail on the head! I too feel like the inverter is NOT better since they don't last near as long. Hence why I haven't jumped on the inverter band wagon.
                  I have enough blown IGBTs from wind turbine inverters in my work area that I can fill the bed of a pickup truck up!

                  Originally posted by dmnteng View Post

                  I cant see what I could have possibly done wrong to cause the machine to fail. It has been plugged into the same outlet since I opened the box. I keep the machine extremely clean and it could literally pass for brand new. The only scratch on it is the side sticker which was there when I received it brand new from Miller!
                  Right there could be part of your problem. If your welder is not disconnected from the power source, then you are susceptible to power surges which can reek havoc on your boards.

                  The installation manuals even show to install a disconnect switch to cut power to the welder between usage.
                  On the bright side, you Really did take care of that welder. Reminds me of how I keep mine looking. So if you sell it, you'll be able to fetch a better price.


                  Comment


                  • #10
                    When a TIG machine breaks down that I need for my shop work, I take it 45 miles to an established repair shop
                    that is factory authorized for miller, lincoln, TD, Esab, etc. They've got the experience, knowledge, skills and parts
                    to either fix it or tell me to get another unit. Either way, I've already bit the bullet and am prepared for the cost.
                    My biz is fabrication, not welder repair.
                    Futzing around trying to fix the welder on the cheap, on my time; while the shop work suffers is just compounding
                    the cost of the breakdown.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have a Dynasty 280DX 3/10/13. So far, smooth sailing. I like Dave's response. I'm an electrician, I'm good at my field of expertise, I take welder problems to people skilled in welder repair. I've never met an expert who steered me down a bad path. Ask their advice.

                      Willie
                      Dynasty 280DX
                      Bobcat 250
                      MM252
                      Spool gun
                      Twentieth Century 295
                      Twentieth Century 295 AC
                      Marquette spot welder
                      Smith torches

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by clint738 View Post

                        You hit the nail on the head! I too feel like the inverter is NOT better since they don't last near as long. Hence why I haven't jumped on the inverter band wagon.
                        I have enough blown IGBTs from wind turbine inverters in my work area that I can fill the bed of a pickup truck up!



                        Right there could be part of your problem. If your welder is not disconnected from the power source, then you are susceptible to power surges which can reek havoc on your boards.

                        The installation manuals even show to install a disconnect switch to cut power to the welder between usage.
                        On the bright side, you Really did take care of that welder. Reminds me of how I keep mine looking. So if you sell it, you'll be able to fetch a better price.

                        I have had my Lincoln Mig as well as my Dynasty 200DX that I had before the 280DX on the same circuit for over 7 years and no issues with a power surge.

                        I had the machined checked out, and as I suspected the main board as well as another board have failed and its totaling over $2000 in repairs. Miller does not want to cover it at all. Its really unfortunate because their current warranty covers the electronics for 5 years now.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          As expensive as it is, $2000 to get your machine repaired is cheaper than buying a new one, and it would not be chasing good money after bad by buying an Everlast. The only thing I would suggest is that you insist that the service tech returns the bad boards to you. Then someone would have a chance of fixing the old ones.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            My dynasty 210 dx came out of the box not working sounds like the same problem I had...not sure is the 280 is the same but I was told it was the PC5 board my ne something to look into

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
                              I would buy a second machine now.
                              Machine only.
                              Then I would repair the other one and once proven sell it.
                              Done that twice with my 200dx's
                              IMO that's the cost of doing business and a genuine expense.
                              Worth the risk too. Once you weld with a pos Everlast
                              you will be much wiser.
                              This I know. They don't weld near as nice. And they go bad sometimes too. And no fun to get fixed.
                              I can make that $1800 back in a week and break even and in a month have the other machine sold and recover a good bit of my money.
                              I consider it a risk I take with all inverter products.
                              It's a risk I am willing to take for superior welds.
                              Buy 6 welders of any brand and you won't get the service or performance that you get with Miller.
                              OMG, You can't be serious with that kind of logic are you? I bought a Diversion 180. It's 5 years old. Maybe 10 hours on it. 2 main boards later, A new foot pedal. I'm into it for $3500 Divided x10 hours. That's $350 an hour. It's a hobby welder. Cost of doing business!! Hmmmm. We put a roll bar in a car and a few aluminum jobs and pretty much throw away machine. Where is the electronic protection on these machines to save the main boards when there stressed? Build a machine that works. How hard is that..

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