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Air Compressor Tank Hairline Crack Repair

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  • H80N
    replied
    Yea.....Life is too interesting to end it early with a BIG-BADDA-BOOM..!!!

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  • scootertom2
    replied
    Everyone, Thanks for all the inputs and advice! I guess I always want to fix things and not throw repairable stuff away, but it sounds like the risks may not outweigh the benefits in this case. And in case anyone is interested, this was a Harbor Freight 60 gal compressor that was well maintained and was used in a picture framing shop to power their air tools. Thanks again for the prompt response! Regards, Tom (scootertom2)

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  • John T
    replied
    Can't blame you for wanting to fix it we all want to do that. HOWEVER this is not the thing to fix.
    The way it was explained to me was when you test with fluid (Hydro test) if it leaks the pressure subsides upon rupture as fluid cannot be compressed while the volumizing nature of the air keeps expanding and expanding catastrophically. Google explosive power of compressed air.Great video on you tube where air compressor explodes fella recues his grandfather after very lucky...very convincing.

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  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Those prices from the link Meltedmetal posted are WAY cheaper than a trip to the hospital--or the undertaker. A no-brainer.

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  • Synchroman
    replied
    I certainly agree with comments saying that the tank should be scrapped. It's not worth the risk.

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  • Meltedmetal
    replied
    For comparison- https://www.compressorworld.com/air-...ith-top-plate/

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  • tackit
    replied
    Sounds like the metal has work hardened from the vibration of the motor, it likely will crack someplace else. Not worth it, pass on fixing it.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Well, Scooter, what have you decided to do?

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  • FusionKing
    replied
    Had a friend who worked at a plant where they made air tanks. He went on and on about destructive testing.
    My son Darryll worked at Modine when they were here and they tested radiators. They were in a huge water tank when they blew from testing, and it still was very crazy when they blew.
    A cracked 60 gallon tank is nothing but a cheap grenade. It will blow all your windows out and shrapnel will fly all over.
    Don't be a dumbass.
    The only way that could be properly fixed would be to replace that entire section and then be re-certified. Not cost effective. Probably overseas garbage anyways.

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  • Burnt hands
    replied
    I would buy a new tank and make a BBQ or fire pit out of the old one.so all is not lost.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    A catastrophic failure of an air compressor tank can kill you, my friend. I don't even like having the compressor tank inside my shop. It's one of the tools I plan to move to the outside tool shed attached to my shop....which is another project on the list....

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  • D Auger
    replied
    Wow !!And don't forget to drain them !

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  • xryan
    replied
    Buy a new tank, it already failed, send it to the scrap bin.

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  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by duaneb55 View Post
    Ever see the results of an air tank exploding? Is it worth your life/limb or that of a bystander?

    If you were an ASME certified welder it would possibly be another matter but then I doubt you'd be asking your questions if you were.

    Back when I was MUCH younger and didn't know any better, I used an old water tank as an air tank and welded compressor/engine brackets and mounting feet on it. Had the unit mounted in my 12' enclosed service van and fortunately it never ruptured. Knowing what I know now I would never do that again and I know of older air tanks that had internal corrosion that caused them to rupture and blow garages apart. Nothing to mess around with.

    Replace the tank and make a BBQ pit/grill out of the old one.
    BOOM....!!!

    I Agree 200% Lots of energy there to maim or kill.....

    ALSO no way of knowing how rusted and thin the tank is on the inside

    here are some pics

    https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/...&hsimp=yhs-001



    That crack may just be an indicator of how poor the overall tank condition really is.....

    could have it hydro tested...........after welding... probably fail

    FOOD FOR THOUGHT

    150 PSI Tank pressure X 144 .... will give you 21,600 pounds force per Square Foot of tank surface

    I would hate to unleash that on a human body at tank rupture
    Last edited by H80N; 02-22-2017, 03:52 PM.

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  • MMW
    replied
    I think Duane may be right in saying if you have to ask then maybe you shouldn't be doing this? If it was mine I would tig it up using filler rod. Open the valve so it can't pressurize while welding. Only you know your skill level.

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