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MM252 Recommended Mig settings for 3/16" steel joints?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
    Looks too hot to me.
    I wouldn't call that a high bead profile.
    You are talking about travel speed being higher than stick makes me raise an eyebrow pretty quick.
    Miller used to say the door setting was for a "T" joint. That requires more heat than most.
    Not really sure what it is you are trying to accomplish here, but simply looking at the "V" shape to your bead, and the end crater shape, tells me you are simply flying to the point of barely being able to keep up with it. If it was say 1/2" thick, then maybe I would say in one pass that was a look I would want.
    When I look at my 350P chart I go down one full metal thickness size on the chart than recommended for my starting point, just because they want it so stinkin' hot.
    As far as your "gap" goes......I don't believe you really need that because that would be really thin there anyway.
    I see my advice may be completely 180 degrees from what you may or may not think. I just know how I get the bead appearance I like to see.
    I would like more pics up close and some of the back side too.
    On those first welds I would have been more inclined to turn the part completely upside down for that joint. It would have burned in lots nicer without worry of loosing the edge.
    Just my observations. I hope that helps some. Play with scrap (like Mac said)
    Sadly, the piece of material tacked on top was my practice piece to try to get my heat set and have a place to attach my ground.
    I ran beads at different settings.. voltage and wire feed and then would look at the heat signature made on the back of the plate.

    After about 2 beads I'd quench that practice plate with water cool it back down, so I didn't get a false indication of enough penetration from the plate heating up.

    If no heat signature was present, I'd turn up the machine. So I guess that may be why it seems hot. I just don't trust Mig enough to see a pretty weld and know it has good penetration.

    Ideally, I'm shooting for passes that would resemble 7018 stick welds in appearance.



    If I knew any welders that did this for a living nearby... I'd buy them a case of beer if they watch me lay some beads and help me get this Mig dialed in.

    Really looking to learn how to acid etch welds too if I can score a horizontal band saw to dice coupons up.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
      Looks too hot to me.
      I wouldn't call that a high bead profile.
      You are talking about travel speed being higher than stick makes me raise an eyebrow pretty quick.
      Miller used to say the door setting was for a "T" joint. That requires more heat than most.
      Not really sure what it is you are trying to accomplish here, but simply looking at the "V" shape to your bead, and the end crater shape, tells me you are simply flying to the point of barely being able to keep up with it. If it was say 1/2" thick, then maybe I would say in one pass that was a look I would want.
      When I look at my 350P chart I go down one full metal thickness size on the chart than recommended for my starting point, just because they want it so stinkin' hot.
      As far as your "gap" goes......I don't believe you really need that because that would be really thin there anyway.
      I see my advice may be completely 180 degrees from what you may or may not think. I just know how I get the bead appearance I like to see.
      I would like more pics up close and some of the back side too.
      On those first welds I would have been more inclined to turn the part completely upside down for that joint. It would have burned in lots nicer without worry of loosing the edge.
      Just my observations. I hope that helps some. Play with scrap (like Mac said)
      This is the weld I was thinking had a high bead profile... wasn't sure if you saw this one, or the last one where it was a corner joint with a gap running down hill.





      I didn't really have a lot of material overhang to consider it like a true overhead T-joint.... but it was too much material overhang to just do a straight horizontal weld.. Laid it down and welded it flat after getting tired of the weld bead seeming too high.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by clint738 View Post

        This is the weld I was thinking had a high bead profile... wasn't sure if you saw this one, or the last one where it was a corner joint with a gap running down hill.
        I didn't really have a lot of material overhang to consider it like a true overhead T-joint.... but it was too much material overhang to just do a straight horizontal weld.. Laid it down and welded it flat after getting tired of the weld bead seeming too high.
        That is what I called your first welds in my post. I would've flipped it over. Strange joint but still doable. Even good guys would complain about welding that one.

        www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
        Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
        MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
        Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
        Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

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        • #19
          Cut some scrap. Make some joints. Don't practice out in the middle of a sheet. That means nothing. Try 18 volts and 200 wire feed. Then work your way hotter to a balance of control comfort and penetration.

          www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
          Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
          MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
          Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
          Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

          Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
          Miller 30-A Spoolgun
          Miller WC-115-A
          Miller Spectrum 300
          Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
          Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

          Comment

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