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Breathing in smoke from welding...

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  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Just had the greatest conversation with a young guy I taught to weld a couple of years ago. Great kid, great work ethic. He works in a garage now and does mig welding there as needed. I put a strong focus on safety with him making sure he wore PPE. Told me this afternoon that now he really appreciates the importance of full face protection. Had a 4 1/2" grinding wheel disintegrate this week. Good quality wheel but just blew up without warning. Said he was really glad he was wearing eye and face protection. It only takes once to drive it home!

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  • Oldgrandad
    replied
    I've been doing this for over 40 years now been thru safety programs several times at multiple companies and I know better. But have been slacking off the past few years with the respirator. A big thank you for this thread. I'm wearing mine now every time I strike an arc or fire up a grinder. Ear plugs that's different, never stopped using those. My ears ring 24/7 it's never quite. So people use your hearing protection also. The ringing I have was caused by loud music and the noise of a shop. So work wise and preserve your health you only get one ride on this merry-go-round.

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  • SLP82
    replied
    I am really glad this helped some people think about the future and stick a half mask on more often, seriously made my day

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  • xryan
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    I have been sick as a dog from galvanized fumes. The last time was several years ago, I was scrapping a large galvanized frame, outside, good solid wind blowing while I was cutting that thing up with a torch. I was so sick that night, I call poison control, told the nice lady what kind of dumb thing I was doing. She called it metal fume fever and I had ever single symptom she listed....uncontrollable shakes, cold chills followed by cold sweats, joint pain, headache, difficulty taking a deep breath, and on and on. Really, there is no treatment outside of fluids. If I hadn't called poison control, I was going to the ER. Not fun.
    Been there, done that, not cool. Never again.

    Leave a comment:


  • nfinch86
    replied
    Originally posted by nfinch86 View Post
    In 1970 & part of 71, I welded Galv. Ski-Do trailers & boat trailers. ( 100% of what we welded was " Galvanized )
    No, external or internal ventilation was in the shop.
    It looked just like a snow storm , from the Zinc floating in the air, I could hardly see across the " Small Shop ".

    Sick all the time, you almost become used to it.

    47yrs. ago there was little to zero safety like now.

    I was young and didn't know **** about the dangers of breathing that sh*t.
    Well, now I'm paying for it .

    Norm
    It's worth reading again - All Weldors !

    Leave a comment:


  • Oldgrandad
    replied
    THANK YOU FOR THIS THREAD!! and everyone who has posted in it . Over the years I have been good and bad about using breathing protection. I now run the fab department for the company I'm at now. I have been lax about enforcing the use of breathing protection. Not any more, I have shone the info in this thread to the other welders here (all both of them) and enforced that with what I already knew. We will all be more diligent about wearing our 3M respirator masks with the 2097 filters. I have gone thru training on the proper way to test fit these and other masks and thought it would good to share a little of that with all of you. To check that the mask is on properly cover the exhaust with your hand and blow out softly the mask will expand out if the seal is good there will be no leaks, then with the filters off cover both inlets and inhale lightly the mask should suck into your face. If it doesn't check the exhaust valve.

    Aeronca I remember washing my hands in MEK and didn't think anything about it. Now here in California you can't even buy it for industrial use. We also used tri-chlor as a parts wash hate to think of the damage that did. But we simply didn't know any better.

    Here we use the new ceramic sanding discs from Norton. The warning label in the box states that this product WILL cause respiratory problems not might but will. Another reason to use to use breathing protection.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Originally posted by nfinch86 View Post

    Yes, Well , i guess my future does not look bright.

    My late wife and my son in-law both died from pancreadic cancer, " Nor a Pretty Sight "

    Oh well , one day at a time .
    What's done is done !

    Norm
    Sorry to hear about your wife and son-in-law. Have a friend dealing with pancreatic cancer now. Not good.

    I often think of all the electronic parts I cleaned with carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethane back in the 60s. We just didn't know any better. (I remember painting cars with a handkerchief over my nose! Try that today with isocyanate paints and you'll likely never do another) Breathed and touched a lot of that stuff-don't do it any more, but, as you say, what's done is done.
    Last edited by Aeronca41; 01-25-2017, 07:09 PM. Reason: Typo fix

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Seems that some guys don't wear the ear plugs and safety glasses and, in this case, a respirator for fear of being called a wuss. I've been there myself, but now I don't care. I like my hearing. I like my sight. I prefer to have lungs that aren't in trouble. I do enough damage to myself with the garbage I already eat, drink and breathe in on a daily basis, I don't need any help making it worse.

    Leave a comment:


  • Olivero
    replied
    Seriously, we as the young new generation entering the trade which I am part of. We tend to develop the frame of mind that all these bad things won't happen to us, its really stupid, I am glad you guys are here to knock some sense into us.

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  • nfinch86
    replied
    Young people coming into the trade , have much more awareness than we did 50yrs. ago.

    Safety procedures are there. Please use them !!!!!!!!!

    Norm

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  • nfinch86
    replied
    Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post
    My dad stick-welded very complex (lots of welds) bus-size stainless pollution control ash collectors for steel mills for years back in the 50's, along with all the other welding fumes that go along with 40+ years of welding. Never a thought way back then of respirators or supplied air. Passed away in '02 - cancer in lungs, stomach, liver, pancreas, and peritoneal lining. Don't breath that stuff!
    Yes, Well , i guess my future does not look bright.

    My late wife and my son in-law both died from pancreadic cancer, " Nor a Pretty Sight "

    Oh well , one day at a time .
    What's done is done !

    Norm

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    My dad stick-welded very complex (lots of welds) bus-size stainless pollution control ash collectors for steel mills for years back in the 50's, along with all the other welding fumes that go along with 40+ years of welding. Never a thought way back then of respirators or supplied air. Passed away in '02 - cancer in lungs, stomach, liver, pancreas, and peritoneal lining. Don't breath that stuff!

    Leave a comment:


  • nfinch86
    replied
    In 1970 & part of 71, I welded Galv. Ski-Do trailers & boat trailers. ( 100% of what we welded was " Galvanized )
    No, external or internal ventilation was in the shop.
    It looked just like a snow storm , from the Zinc floating in the air, I could hardly see across the " Small Shop ".

    Sick all the time, you almost become used to it.

    47yrs. ago there was little to zero safety like now.

    I was young and didn't know **** about the dangers of breathing that sh*t.
    Well, now I'm paying for it .

    Norm
    Last edited by nfinch86; 01-25-2017, 06:03 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Wait just one dadgum second. If the wives aren't there, who's runnin to fetch you another beer? I'd die of thirst I guess.<br />
    <br />
    I have been sick as a dog from galvanized fumes. The last time was several years ago, I was scrapping a large galvanized frame, outside, good solid wind blowing while I was cutting that thing up with a torch. I was so sick that night, I call poison control, told the nice lady what kind of dumb thing I was doing. She called it metal fume fever and I had ever single symptom she listed....uncontrollable shakes, cold chills followed by cold sweats, joint pain, headache, difficulty taking a deep breath, and on and on. Really, there is no treatment outside of fluids. If I hadn't called poison control, I was going to the ER. Not fun.

    Leave a comment:


  • Burnt hands
    replied
    Most of my work involves tig so I don't encounter a lot of smoke or fumes.

    Having said that, after reading up on welding galvanized steel and the
    associated fumes from the zinc and issues with hexavalent chromium with stainless,
    I figured my lungs and health are worth spending $30.

    Don't know if this will work on other nasty gas types but I may bring it
    to my friend's house when we all get together to watch the Super Bowl.
    They tend to eat a lot of chili and other gas producing foods along with the usual assorted beers.
    After over 19 years of Super Bowl parties at their homes, a compromise has been reached.
    The wives go out shopping while the men watch the game.
    Saves lots of arguments and the women often spend less shopping than what the men pay for food
    and beer.
    I won't complain one bit.

    LPR-100™ Half Mask, S/M
    https://www.millerwelds.com/safety/r...irators-m00469

    Leave a comment:

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