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  • Engine Starter Mount Repair

    Just purchased a wrecked Ford Van (major body damage, little mechanical damage other than the attached photo) and would like to re-use the engine. It is a 5.4L with a broken starter mounting -- no internal engine lubrication, cooling involved, just the exterior "lip" on the rear of the engine that is cracked / broken. I typically MIG weld my projects but understand stick or oxy/acetylene would be better on this --- can someone recommend an approach?

  • #2
    Cast iron block I suspect...MIG welding would not be indicated I'd say. For cast repairs I'm a fan of tig brazing with aluminum bronze. I've had a lot of success with that process. Never done what you're doing though.

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    • #3
      Caterpillar has a repair kit (or used to) that worked great for what you want to do. I think it's was called Lock-n-Stitch or something like that. I'm sure it was just a reboxed kit.

      Oh look, Google to the rescue.
      http://www.locknstitch.com/index.html

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
        Cast iron block I suspect...MIG welding would not be indicated I'd say. For cast repairs I'm a fan of tig brazing with aluminum bronze. I've had a lot of success with that process. Never done what you're doing though.
        Ryan - Is that done with DC Tig ?

        Norm
        www.normsmobilewelding.blogspot.com

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        • #5
          You can, I'd use AC because of the aluminum content. I might use DC if I was gonna use silicon bronze. The cleaning action also seems to help burn out the nasties. <br />
          <br />
          I'm about to do a cast iron repair as well, but it's non-critical, so I might do some experimenting.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
            You can, I'd use AC because of the aluminum content. I might use DC if I was gonna use silicon bronze. The cleaning action also seems to help burn out the nasties. <br />
            <br />
            I'm about to do a cast iron repair as well, but it's non-critical, so I might do some experimenting.
            OK, Thanks. The reason I asked is because I just bought the MM 215 & It's DC Tig only.

            Norm
            www.normsmobilewelding.blogspot.com

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            • #7
              go with silicon bronze then. And use a gas lense if you have them. That bronze gets pretty nasty from the heat unless you have excellent shielding gas coverage.

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              • #8
                Thanks to everyone for the responses.

                I was hoping I could possibly braze it with my oxy/acetylene gear but that's looking doubtful. I don't own a stick or TIG (have 100s of hrs on my MIG however) and from what I've heard about nickel rods on stick they're awfully expensive. So it looks like I'm in the market for a new TIG welder. It will have to be an "entry" type as I'd only use it every so often and the Diversion 180 seems like a good possibility. My limited research on the "bronzing" with TIG seems to indicate I can do multiple passes since the 180 only goes to 3/16".

                I'm fuzzy about my welds (with MIG) -- insist on even sized "stacked dimes" . It looks like TIG makes this even easier.

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                • #9
                  You could probably braze it with O&A. I wouldn't try, but that's because I have TIG machines and I've never done it. <br />
                  <br />
                  The idea is to not melt the base metal. That's why I'm not a fan of "welding" cast. I have, and I've been successful at it. Used 309 stainless tig wire. <br />
                  <br />
                  I don't know if that lock-n-stitch thing is the answer either. It looks pretty cool, it's expensive too. Has anyone here ever used one!

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                  • #10
                    So I did some old cast iron repair experimenting today. Had an old as dirt cast iron pot lid that was busted up. Had some ancient braze repairs which gave me fits. I used tig braze with a standard cup and a large gas lense, both #8 cups, with aluminum bronze, both AC and DC, silicon bronze both AC and DC and some 309 stainless. Hands down, the 309 looked the best. But I'd question the holding power at the toes of the welds. It would probably be fine for a pot lid, but I wanted to keep playing. Without a doubt the aluminum bronze on AC with a large gas lense was the best running and best looking of the braze joints. <br />
                    <br />
                    Ran the balance between 70 and 90...found 70 to be a nicer weld. Ran the balance between 80 and 120, settled on 90 as it seemed to run the best. All of it flowing around 15 cfh on the argon. <br />
                    <br />
                    Before starting I ran the Rose bud around on it until my spit sizzled anywhere I spit. <br />
                    <br />
                    Love my tig finger. <br />
                    <br />
                    So, I pretty much had the outcome I expected, but sometimes it's good just to mess around and refresh on why you do what you do. <br />
                    <br />
                    The end.

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                    • #11
                      Valuable info. Thanks, Ryan.

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                      • #12
                        I meant to say ran the frequency between 80 and 120, but the forum won't let me edit it....so there ya go.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                          So I did some old cast iron repair experimenting today. Had an old as dirt cast iron pot lid that was busted up. Had some ancient braze repairs which gave me fits. I used tig braze with a standard cup and a large gas lense, both #8 cups, with aluminum bronze, both AC and DC, silicon bronze both AC and DC and some 309 stainless. Hands down, the 309 looked the best. But I'd question the holding power at the toes of the welds. It would probably be fine for a pot lid, but I wanted to keep playing. Without a doubt the aluminum bronze on AC with a large gas lense was the best running and best looking of the braze joints. <br />
                          <br />
                          Ran the balance between 70 and 90...found 70 to be a nicer weld. Ran the balance between 80 and 120, settled on 90 as it seemed to run the best. All of it flowing around 15 cfh on the argon. <br />
                          <br />
                          Before starting I ran the Rose bud around on it until my spit sizzled anywhere I spit. <br />
                          <br />
                          Love my tig finger. <br />
                          <br />
                          So, I pretty much had the outcome I expected, but sometimes it's good just to mess around and refresh on why you do what you do. <br />
                          <br />
                          The end.

                          That "old" stuff is even more challenging (high carbon). I'm now looking for a TIG machine to fix this newer grey cast iron (lower carbon content) engine starter mount. I think Miller is coming out with new incentives and some new 180-related stuff. Can't beat having AC TIG for balancing/cleaning.

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                          • #14
                            Cast iron rods are really, really expensive. I have repaired cast iron with stainless before, I think I either used 308 or 316 for a drill press foot. Still standing, despite the beating it gets.
                            if there's a welder, there's a way

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Olivero View Post
                              Cast iron rods are really, really expensive. I have repaired cast iron with stainless before, I think I either used 308 or 316 for a drill press foot. Still standing, despite the beating it gets.
                              Olivero --- I think it's outright gouging on the nickel alloy rods. Lincoln's 55 rods are priced out of this world. I'm going the TIG route (based on recommendations here which I sincerely appreciate) and looking forward to seeing what Miller has in its next set of rebates / incentives ---- think they come out next week, plus I've heard a new 180 type machine is in the works or will be available soon (saving up my pennies).

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