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Welding a section into a truck frame

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  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Sounds like you are doing OK. Couldn't tell from your original post your level of experience. No attempt to put you down, just concern if you were a complete newbie on your own potentially headed for trouble. Hope you get it fixed. Great advice from Forced_Firebird. I have used those techniques quite successfully.

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  • steelwarhorses
    replied
    Originally posted by Forced_Firebird View Post
    Have you tried running a bead with the machine turned down on the thin metal to "thicken" it, then pull the thicker material into the previous weld bead?

    I run into this often when welding 1/8" and 3/32" floor plates on roll cages to 22-20ga floor pan material (often thinner due to prep and/or corrosion). I also find it helpful to "push" the wire/puddle into the weld, rather than "drag" it - heat the thick material and push the puddle into the thin, but be quick about it so the pool doesn't settle on the thin stuff for tool long. Also, it helps tremendously if you run small beads at a time (1" or less, then move to a new spot) to keep the surrounding area of the thin metal from heating up.

    Are you sectioning the frame for lowering/suspension purposes? Is this going to be weight bearing, or cosmetic repair?
    Thank you, exactly what I'm looking for.

    I've had this vehicle for a while and noticed some small holes in the frame in once section of the frame.

    What happened is mud has gotten into it and over is 26 years, this is the low spot on the frame and settled here. Right now, this is for cosmetic. I could have welded a piece to the top and bottom of the frame but I wanted to cut it out and see if I could get the sections welded back in and ground to where you couldn't tell anything was done. (More practice than anything else.)

    I'll try pushing, as I was trying to pull. Last night I was kind of pulling the trigger for a second and bouncing to different places like you suggest. It was kind of working here and there.

    But my skillset right now, I'm going to have to do a lot of grinding.

    I'm definitely not modifying the frame nor does anything mount to it here. I'd probably replace the frame rail if that were the case.



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  • Olivero
    replied
    What I do at times of filling gaps, which happens a lot because I Am really bad at cutting angle grinders or notching pipe is to run a bead and stop, let it cool, wire wheel it or whatever and run another to kind of fatten it up a bit or depending on the direction, fill the hole to a point of being able to make the 2 pieces connect, then you grind all the ugly stuff off and run a real bead now that you have a surface to join on.

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  • steelwarhorses
    replied
    I'm just looking for welding tips. The integrity as it is in the location, I'm welding, the truck is 6,000 lbs and I put the lift pad on it (2 post) and lifted the truck up under where I ended up cutting without any issue. (Jack stands all around in other structural places so I don't hear about that.

    I could have left it alone and most likely the frame would still outlast me. But I'm doing some other things, learning how to weld and giving this a go. If I felt there were real structural issues, after I fill the hole up, I'd put a piece on the outside and weld to where it bends at the top and bottom.

    I also have a friend with 20 years of stretching and shortening large truck frames I consult with and actually ran this by, he gave me the flux and told me to try and run the bead on the thicker metal, I'm just not having luck on the top and hate calling him ever afternoon asking questions.

    Plus if it were completely ate up, I could just replace it with another frame rail. This is a farm vehicle I tinker around in.

    Anyway, I'm not looking for anybody to assume or worry about liability on the structural part.

    I do appreciate the concern but for now I'm just looking to figure out how to weld two pieces when one is thinner than the other and they are vertical.

    _____________________________ Upper piece - This is thinner
    --------------------------------------------------- lower piece - This is thicker

    Dobermann, I don't have oxy/acetylene

    The "Leaking" down is to get the gap filled and I'm going to be going back try to run some overlap beads on that. Again if nothing else, this is just to fill the hole I created and I can use another piece on the outside to connect the top and bottom welds of the frame rail. There is still great thickness there in this area.


    Tonight if nothing else, I'm going to try and figure out the heat and wire speed to start running beads on the top piece and overlap till I get to the thicker piece and do a lot of grinding.

    Thanks for the input.

    Leave a comment:


  • Forced_Firebird
    replied
    Have you tried running a bead with the machine turned down on the thin metal to "thicken" it, then pull the thicker material into the previous weld bead?

    I run into this often when welding 1/8" and 3/32" floor plates on roll cages to 22-20ga floor pan material (often thinner due to prep and/or corrosion). I also find it helpful to "push" the wire/puddle into the weld, rather than "drag" it - heat the thick material and push the puddle into the thin, but be quick about it so the pool doesn't settle on the thin stuff for tool long. Also, it helps tremendously if you run small beads at a time (1" or less, then move to a new spot) to keep the surrounding area of the thin metal from heating up.

    Are you sectioning the frame for lowering/suspension purposes? Is this going to be weight bearing, or cosmetic repair?

    Leave a comment:


  • Dobermann
    replied
    I'd suggest that if you can't get back to material thick enough to hold a weld bead, you may be in more corrosion trouble than you thought. Typical frame section, even for unibody, is going to be on the order of 14 gauge as a minimum and if you can't get a bead on that without blowing through than you may be on a hopeless job.

    If you have any oxy/acetylene experience you might have better luck with that. But you really need to question the overall integrity of the structure if you're having this much trouble welding it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Sounds like you didnt trim back to full thickness metal--and welding a rectangular piece into a frame is most likely not a structurally sound way to do the repair. Each of the four corners will likely be a stress riser point and potentially generate new cracks if the frame flexes. The weld "leaking down" onto the thin metal Is pretty shaky from a structural viewpoint, to put it mildly.

    Your solid .035 wire is not going to be any help; won't work in rusty metal---flux core is the correct material.

    Please get someone with welding experience, in frame repair if possible, to look at this. Understand you came here for help, and I dont mean to be a downer, but depending on where in the frame you are welding, it is possible you are setting yourself up for future problems and perhaps danger. Rusted out vehicle frames are not a good place to learn to weld. Do yourself a favor and get a qualified person to look at this.

    Leave a comment:


  • steelwarhorses
    started a topic Welding a section into a truck frame

    Welding a section into a truck frame

    The truck frame had some rust holes in it so I cut sections out on both sides, I cut out a piece to fit in the rectangle I cut out. I'm new to welding and I'm doing this with my Millermatic 250x. First the frame rail is thin as it is. The material I'm welding it in is approx .1875 The problem is the top of the weld. The bottom, I run the bead on the thicker metal I'm welding in and the puddle leaks down into the thin metal and is doing pretty good. It's the top, I'm struggling with. I've tried running the bead along the top but I can't get it to the existing thin metal. I can't weave or it would just burn through the existing frame metal. I've then resorted to turning the machine down to where it won't burn through the thin frame metal and trying to at least get some metal bridge between the two. Best case I'm going to have a ton of grinding to do, worse case it's still burning through the thin metal making the gap between the new metal and old a little wider.

    I'm using Esab dual shield flux core .035. I have some regular .035 wire. I'm hoping there is a better way. if so I'm open to ideas. Again I'm a novice with more reading and watching than actual torch time.

    Thanks
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