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Which was do you choose to cut metal?

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  • Forced_Firebird
    replied
    I did take that out of context.

    I had a customer come by and cut a small piece of body panel out of a wrecked car we were salvaging parts from. He had one of those - just realized now it wasn't a typical tile/stone diamond blade. It seemed to go slower than an abrasive, but stunk just as bad (he was several feet away while I was working on something else). You know that "metal" taste from the dust, well it was the same from the diamond. Seems like staying the same size would be a nice feature, though.

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  • MAC702
    replied
    Originally posted by Forced_Firebird View Post

    Read the first post under the video. Same as all the other reviews I have read about the "metal blades for your wood saw" claims...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blQAe51F6oM

    Nothing like a cold saw with a carbide blade. They are designed to cut metal all around. Blade, saw, rotational speed etc.

    Just think about something if carbide in metal scares you....what's the best end mill you can put in your Bridgeport? Carbide of course, it's all about speed and feed
    You took me out of context. I was specifically addressing what appeared to me to be a mention of a carbide-toothed blade in an angle grinder; no other fears were intimated. I cut steel with both carbide-toothed and abrasive saws every day, in their respectively correct machines.
    Last edited by MAC702; 12-22-2016, 12:36 PM.

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  • Forced_Firebird
    replied
    Originally posted by MAC702 View Post

    Carbide, or diamond? http://www.lenoxtools.com/Pages/leno...irFRoC4mPw_wcB

    I was trying to picture a carbide blade because just the thought of it scared the **** out of me. The diamond looks intriguing. I might give that a try next time I need to buy blades. I've still got dozens ready to burn up though.

    And yeah, don't just change blades into a saw that wasn't designed for them. RPM's are a big part of the design.
    Read the first post under the video. Same as all the other reviews I have read about the "metal blades for your wood saw" claims...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blQAe51F6oM

    Nothing like a cold saw with a carbide blade. They are designed to cut metal all around. Blade, saw, rotational speed etc.

    Just think about something if carbide in metal scares you....what's the best end mill you can put in your Bridgeport? Carbide of course, it's all about speed and feed

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  • Olivero
    replied
    Originally posted by MAC702 View Post

    Carbide, or diamond? http://www.lenoxtools.com/Pages/leno...irFRoC4mPw_wcB

    I was trying to picture a carbide blade because just the thought of it scared the **** out of me. The diamond looks intriguing. I might give that a try next time I need to buy blades. I've still got dozens ready to burn up though.

    And yeah, don't just change blades into a saw that wasn't designed for them. RPM's are a big part of the design.
    I think they are diamond edged carbide blades or maybe just regular diamond edged steel.

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  • tarry99
    replied
    I have an Evolution Rage2 14" cold saw with the carbide blade.........actually bought some 15" blades for it for a little extra cutting range.........had it now for over a year.........probably 200 cuts in various materials still on the original blade.........very accurate , and will do compound cuts on tubing if you have a way to elevate one side...........blade life is all about feed pressure, take your time it will cut..............Noisy and the chips are like little knives so if you don't want them stuck to your shoes , you need to sweep up often. I like it!

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  • OscarJr
    replied
    Originally posted by MAC702 View Post

    Carbide, or diamond? http://www.lenoxtools.com/Pages/leno...irFRoC4mPw_wcB

    I was trying to picture a carbide blade because just the thought of it scared the **** out of me. The diamond looks intriguing. I might give that a try next time I need to buy blades. I've still got dozens ready to burn up though.

    And yeah, don't just change blades into a saw that wasn't designed for them. RPM's are a big part of the design.
    I just recently read that the Lenox Diamond blades are no bueno. Sure they will cut, but they produce dust like like an abrasive blade. Of course the dust isn't the aluminum oxide the blade is made of, just steel dust, but still. If you look at the picture in that link, you can even see the burr-o-rama going on in that cut. Diamonds are still abrasive, they just don't wear out like aluminum-oxide/ceramic abrasive, so that's why you still get burrs galore.

    Originally posted by Forced_Firebird View Post

    Time for a race! :P
    Oh I'm sure the Evo will cut way faster. But I betcha I can make the abrasive give it a good run, even if I do burn the motor up!
    Last edited by OscarJr; 12-21-2016, 08:25 PM.

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  • MAC702
    replied
    Originally posted by Olivero View Post
    I tried my angle grinder with a carbide blade, one of those Lenox ones...

    I thought about getting one of their 14" blades for my chop saw though....
    Carbide, or diamond? http://www.lenoxtools.com/Pages/leno...irFRoC4mPw_wcB

    I was trying to picture a carbide blade because just the thought of it scared the **** out of me. The diamond looks intriguing. I might give that a try next time I need to buy blades. I've still got dozens ready to burn up though.

    And yeah, don't just change blades into a saw that wasn't designed for them. RPM's are a big part of the design.

    Leave a comment:


  • Forced_Firebird
    replied
    Originally posted by OscarJr View Post
    ...and as of THIS minute, I now have both.
    Time for a race! :P

    The deal was so awesome on Cyber Monday, I couldn't pass it up. $150 free shipping, it's "almost" like buying a blade and getting a free saw lol.

    My abrasive has been parked for some time. Only time I was using it was to make true merge collectors and that JUST now gave me an idea on modifying the jig I made to work on the Evo!

    Also have my eye on the Rage 3. Almost got it in place of the Rage 2 since the 3 was only $50 more, but couldn't justify buying both at the same time and I do a lot of 3"+ tubing, so went with the larger capacity.

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  • OscarJr
    replied
    ...and as of THIS minute, I now have both.

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  • Olivero
    replied
    Well thanks for the input...... I guess I won't do that.

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  • Forced_Firebird
    replied
    I would never try a carbide blade for metal in a wood saw. The motor is just too fast. Some models of DeWalt wood saws have a belt and pulley, changing pulley sizes, perhaps, but don't think it's a good idea just to mount a carbide blade in there.

    I turned a Jet 14" vertical band saw into a metal cutting saw using the pulley method. About the only thing I can't cut is 316, the blade is just too fast, even with my slowest pulley. I have been thinking about adding a third pulley to have more options, but with the new cold saw, that thought has been fading. The band saw is generally used to cut flat stock into various shapes for roll cage pads - works excellent for that.

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  • Olivero
    replied
    I tried my angle grinder with a carbide blade, one of those Lenox ones, Igot one for free as a sample and cutting anything but pipe with it was just not working out, the blade kept slapping the steel as the blade had grooves in it, absolutely horrible. Cutting mesh and light wall tubing was fine but otherwise it sucked. Used abrasive blades again after that.

    I thought about getting one of their 14" blades for my chop saw though, I have a wood dewalt one which I think might just survive a carbide blade as there won't be much dust to eat the motor.

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  • OscarJr
    replied
    I've used both, but as of this minute I only own a chop saw. Yes with a brand new carbide blade, it's a night and day difference.

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  • Forced_Firebird
    replied
    Do you have both Oscar? It's a night and day difference. I wish I would have bought one long ago, personally.

    Here's a guy doing the same with a blade that looks more full. And while, yes, the blade may have had some wear, but you know as well as I, the only time the blade on an abrasive is full diameter, is on the first cut - the carbide will stay full size until dull.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYATVjKjipk

    EDIT: They say the blades last a 10:1 ratio or so. So the point on price of the blades is moot.

    Perhaps it's not for everyone, but a huge factor to me is the burrs left, and the heat. I need to cut, fit, cut often on the same part. I can touch a cold saw cut bare handed immediately after it drops off.
    Last edited by Forced_Firebird; 12-21-2016, 11:58 AM.

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  • OscarJr
    replied
    Let me try that pic again:





    Don't get me wrong, cold cut saws are awesome, and abrasive saws do have their limitations. A good comparison should be a cold cut saw with 500+ cuts on the blade vs a used abrasive saw blade, such as the one in the video linked.
    Last edited by OscarJr; 12-21-2016, 11:32 AM.

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