Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Which was do you choose to cut metal?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by SLP82 View Post
    Those power hack saws are interesting... I have never seen one before. I just looked them up on ebay though and everyone is putting "vintage" before the name so I think you know what that means... I didn't see a single one under $500... some that looked beat to crap but were old were going for $3,000!!! Seems like the blade would wear out fast compared to a band saw. So I have three related questions now:

    1. Do you guys wear a dust mask when using a chop saw?

    2. Seems the two best chops saws are a toss up between Makita and Dewalt, which would you recommend?

    3. Is there a specific abrasive wheel that lasts longer than other or will one of these "general purpose" $9 dewalt blades work fine?
    !. Yes, I always wear a 3M 7502 (or something like that, the one with the downward exhaust vent), with the gray 2297 filters, along with safety goggles and earplugs, or earmuffs, or sometimes earplugs AND earmuffs.

    2. I use a cheap $100 Northern Tool chop saw, and hasn't failed me yet. When it does, I'll just buy something just as cheap, since I don't run a business. **** I'm thinking of buying a back-up Porter Cable just in case this NT saw gives out. $79 w/ Prime shipping from Amazon, can't beat it, lol



    3. I pay around $6 for my abrasive wheels from Roark Supply.


    Get yourself one of these and drag your tools outside



    Then you won't have to worry about the black dust of death.
    Last edited by OscarJr; 12-18-2016, 05:24 PM.
    HTP Invertig221 D.V. Water-cooled
    HTP Pro Pulse 300 MIG
    HTP Pro Pulse 200 MIG x2
    HTP Pro Pulse 220 MTS
    HTP Inverarc 200 TLP water cooled
    HTP Microcut 875SC

    Comment


    • #17
      And yet another dadgum Texan....<br />
      <br />
      With the abrasive wheel chop saw, you can't force the cut. You'll end up getting a kaddywhompus cut end. But it really all depends on what you're trying to do. If you're looking for precision, then the hosizontal bandsaw is the was to go. But they ain't cheap and they take up space in a shop where square footage is not easily kept open. <br />
      <br />
      If you're cutting a bunch of small stuff, like fence railings or roll cage parts, a good 6" angle grinder and a cut off wheel will be your best friend. I'd cut more stuff on my saws if it wasn't so easy to just zip it off with the metabo. <br />
      <br />
      Don't let the good stand in the way of the great. Use what ya got, save up and get a nice saw if it turns out it's what you need. Don't be afraid to invest in yourself, get good quality gear.

      Comment


      • #18
        I've never seen an AC cage in my life that needed what I would call a precision cut. I'm not only a part time welder, but a fulltime electrician/HVAC guy, too. Anything welded together needs way less precision than a chop saw can easily do.

        However, since you clarified that you have cut-off wheels for hard materials, you don't need the chop saw to be as high a priority. It all depends on how often you cut those types of materials and how handy of a saw you want to use when you do. My chop saw is outside and I don't worry about its dust. And single hearing protection is sufficient to protect my already half-deafness. I'd HATE to go back to using that loud sucker indoors, though, but more especially for the sparks and particle discharge.

        Bandsaws are great, but I find the chop saw much faster for the types of cuts I need to set up and do. It's also a lot easier to throw in the back of the truck (although I have two chop saws and one can stay in truck as long as I want.)

        Comment


        • #19
          I have the Milwaukee chop saw with a composite blade. It has about the biggest motor I could find. Trouble is, it will trip a 20amp breaker, and that just slows me down and makes me mad.

          Comment


          • #20
            I have been fabricating at first on the side, then as a profession for over a decade. I have an abrasive chop saw, I have a vertical wood cutting band saw I modified with a pulley system so it now cuts metal, I have countless angle grinders and I have one thing to say about a recent purchase. "Why did I wait so long to buy this!?!?!?!?"

            It is a cold saw.

            After many hours (here and there) reading about various brands etc, I bought a cold saw this last "Cyber Monday". My mind was first set on the DeWalt dw872 since i have had good luck with their products (except the 4" angle grinder aka JUNK), but then I spotted the Evolution Rage2 for about half the cost. It had all the same complaints as the DeWalt, and it was on sale at homedepot.com for $150 FREE SHIPPING. So after tax, it was the best $157 I have ever spent on a tool. It chops 1x3x3/16 c-channel steel as fast as my dw716 (wood saw) does through an oak 2x4. I doubt I will ever use the abrasive saw ever again.
            J.Caraher
            Wide Open Throttle Technologies (WOT-Tech), Pompano Beach FL
            Miller Sync 300,Hobart 190
            RogueFab pneumatic, Hossfeld Manual
            Kitamura CNC, Bridgeport 2j
            TunerPRO, HPTuners, AEM, Megasquirt, DynoJet
            NASA Racing Official/Driver

            YouTube Link, Instagram Link, FaceBook Link

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Forced_Firebird View Post
              I have been fabricating at first on the side, then as a profession for over a decade. I have an abrasive chop saw, I have a vertical wood cutting band saw I modified with a pulley system so it now cuts metal, I have countless angle grinders and I have one thing to say about a recent purchase. "Why did I wait so long to buy this!?!?!?!?"

              It is a cold saw.

              After many hours (here and there) reading about various brands etc, I bought a cold saw this last "Cyber Monday". My mind was first set on the DeWalt dw872 since i have had good luck with their products (except the 4" angle grinder aka JUNK), but then I spotted the Evolution Rage2 for about half the cost. It had all the same complaints as the DeWalt, and it was on sale at homedepot.com for $150 FREE SHIPPING. So after tax, it was the best $157 I have ever spent on a tool. It chops 1x3x3/16 c-channel steel as fast as my dw716 (wood saw) does through an oak 2x4. I doubt I will ever use the abrasive saw ever again.
              I just bought one of those Evolution Rage2 saws for my Christmas gift to myself. Should be here Wednesday.


              Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
              You'll end up getting a kaddywhompus cut end
              Texan translation please? lol
              Last edited by OscarJr; 12-19-2016, 06:32 PM.
              HTP Invertig221 D.V. Water-cooled
              HTP Pro Pulse 300 MIG
              HTP Pro Pulse 200 MIG x2
              HTP Pro Pulse 220 MTS
              HTP Inverarc 200 TLP water cooled
              HTP Microcut 875SC

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by OscarJr View Post
                Texan translation please? lol
                Translating for Texans isn't really possible, but this should help anyone else: https://www.merriam-webster.com/word...ds/cattywampus

                Comment


                • #23
                  Complete different word, similar spelling...kaddywhompus, to the lay person, is like takin a double hitched giddy-up and falling on your face and tweaking your back. Then you get up and walk all crooked because your back is killin you. A guy would say, "hey, why you walking all kaddywhompus?"

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                    Complete different word,...
                    Crooked is completely different from diagonal, etymologically? My bad.
                    Last edited by MAC702; 12-19-2016, 09:20 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Oh ya. Cutting something on a diagonal would be on purpose, cutting something crooked makes you say bad words.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Good one!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Forced_Firebird View Post
                          I have been fabricating at first on the side, then as a profession for over a decade. I have an abrasive chop saw, I have a vertical wood cutting band saw I modified with a pulley system so it now cuts metal, I have countless angle grinders and I have one thing to say about a recent purchase. "Why did I wait so long to buy this!?!?!?!?"

                          It is a cold saw.

                          After many hours (here and there) reading about various brands etc, I bought a cold saw this last "Cyber Monday". My mind was first set on the DeWalt dw872 since i have had good luck with their products (except the 4" angle grinder aka JUNK), but then I spotted the Evolution Rage2 for about half the cost. It had all the same complaints as the DeWalt, and it was on sale at homedepot.com for $150 FREE SHIPPING. So after tax, it was the best $157 I have ever spent on a tool. It chops 1x3x3/16 c-channel steel as fast as my dw716 (wood saw) does through an oak 2x4. I doubt I will ever use the abrasive saw ever again.
                          That was the very 1st option I looked at, but I read many disturbing reviews about them, including dozens of people mentioning ruined or dull blades after 20 to 60 cuts. Most in fairness were closer to 60, but still... i got over 60 cuts out of one 14" abrasive dewalt general purpose wheel that costs $9. If a $80 carbide blade wore out after even 100 cuts, I would be beyond pissed! Also I heard the clamping system was a joke on those rage2 and rage3. From what I gathered, you have to ensure whatever you are cutting is extremely secured in order for the blade to last. Have you had to replace a blade yet? If so after how long and what were you cutting? I will be cutting a lot of 1/4" angle iron, some 1/8" square tubing, some 1/4" square tubing, and 1/4" thick 3" pipe.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I will say that I ruined a blade rather quickly on my DeWalt MultiCutter. The next one lasted a lot longer, but still not as long as it should have. Both times were my fault. I hadn't yet got it through my thick skull that it just can't do what a chop saw can do. By its third blade, I was using it correctly, EVERY SINGLE TIME I USED IT.

                            You can set up the cut in a chop saw much more quickly than a carbide saw, and that will be a very bad habit. I was lucky when I broke my first blade.

                            Don't take me out of context. The carbide saw is GREAT, and the better tool for a lot of stuff. But I can live without it. I can't live without an abrasive chop saw. Eventually, get both.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              I haven't replaced the ferrous "multi-purpose" blade that came with it yet. I have about 20 cuts on it and it still feels sharp. MAC702 is right, and I know that from long time tool handling with expensive wood saw blades and cutting hardwoods. Let the blade do the work, don't force it.

                              As far as the comparison to an abrasive blade, I will say this:

                              Pretend you have to make 120 cuts to do a welding job. "IF" you burn through two $80 blades, that's $160. Divide that into the cuts and you will have $160/120=$1.33 per cut. Cuts take ~.5min ea, so you complete all the cuts in an hour.

                              Using an abrasive,each cut is going to take you about 2.5min. 2.5 X 120 = 300min (5hours).

                              So, as a welder, let's you are charging ~$65/hr to weld. Take that 4hr X $65 = $260

                              Now take that $260 you "could" have been making, but instead you were cutting with an abrasive. Subtract the cost of the two blades you used ($160), and you are still $100 ahead of the game. AND you have 4 hours of time that you can NEVER get back. You can always do another job and make more money, but you can never get your time back. And......I didn't even mention the burrs that the abrasive will leave. The cold saw is nearly ready to weld, the abrasive leaves horrible burrs.

                              Of course this is all hypothetical, but I find being in business, it is all about using time wisely, and efficiency is key. It may not matter much when you are building your car for the Grassroots Motorsports $20xx Challenge (I was on a team for a few years) where you have to budget every consumable, but when you are like the rest of us and trying to stuff 12hr of work into an 8hr day, it will make a big difference in the end.
                              Last edited by Forced_Firebird; 12-20-2016, 10:54 AM.
                              J.Caraher
                              Wide Open Throttle Technologies (WOT-Tech), Pompano Beach FL
                              Miller Sync 300,Hobart 190
                              RogueFab pneumatic, Hossfeld Manual
                              Kitamura CNC, Bridgeport 2j
                              TunerPRO, HPTuners, AEM, Megasquirt, DynoJet
                              NASA Racing Official/Driver

                              YouTube Link, Instagram Link, FaceBook Link

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Forced_Firebird View Post
                                I haven't replaced the ferrous "multi-purpose" blade that came with it yet. I have about 20 cuts on it and it still feels sharp. MAC702 is right, and I know that from long time tool handling with expensive wood saw blades and cutting hardwoods. Let the blade do the work, don't force it.

                                As far as the comparison to an abrasive blade, I will say this:

                                Pretend you have to make 120 cuts to do a welding job. "IF" you burn through two $80 blades, that's $160. Divide that into the cuts and you will have $160/120=$1.33 per cut. Cuts take ~.5min ea, so you complete all the cuts in an hour.

                                Using an abrasive,each cut is going to take you about 2.5min. 2.5 X 120 = 300min (5hours).

                                So, as a welder, let's you are charging ~$65/hr to weld. Take that 4hr X $65 = $260

                                Now take that $260 you "could" have been making, but instead you were cutting with an abrasive. Subtract the cost of the two blades you used ($160), and you are still $100 ahead of the game. AND you have 4 hours of time that you can NEVER get back. You can always do another job and make more money, but you can never get your time back. And......I didn't even mention the burrs that the abrasive will leave. The cold saw is nearly ready to weld, the abrasive leaves horrible burrs.

                                Of course this is all hypothetical, but I find being in business, it is all about using time wisely, and efficiency is key. It may not matter much when you are building your car for the Grassroots Motorsports $20xx Challenge (I was on a team for a few years) where you have to budget every consumable, but when you are like the rest of us and trying to stuff 12hr of work into an 8hr day, it will make a big difference in the end.
                                I definitely understand the concept of what you are saying, but to cut most of the stuff, even 1/4" angle iron, it doesn't take me 2.5 mins per cut. I would say it's under one minute but I've honestly never timed it. This is why I feel a horizontal band saw is the happy medium between chop saw and carbide. Most welders I've spoken to set the bandsaw up, turn it on, and walk away and go back to something else since it uses gravity (hydraulic on more expensive systems) to pull itself through the material and then auto turns itself off. Blades are cheap compared to carbide blades, and a gravity feed bandsaw such as klutch or wen is cheaper than a dewalt or makita carbide saw. The only down side I see is portability. Although they do make bench top horizontal band saws. But for now, I don't intend to do work on locations. Most everything will be in my garage. I'm really thinking I'll get the bandsaw for 95% of cuts, and a cheap chop saw for just rare 5%. I figure if it's a cheaper chop saw it isn't a huge deal if I'm only using it 5% of the time.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X