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cast elbow to carbon pipe

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  • Jayare123
    replied
    It won't see temps like that. It's a boiler pipe to steam jackets in a brewery

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  • Forced_Firebird
    replied
    Curious to see how this holds up.

    On a tight budget, I once turned a cast manifold flange into a turbo manifold flange (cut off from the stock used exhaust), and welded it to a mild steel mandrel bend to utilize a stock exhaust after the turbocharger. Took a lot of preheating/cleaning and used 304l filler rod, but it held up to those heat cycles (~50°f-~1200°f, Florida doesn't get much below 50°) for a year or so in a daily driven car - well, until the owner didn't check his oil level and brought the car back with a seized crank.

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  • Olivero
    replied
    I was gonna say 309. I use stainless for cast, since its a little more "flexible" for a lack of a real metallurgical term.

    Good on ya! Cast iron is never fun.

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  • Oldgrandad
    replied
    Awesome! Glad the repair went well.

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  • aametalmaster
    replied
    Originally posted by Jayare123 View Post
    But he is fully aware that I welded something that metallurgicly isn't really supposed to work. So if it fails it's getting cut out and weld fittings installed.
    Perfect...Bob

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  • Jayare123
    replied
    Yeah. First round had one tiny leak on cast side. Went back over it and it held. Honestly I think it won't hold through continued heat cycling. But he is fully aware that I welded something that metallurgicly isn't really supposed to work. So if it fails it's getting cut out and weld fittings installed.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Look for cracks at the toe of the weld on the cast iron side. That will be the prime suspect if it's going to fail.

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  • Jayare123
    replied
    Update. 309 successfully joined them. We'll see how it holds up after it heat cycles a few times

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  • Jayare123
    replied
    It's about 4 inch schedule 40. Threads have been very well cleaned from the fitting back. I have some silicon bronze and I also have some 309. Undecided on which to use as of now. Figuring I can't really go back and try the other on top after I choose one and try it. Could stop at lws and get nickel rods tho. Supposed to be going down there tomorrow am to see what I can do. So got till then to decide.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I suggested the braze process because you're not melting the base metal, which is the part that makes you cuss with cast iron repairs. <br />
    <br />
    How big is this pipe? I wouldn't think preheat would be necessary unless it's a large pipe, but preheat will help burn out the schmoo before you attempt to stab some filler metal in there.

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  • Oldgrandad
    replied
    15 psi Mac's right low pucker factor, I've done a bunch of repairs like this and have used both silicon bronze and ss rod (not on the same repair) 304 or 316 cause that's what was on my shelf. Always used TIG, be sure to burn into the root of the threads to avoid any leaks and clean the &amp;*%$ out of the threads BEFORE getting it hot. If there is a lot of dope on the threads expect it to bubble out when things get hot and do the bottom first so the goo bubbles up into your weld, not flows down into it. New unions are your best option but welding will stop the drip. Hope repair goes smooth for you.

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  • MAC702
    replied
    I've successfully welded mild to cast with standard filler, but it's not fun, and takes a long time, and you don't want to screw much with it afterward. The more I think about the OP, this may be more difficult than desired. If this union is already in place with goop in the threads, though, that changes things significantly. If it can be removed to get the threads clean from Teflon and grease, then I'm not sure why it isn't being replaced with a new union that doesn't leak.

    Since it's available, it seems, the nickel stick is the process I would use.

    Caveat: I've no experience with the silicon bronze or aluminum bronze, so these may be ideal, depending on prep conditions and availability.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Silicon bronze will work too. I just prefer aluminum bronze. I think it's stronger and flows better. The AC welding current cleaning action will help with either of those filler metals. <br />
    <br />
    Mac says you should be fine with any steel filler metal. That would be easiest, but I don't like to weld any cast iron, I prefer the braze process and have had success with it in the past. Sounds like Mac has done this before, so that experience is valuable.

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  • MAC702
    replied
    I don't think it matters. Use the process you want to use and then whatever you have for it. It'd probably last forever with whatever steel filler you already have handy. That said, yes, a stainless or nickel filler will be better, especially if under vibration. But this is a job with a low pucker factor.

    Which joint are you welding, the pipe threads? Are they contaminated?

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  • Jayare123
    replied
    What about silicon bronze?

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