Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New to Welding and Forum, Request Help with Airco (Miller) Welder

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New to Welding and Forum, Request Help with Airco (Miller) Welder

    Dear Forum Members,

    I'm new to this forum, and I've never welded before. I've always wanted to learn, since I do all my own auto mechanic work and other repairs.

    I just bought an older Airco welder, without leads, for $50.00 with a guarantee it'll work or my money back. I'm looking for the manual, and for advice on cable connectors.

    Here are the specs, both what's on the outside and the inside, along with a few photos:

    Outside:
    Airco Welder Model 1.8A/DDR224A
    Serial No.: T458814
    Stock No.: 1341-008
    180 Ampere AC/DC MSN
    BusyBee Rectifier Welder
    Inside:
    Miller Gold Star
    013 252
    037 665
    H-68 6

    I'd really like to have the manual for this. I've not found the manual at Miller Support. Though they list some GoldStar models, I suspect this one predates anything they've posted manuals for. Nor can I find it anywhere else. If someone here can point me to it I'd very much appreciate it.

    Because it came without leads, I'm opting to make my own from #2 25' jumper cables, so I need two connectors that plug leads into the welder. I couldn't find just the connectors at the Miller site; however I suspect I need two of the connectors listed at http://store.cyberweld.com/diicaco.h...FcMjgQodHlMKrw. Can someone here please confirm ... or correct me?

    I'll be adding a 50 amp 220v breaker and receptacle in my garage while I wait with fingers crossed for your help. And please feel free to throw in any advice you think will help a "retired" older fellow "green as a gourd" when it comes to stick welding.

    Thanks sincerely in advance.

    Alan

  • #2
    I doubt that welding machine has dinse connectors like the ones in your link from cyberweld. Just a quick google search, my guess its something more like this...

    https://www.arc-zone.com/tapered-mac...-lc-10mp-05081

    Google search "miller taper style connector". Don't take it to the bank, but that's most likely the connector on that old machine.

    Have you tried calling miller customer support to see if they can help you find the correct manual? I have a suspicion they will be a most helpful resource for you.

    Are you planning to make your jumper cables into welding leads?

    Comment


    • #3
      I was looking to the archive and ran across this info but as Ryan said calling support would always be best.

      MEMCO
      Miller Welders
      Model M-180, M-180P, M-225, M-225P
      Operating and Maintenance Manual
      Form no. MO-114-8J-C2

      Comment


      • #4
        Ryan and Medicr224,

        Thank you both very much for your very helpful responses!

        Ryan, I think you're correct re. the connectors. I downloaded the manual Medicr224 mentioned, and though it's not an exact match to my model, it's the closest I've seen (I suspect it's for a model with AC or DC only whereas mine has both); and it discusses what it calls "jack plugs" with a drawing I've attached.

        I'll contact Miller customer support this morning requesting both the manual and confirmation on the connectors.

        Ryan, yes I'm planning to make my jumper cables into leads, based on recommendations I found on other forums -- specifically, for 180 amps max, #2 wire jumper cables will do the job fine. If you have reservations, please let me know.

        I'll finish up installing the 220v in the garage, then I may plug it in without leads and turn it on to see if it hums, the fan runs, etc. before locating, purchasing and completing the leads with the connectors, the rod holder, etc. I'll post back when I know more ... hopefully later today.

        Again, thank you both sincerely for your help!

        Alan

        Comment


        • #5
          Welcome, Alan! You may have already found this, but if not, here's some help getting started with stick welding.
          https://www.millerwelds.com/-/media/...lines_smaw.pdf

          Comment


          • #6
            I've never made welding leads out of jumper cables, but now what are you gonna do for jumper cables? <br />
            <br />
            Why not just get some welding lead?

            Comment


            • #7
              Ryan, I contacted Miller support online, and in only an hour or so Adam there emailed me the correct manual. FYI, it's a Miller model "180P AC/DC". You were spot-on re. the connectors -- that's exactly what I need. I'm making 25' leads from #2 wire jumper cables to save money based on other forum conversations I've read. #2 welding cable around here costs $3.00 to $4.00 per foot, so 50' is $150.00 to $200.00. I bought the jumper cables for $50.00. The manual calls for #2 up to 50', I'm just getting started on a budget, and if it works I'll probably upgrade to better & longer cables.

              Aeronca, thanks very, very much for that link -- that document will surely help me get started correctly.

              All, I finished installing a 50 amp breaker and receptacle, finished cleaning out the inside of the welder (no mice-chewed wires, nests, etc.), plugged it in, turned it on, and it hums and the fan runs well. Of course I won't know for sure until I get the connectors I've ordered and assembled my cables, but it's looking promising!

              As a 66-year-old old dog learning new tricks, I'm delighted to have found this forum and already "met" you friendly and helpful folks. I'm sure I'll get stumped again before long and be asking for help; but in the mean time, I'll be reading other conversations here hoping to learn. (At my stage of the learning process, that surely won't take much to find.) Thank you all so much .

              Alan

              Comment


              • #8
                Aeronca41, I hope it's OK to diverge from welding (mostly) for a moment. Your user name makes me suspect you're a pilot, and/or you have and/or love Aeronca aircraft ... perhaps a 1941 model. They certainly are beautiful and endearing aircraft. I've taken flying lessons twice in my life, both times passing the written and advancing through solo cross-country flights both times, totaling over 45 hours in Cessna 150s and 172s. Regrettably I didn't get to complete my license. (My wife and I kept having children.) Anyway, my second instructor took me up several times in his '40s (I believe) Aeronca for fun, to introduce me to aerobatics, and I'm sure to see if he could make me sick. He didn't succeed and I loved it every minute of it. If you're a welder of airplanes, you must be very gifted, versatile and certified.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Love those old Aeroncas. I have an O-58B in the garage -in pieces- my dad was restoring when he passed away from far too many years of 10-12 hrs/day welding, often stainless, back before anyone understood fumes and the need for respirators. Hoping to get it finished one day, but the first year of my retirement has passed me by without touching it; lots of other life issues. Hope springs eternal! Was half decent at aircraft welding about 40-50 years ago (working towards Experimentals-no A&P certification). My dad was an aircraft maint tech in the AAF in WWII, and he and a couple of his friends were magicians with an OA torch and taught me a lot. I haven't done any 4130 tubing welding for a very long time, but still love gas welding-it's absorbingly quiet and peaceful, just you and the puddle, which to me seems almost alive sometimes. There is something absolutely fascinating about molten metal.

                  I learned to fly in the O-58B, Champs, and Cessnas. Like the old tail draggers best. I still remember my amazement the first time I landed a C-150--seemed like there was just not much to do compared to the tail draggers. No flying now for years-just too expensive to fly enough to maintain currency.

                  Ok, thread officially hijacked, but old memories are always good!

                  Hope your machine works well when you get the cables made. You may find stick welding a bit of a challenge at first (someone has said they don't call it STICK welding for nothing) but you will get the hang of it with a little practice. Keep us posted on how you make out, and enjoy.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post
                    welding-it's absorbingly quiet and peaceful, just you and the puddle, which to me seems almost alive sometimes. There is something absolutely fascinating about molten metal.
                    That's how I feel about TIG in a quiet work space, I always try to tell the other guys the same thing but they don't notice, they are too busy trying to figure out what to do. You can just hear the gas flow and the small sounds metal makes as you weld it, love that stuff.

                    Alan,

                    Welcome to the welding world,

                    Any questions you have or help you need, ask away. Ryan, H80N, AAMetalmaster and Aeronca are some of the names you will see the most here, I only joined a year ago so they got time on me but they are all very helpfull and I hope we can get you started off good.

                    What type of welding hood did you get?

                    if there's a welder, there's a way

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post
                      Welcome, Alan! You may have already found this, but if not, here's some help getting started with stick welding.
                      https://www.millerwelds.com/-/media/...lines_smaw.pdf
                      This is just what I needed too! Thanks.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Milter View Post

                        This is just what I needed too! Thanks.
                        Great! You will find similar books on the other processes in that same area of the web site. Welcome aboard.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Olivero View Post

                          That's how I feel about TIG in a quiet work space, I always try to tell the other guys the same thing but they don't notice, they are too busy trying to figure out what to do. You can just hear the gas flow and the small sounds metal makes as you weld it, love that stuff.
                          I hear you. Still taking baby steps with TIG due to time and responsibilities; learning to tig well was (is) one of my goals in retirement - but need far more time to practice. Precious little so far, and I'm just a hacker at this point.

                          I feel it's very similar to OA from the concentration and "total absorption" viewpoint. With either process, I often feel like when I take off the goggles or lift the hood I'm stepping back into the real world from wherever it was I've been while working that puddle. You can just get lost in there, and I agree that a lot of folks don't get that, and some think such talk and thoughts are weird. To each his own, but that's why I like welding. No politicians, no talking heads, no hustle and bustle. It's all gone for a little while in the dark and quiet with the liquid metal.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Unless you're welding some aluminum, then you have to put ear plugs in if you want some dadgum peace and quite.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                              Unless you're welding some aluminum, then you have to put ear plugs in if you want some dadgum peace and quite.
                              Yep-thought about that later.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X