Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tungsten Electrode question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • OscarJr
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Why can't it be perfect? Dadgumit.
    Two words: Optrel. e684. Not only does it darken-on-the fly for you, as you're varying the amps/light intensity during a weld, it does so, not in discrete steps from one shade to another, but continuously & smoothly in-between. For TIG welding, I feel it is the ultimate helmet due to this feature and the fact that many times amperage has to be modulated, thus changing the light intensity throughout a weld.

    Leave a comment:


  • tommyapplegate30
    replied
    awesome

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post
    Ordered. Will see what we can learn.
    It is truly amazing what you can now find in engineering evaluation kits and ap notes these days...

    what a time to be alive.....

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Ordered. Will see what we can learn.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post
    https://www.sparkfun.com/products/12705

    Neat little gadget. While I'm not sure how you would calibrate it for absolute values, it looks like relative measurements would be pretty easy by just hooking a DVM to the output. For $13 bucks, I think I'll order one just out of curiosity. Won't take much to hook a couple of AA batteries and a couple of caps to it.
    WHAT..!!! No IEEE-488 port....??

    Cool find...
    Last edited by H80N; 11-23-2016, 12:24 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    https://www.sparkfun.com/products/12705

    Neat little gadget. While I'm not sure how you would calibrate it for absolute values, it looks like relative measurements would be pretty easy by just hooking a DVM to the output. For $13 bucks, I think I'll order one just out of curiosity. Won't take much to hook a couple of AA batteries and a couple of caps to it.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I just watched a YouTube video where a guy made one cheap as ****. Used an arduino board or something like that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Olivero
    replied
    Pff. I wish. Nothing fancy schmancy like that around here.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Anybody have access to a uv-sensitive photometer? Could answer this question in a minute.

    Leave a comment:


  • Olivero
    replied
    Right but it says "Minimum protection" when the hood is just "off" its still slightly shaded. To me, that would mean the protection can be increased. I might be wrong though, its possible. Would not be the first time

    Leave a comment:


  • Ltbadd
    replied
    Originally posted by Olivero View Post

    Yes but the shading still filters out more, the darker the less UV gets through. The hoods are made so in an idle state, your eyes don't get damaged but there are OSHA standards for it as well.
    This is from a Miller document
    Click image for larger version

Name:	Lens.jpg
Views:	165
Size:	48.5 KB
ID:	574907

    So it seems you (may) have a point, using a shade 12 will help, but if your welding with a too dark of shade for a given amperage then your (welding) performance could suffer.

    Still the text I posted doesn't really provide a complete answer, IMO.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    If I'm running a lot of beads, especially MIG, I wear sunglasses under my hood. It works for me. I feel like I can run a lighter shade but still get good protection while being able to see better. Almost like an "in between" shade. 12 is too dark yet 11 leaves me walking away with a big blue dot in my vision for a while, for example. Why can't it be perfect? Dadgumit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Olivero
    replied
    Okay, I was running out the door on that post.

    The shade of the lens is very much different and changes how much UV gets through. The higher the amps, the brighter the light, the whole "your eyes feel like they were dipped in sand and rubbed" phenomena comes from staring at too bright a light and the UV, the cornea (i belive) gets fried or damaged, so the higher your shade is, the less light comes through.

    IF you TIG weld stainless at say, 120 amps and do aluminum at the same amps, you will notice a difference in the ligt emission, not only do your arms burn red a million times faster in aluminum but you may need to shade up because its too bright. Its the same amperage so why is it different?

    The reflection plays a big part, welding darker steel like carbon coated stuff to stainless is not as reflective as aluminum is. With that said, your shade level does change how much light and radiation is let through as wether its light or UV, you will still get eye issues if your shade is too low. I have co-workers that worked with their shade too low for hours and went home, woke up with "sand" in their eyes so I keep my shade way up and keep my eyes sharp.

    Check this out. http://weldingdesign.com/equipment-a...d-know-you-buy

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Nice chart! Thanks for posting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Olivero
    replied
    Originally posted by Ltbadd View Post
    Correct me if I'm wrong but I do believe all modern hoods filter the UV even in an light state (for ADH) so using a 12 shade isn't reducing harmful UV, just making it harder to see

    You can rant if you want to...
    Yes but the shading still filters out more, the darker the less UV gets through. The hoods are made so in an idle state, your eyes don't get damaged but there are OSHA standards for it as well.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X