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Tungsten Electrode question

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  • #16
    Here is the MSDS for TIG Tungstens

    http://www.diamondground.com/DGP-SDS_2016.pdf

    .

    *******************************************
    The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

    “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

    Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

    My Blue Stuff:
    Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
    Dynasty 200DX
    Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
    Millermatic 200

    TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

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    • #17
      ...you're ranting....by all means, continue....

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      • #18
        Ha, Im done now
        if there's a welder, there's a way

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Olivero View Post

          I wear sleeves and a respirator most of the time and keep my hood shade at 12 for as much as possible unless I go totally blind. It may not affect you a whole lot but to some, it may affect them a lot, really depends on the person.


          I feel like I am ranting, am I ranting?
          Correct me if I'm wrong but I do believe all modern hoods filter the UV even in an light state (for ADH) so using a 12 shade isn't reducing harmful UV, just making it harder to see

          You can rant if you want to...

          Richard
          West coast of Florida

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          • #20
            The DGP Tungsten Guidebook is worth downloading & keeping for reference

            http://www.diamondground.com/TungstenGuidebook2013.pdf

            .

            *******************************************
            The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

            “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

            Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

            My Blue Stuff:
            Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
            Dynasty 200DX
            Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
            Millermatic 200

            TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Ltbadd View Post
              Correct me if I'm wrong but I do believe all modern hoods filter the UV even in an light state (for ADH) so using a 12 shade isn't reducing harmful UV, just making it harder to see

              You can rant if you want to...
              Yes but the shading still filters out more, the darker the less UV gets through. The hoods are made so in an idle state, your eyes don't get damaged but there are OSHA standards for it as well.
              if there's a welder, there's a way

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              • #22
                Nice chart! Thanks for posting.

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                • #23
                  Okay, I was running out the door on that post.

                  The shade of the lens is very much different and changes how much UV gets through. The higher the amps, the brighter the light, the whole "your eyes feel like they were dipped in sand and rubbed" phenomena comes from staring at too bright a light and the UV, the cornea (i belive) gets fried or damaged, so the higher your shade is, the less light comes through.

                  IF you TIG weld stainless at say, 120 amps and do aluminum at the same amps, you will notice a difference in the ligt emission, not only do your arms burn red a million times faster in aluminum but you may need to shade up because its too bright. Its the same amperage so why is it different?

                  The reflection plays a big part, welding darker steel like carbon coated stuff to stainless is not as reflective as aluminum is. With that said, your shade level does change how much light and radiation is let through as wether its light or UV, you will still get eye issues if your shade is too low. I have co-workers that worked with their shade too low for hours and went home, woke up with "sand" in their eyes so I keep my shade way up and keep my eyes sharp.

                  Check this out. http://weldingdesign.com/equipment-a...d-know-you-buy
                  if there's a welder, there's a way

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                  • #24
                    If I'm running a lot of beads, especially MIG, I wear sunglasses under my hood. It works for me. I feel like I can run a lighter shade but still get good protection while being able to see better. Almost like an "in between" shade. 12 is too dark yet 11 leaves me walking away with a big blue dot in my vision for a while, for example. Why can't it be perfect? Dadgumit.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Olivero View Post

                      Yes but the shading still filters out more, the darker the less UV gets through. The hoods are made so in an idle state, your eyes don't get damaged but there are OSHA standards for it as well.
                      This is from a Miller document
                      Click image for larger version

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                      So it seems you (may) have a point, using a shade 12 will help, but if your welding with a too dark of shade for a given amperage then your (welding) performance could suffer.

                      Still the text I posted doesn't really provide a complete answer, IMO.
                      Richard
                      West coast of Florida

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                      • #26
                        Right but it says "Minimum protection" when the hood is just "off" its still slightly shaded. To me, that would mean the protection can be increased. I might be wrong though, its possible. Would not be the first time
                        if there's a welder, there's a way

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                        • #27
                          Anybody have access to a uv-sensitive photometer? Could answer this question in a minute.

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                          • #28
                            Pff. I wish. Nothing fancy schmancy like that around here.
                            if there's a welder, there's a way

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                            • #29
                              I just watched a YouTube video where a guy made one cheap as ****. Used an arduino board or something like that.

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                              • #30
                                https://www.sparkfun.com/products/12705

                                Neat little gadget. While I'm not sure how you would calibrate it for absolute values, it looks like relative measurements would be pretty easy by just hooking a DVM to the output. For $13 bucks, I think I'll order one just out of curiosity. Won't take much to hook a couple of AA batteries and a couple of caps to it.

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