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  • Olivero
    replied
    Originally posted by H80N View Post

    So does 2% Lanthanated (BLUE)...................

    As far as I can see.... the E3/Tri-Mix tungstens are more a marketing gimmick than anything else

    IF....I could see any advantage... I would gladly spend the premium for he E33...

    BUT I DON'T..... so why spend extra to no avail....??

    Maybe the E3 work better in Transformer machines... But ...in my experience...they are sure not the hot tip in inverters like the Dynasty

    Tungsten Electrodes Review

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzEuV83UGMY

    Tungsten Electrodes - 2% lanthanated vs the rest...pure,ceriated,thoriated, and zirconiated

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpanERwagaU


    HAHA! I knew it

    I haven't tried yours.... Still, I fail to give it a chance but one day I will and I will happily let you know how it goes

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by Olivero View Post
    .......
    Next time you buy electrodes, buy the E3's purple band (H80N is going to argue with me on this ), they work for both AC and DC on any metal so if you wanna flip in and out of AC/DC from Alum/Steels then those will go both ways without you needing to keep 2 different types on the shelf.
    So does 2% Lanthanated (BLUE)...................

    As far as I can see.... the E3/Tri-Mix tungstens are more a marketing gimmick than anything else

    IF....I could see any advantage... I would gladly spend the premium for he E33...

    BUT I DON'T..... so why spend extra to no avail....??

    Maybe the E3 work better in Transformer machines... But ...in my experience...they are sure not the hot tip in inverters like the Dynasty

    Tungsten Electrodes Review

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzEuV83UGMY

    Tungsten Electrodes - 2% lanthanated vs the rest...pure,ceriated,thoriated, and zirconiated

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpanERwagaU


    Leave a comment:


  • Olivero
    replied
    Weell, Not bad at all. The way I tought my guys was they weld it together, I try to break it

    Always fun.

    Anyways, seems like you got it together pretty good, steel is definetley getting overcooked, need to move faster like Ryan and H80N mentioned and just keep practicing. Aluminum gets you into the habbit of moving really fast so might be worth it to try that as well.

    The reason aluminum helps you move faster is because, when you don't, it droops and either blows through OR in my first case, drops onto your leg as a charring hot piece of white destruction and that hurts, after that. Keep my leg away from the metal and I move fast.

    Other than that, weave it, right left right left, nice Z shapes almost or C shapes to fuse both sides. But really, just a matter of practice. If you are inside, I would set my argon to 15, not 20. You really don't need 20 and its just gonna cost you in the long run.

    Next time you buy electrodes, buy the E3's purple band (H80N is going to argue with me on this ), they work for both AC and DC on any metal so if you wanna flip in and out of AC/DC from Alum/Steels then those will go both ways without you needing to keep 2 different types on the shelf.

    Leave a comment:


  • lpmartin
    replied
    I am amazed at how many Lance Martins are out there. I'm not knowingly related to any other Lances. I grew up in St. Louis near the airport. Thanks for the guidance and inspiration.

    Lance

    Leave a comment:


  • tarry99
    replied
    Originally posted by lpmartin View Post
    I am reading and watching all you sent. I need to run-run-run left to right to perfect the timing and separate my hand movements. I also can't yet comprehend how setup impacts the weld. So I switched to 1/8" electrode with 1/2" cup and produced this. I tried to keep it moving without overcooking. Now I'll practice as you have advised. Not sure if any are curious so I posted anyway. Thanks for the instruction! I'll let you know when I'm perfect. :-)
    Use 3/32" tungsten , 1/8" is too big about 125 -140 amps, 15-18 CFM and grind your metal clean.......get into the habit of keeping your metal clean , including wiping down the weld zone with acetone and..........practice, practice, practice............takes years to become good on all metals.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    OFF TOPIC.....................

    I went to HS.... with a Lance Martin in Deerfield, IL many years ago (1966-70)

    any connection...????.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Lance

    If you would like some inspiration and see some really fine Dynasty TIG welding.... take a look at John Marcella's work

    he has elevated it to an art form..

    This is a skill level to aspire to............
    TIG Welding Aesthetics with the Dynasty 350

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Db6BVMANvW0

    Marcella Manifolds & TIG Welding Aluminum Manifolds

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGPgsXwgQkQ


    Chris Razor does some fine work too
    Chris Razor Discusses Advanced AC TIG Welding Controls on Aluminum

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohuoWdZ7fW0


    AND not to forget our own "FUSIONKING" (Garry)
    Dynasty 280 and Weldcraft Torch Provide Versatility for Aluminum Boat Repairs

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CDNi8ZhHdrk



    FB Page

    https://www.facebook.com/OutBackAlum...=page_internal

    Last edited by H80N; 11-05-2016, 03:21 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • lpmartin
    replied
    I am reading and watching all you sent. I need to run-run-run left to right to perfect the timing and separate my hand movements. I also can't yet comprehend how setup impacts the weld. So I switched to 1/8" electrode with 1/2" cup and produced this. I tried to keep it moving without overcooking. Now I'll practice as you have advised. Not sure if any are curious so I posted anyway. Thanks for the instruction! I'll let you know when I'm perfect. :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    I love practicing on aluminum, after that, steel is easy.
    And the music is fun too........

    Maybe some.. Cream..??. Buffalo Springfield...??... Deep Purple....???????

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I love practicing on aluminum, after that, steel is easy.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Says Aluminum but most techniques illustrated are useful for all TIG.... you just have to move much faster for Aluminum

    TIG Welding Aluminum Basics.... 1... 2....3... & .. 4


    Andy Weyenberg, motorsports marketing manager, Miller Electric Mfg. Co. ( http://www.millerwelds.com ), discusses aluminum TIG welding basics. The first step to working with aluminum: master positioning of the torch and hand.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FadO0hqTaN0

    The second step to working with aluminum: coordinating hand movement and filler deposition.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ay_oYg0LUo

    The third step to working with aluminum: learning how to form and control the puddle.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oTZfDndPkl0

    The fourth step to working with aluminum: introducing filler metal to the puddle:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FpxzVq6YsoM

    Last edited by H80N; 11-04-2016, 05:46 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    What you need to do is pad some beads. Just run bead after bead, both ways, switching torch hands, overlapping each bead by about half. You'll figure it out. You'll get all the help you need here too. Just don't have too thin of skin. <br />
    <br />h.
    I Agree

    You will develop your rhythm with practice.... use music as a metronome to help get the beat of it.....

    Crank up some Clapton..... Dire Straits....Cars..... Or..???. (Your Preference)....

    AND..... Practice...practice...practice.....

    Kinda like dancing.... dip...move...dip...move...dip..................... .and so on....


    ALSO.... worth your while to revisit the stuff listed below

    Originally posted by H80N View Post
    Basic Guidelines

    https://www.millerwelds.com/~/media/...s/gtawbook.pdf

    Lots of good resources here too

    https://www.millerwelds.com/resource...ding-resources

    AND advice from Jody

    TIG Welding Tips - 3 Tips that Matter Most
    (First 2 minutes)


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNAAhwieNhU

    Last edited by H80N; 11-04-2016, 04:01 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Ok seriously...1/4" steel, I would be using at least 3/32" if not 1/8" tungsten and comparable filler metal. When your weld is all gray like that, you're most likely cooking it. It's mild steel, so at the end of the day, if you leave it along to cool and not quench it in water, it'll go back to being mild steel. I doubt it'll break, if that counts for anything. <br />
    <br />
    What you need to do is pad some beads. Just run bead after bead, both ways, switching torch hands, overlapping each bead by about half. You'll figure it out. You'll get all the help you need here too. Just don't have too thin of skin. <br />
    <br />
    I bet there will be all sorts of links posted here for reassures that will be of much help to you in your endeavor to tig weld mo bettah.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Grasshopper...too small of tungsten, too slow of travel speed, uneven filler metal feed, uneven travel speed...torch angle and arc length not good too I'm going to guess....<br />
    <br />
    But for first weld...grasshopper...you join the metal...so practice! <br />
    <br />
    Wax on!!! Wax off!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • lpmartin
    started a topic How do you all feel about constructive criticism?

    How do you all feel about constructive criticism?

    1/4" mild steel
    1/16" 2% Thoriated Tungsten @ 3mm protrusion
    #5 cup
    120A, but with a pedal
    Argon with a flow of 20
    DC, HF, RMT STD
    Mating surfaces sanded shiny on outer corner, no prep on inner corner.

    You're looking at my first attempt to join two pieces using TIG. That's an ugly result, if I do say so myself. But there seems to be decent penatration, little brown soot or white chalky fuzz. What can you tell me I did wrong? What can I do better? Call me grasshopper...
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