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Ford new truck aluminum welding

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  • aametalmaster
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    But most of them are still living at home with mommy and daddy too.
    Yup and a 4 wheeler and a big trailer. I see it everyday and thank God I just bought a truck when I was 18 and they were less than 3 grand new...Bob

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  • Olivero
    replied
    Originally posted by aametalmaster View Post

    I will agree for the trucks welded at home. But for daily repair in a body shop setting how many do you know of that employ Tig welders?. Not talking high end shops that specialize in aluminum repairs. Most corner bodyshops have migs because almost anyone can use them with somewhat good results. But if I was spending 70 grand on a new aluminum truck and it got wrecked. I would cringe at some crap work most shops are putting out. And most insurance companies aren't going to pay for the high end shops better work. They will say its a body shop they should be able to fix it, right. I have been there and unless you want to pay out of pocket to pick and choose who does the work you prob will get the guy at the corner with the mig. Just my .02...Bob
    For me personally, I would weld it myself. If i had the machine that can run it hot enough, there is no reason I could not do it myself.

    If a Mig welder did anything to my truck, I would very harshly inspect the weld and as much as I can, verify it was done properly. I don't like MIG over TIG, I have welded 8 foot seems with TIG because I like it better. MIG would have taken 1 hour, took 8 hours with TIG, pedaling with my knees but was still worth it in the end.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I agree. I see these young guys starting into the fire service, good steady job now. First thing they do is run out and buy a fancy shmancy new truck, then max a credit card out putting a lift kit and big tires and the like. I bet by the time they've done all that, their truck cost nearly what my house did. But most of them are still living at home with mommy and daddy too.

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  • Auto_Tech
    replied
    Originally posted by aametalmaster View Post

    I will agree for the trucks welded at home. But for daily repair in a body shop setting how many do you know of that employ Tig welders?. Not talking high end shops that specialize in aluminum repairs. Most corner bodyshops have migs because almost anyone can use them with somewhat good results. But if I was spending 70 grand on a new aluminum truck and it got wrecked. I would cringe at some crap work most shops are putting out. And most insurance companies aren't going to pay for the high end shops better work. They will say its a body shop they should be able to fix it, right. I have been there and unless you want to pay out of pocket to pick and choose who does the work you prob will get the guy at the corner with the mig. Just my .02...Bob
    There's something crazy about new truck prices --- not sure how much longer this can continue. I drove old trucks -- 84/5 Dodge W350 (with 88,000 miles), 87 Dodge D250 (with 27,000 miles), 90 F-350 (7.5L gas guzzler), 03 SuperDuty (6.0L), and an old 48 Chevrolet (three glass windows in the rear)...........last time I checked I don't have more than $25,000 in ALL these vehicles. I think it's nutty spending $35K-$70K on a new pickup only to watch it depreciate rapidly the first few years.

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  • aametalmaster
    replied
    Originally posted by Olivero View Post
    If you are doing thin sheet aluminum or a sensitive weld, Tigging will allow you much more control.

    I would choose TIG over MIG any day of the week.
    I will agree for the trucks welded at home. But for daily repair in a body shop setting how many do you know of that employ Tig welders?. Not talking high end shops that specialize in aluminum repairs. Most corner bodyshops have migs because almost anyone can use them with somewhat good results. But if I was spending 70 grand on a new aluminum truck and it got wrecked. I would cringe at some crap work most shops are putting out. And most insurance companies aren't going to pay for the high end shops better work. They will say its a body shop they should be able to fix it, right. I have been there and unless you want to pay out of pocket to pick and choose who does the work you prob will get the guy at the corner with the mig. Just my .02...Bob

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  • Auto_Tech
    replied
    Ford's love affair with aluminum started when Alan Mulally was CEO --- he "grew up" with aluminum from his Boeing days. For most of us in the automotive business, Ford has made some unusual demands on shop equipment and require you to take their training, use their recommended support equipment, etc --- all because of their alloys. I think it's a fad (certainly drives the cost of the vehicle and maintenance) that will be "overcome" by composites ---just like planes. Commercial aircraft started out with very high aluminum content (in some cases almost 75%) now composites have reduced that content dramatically --- same with automobiles in the future. Today's cars are 35% electronics, some aluminum (Ford mainly), some composites. In 15 years they'll be 65% electronics, little if any aluminum and largely composites.

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  • Olivero
    replied
    If you are doing thin sheet aluminum or a sensitive weld, Tigging will allow you much more control.

    I would choose TIG over MIG any day of the week.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I watched a YouTube video on this exact topic, but I can't remember the channel or the title. But I bet you could do a search and find the answer. I know for sure the topic was tig welding ford aluminum body panels. I know you don't want tig, but you may not have much other choice.

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  • Stefen7
    replied
    Originally posted by WillieB View Post
    I've long wanted to build a Jeep body of aluminum. VT roads are salted heavily.
    Many DOT have switched from salt to calcium chloride or other liquid brine materials. There was a problem with aluminum fuel tanks and trailer frames on transport trucks corroding very quickly because of the new chemicals. Worse than rust on steel. The solution was expensive protective coatings that need to be monitored closely. Unlike brown rust on steel that is obvious, aluminum corrosion is not.

    The only real protection against corrosion on steel or aluminum is a high quality paint.
    Would hate to see you put the money and effort into a cool project and have it destroyed by corrosion.
    Last edited by Stefen7; 10-26-2016, 11:19 AM.

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  • aametalmaster
    replied
    I have welded it with 4043 wire. But its the alum before its drawn. I got a few pieces for projects...Bob

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  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by WillieB View Post
    I haven't heard much about the new bodies. They are interesting. I've long wanted to build a Jeep body of aluminum. VT roads are salted heavily. A few old Land Rovers are still around with aluminum bodies after many years of service in salt. I once had one. Be very careful to keep dielectric spacers between aluminum and steel in good condition. Aluminum will fast corrode around the bolts.

    It'd be Ford's way to use non weldable aluminum in these bodies. Time will tell.

    Willie
    According to Forbes... it is 6XXXX series Alu..... so quite weldable.....





    What kind of aluminum is the 2015 Ford F-150 made of?

    The majority of the truck body is 6,000-series alloy aluminum, which is a heat-treatable alloy aluminum. Depending on the mix that you put in the alloy, but certainly more a function of how long you heat-treat it, you can get all manner of properties out of this aluminum. Some of our structural elements and our extruded pieces are heat-treated, and we end up with stronger pieces than the steel we’re replacing.


    http://www.forbes.com/sites/matthewd.../#2c0293156878

    Last edited by H80N; 10-26-2016, 08:11 AM.

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  • WillieB
    replied
    I haven't heard much about the new bodies. They are interesting. I've long wanted to build a Jeep body of aluminum. VT roads are salted heavily. A few old Land Rovers are still around with aluminum bodies after many years of service in salt. I once had one. Be very careful to keep dielectric spacers between aluminum and steel in good condition. Aluminum will fast corrode around the bolts.

    It'd be Ford's way to use non weldable aluminum in these bodies. Time will tell.

    Willie

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  • metal-doctor
    replied
    Interesting guess I thought same as you but after 34 years welding I am still learning & accept advice. Thanks

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  • aametalmaster
    replied
    I can agree with bigger filler. Doesn't make sense for normal folks like us but it works. I ran a robotic welding cell making parts for Harley Davidson. We were having problems with burn thru and I said I would use smaller dia wire. We were using .035 and I said run .023. So they had the Foronis rep come in and he changed the wire to .045 I said it will never work. But it did and made a nicer weld. I never would have thought that...Bob

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  • metal-doctor
    replied
    We actually tried an esab rebel with spoolgun the other day. Sent into the autobody experts at the the college to be checked and they said no good because panel broke beside the weld in destructive testing. Amperage adjustment allowed a pretty nice weld as far as looks. They said it failed because of porosity .when weld was ground down.I disaree because it broke beside weld So then they said must have a 350P or the equivalent to allow pulse welding. Porosity came from back side of panel because of primer. I do not know how you can properly clean the back side of panel when it is attatched to vehicle.You can clean the piece to be installed but not the remaining attatched side.Ang get this they want .047 filler. Don't know why we need a horse to pull the tail off a mouse!!!

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