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what size miller mig should I buy to make some heavy duty 3500 lb axle type trailer

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  • H80N
    replied
    RubaDub.............

    I took the liberty of posting a link to your website on the Motorsports forum

    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...storation-site

    GREAT INFO....!!!!!...............

    Leave a comment:


  • Bls repair
    replied
    Learning curve depends on the person ,some people catch on right away some people never get it.Most common gas for mig is 75%argon 25% co2.

    Leave a comment:


  • E350
    replied
    Ryan, I will try to take a picture of the weld I am talking about.

    H80N, coming from a newbie like me, trust me, you guys should not just answer the OP's specific question. But look deeper into what he is planning to weld, etc. And I know you guys are doing that. Rob, you probably know more than me, but as a newbie, I often find out when I am looking for answers that I am asking the wrong question.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    The MM252 would be an excellent choice

    https://www.millerwelds.com/equipmen...-welder-m00218

    The MIG resources section should help your friend get started quickly and on the correct footing

    https://www.millerwelds.com/resource...ding-resources



    BTW.... Nice Website....................

    http://1969supersport.com/

    Welcome Aboard...............
    Last edited by H80N; 09-11-2016, 12:24 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • rubadub
    replied
    Wow thanks men, all good information. Here's a little on me. I have a Millermatic 135 with a co2 argon tank that I can weld pretty good with. I worked with a old welder back in 1960 for about a year and a half with acetylene/oxygen welding and cutting and bending so I have a little bit of knowledge, but I am not sure on what to get. I have a 50 year old Hmong friend two blocks away that can speak some English and I have had him do a little welding on the one I have but he doesn't have a clue on penetration. I had a miller sidekick years ago that I did a lot of bodywork with but I think I'm at the right place to get some answers thanks to you guys.

    I have talked to one pretty good welder and I contacted the local senior center for a builder about 15 years back and the older gentlemen helped me through the start of building a garage. So perhaps there might be a welder that could teach my friend how to weld, and I agree with you guys on a stick welder but it might be a long process to teach him how to weld. I would really like to get the new millermatic 252. I know it will take some time but besides my welding I was a tool and die maker and I like to fabricate metal here and there for home projects. I have my own home grown web site 1969supersport.com

    I have two 30' x 50' garages the one has a overhead natural gas furnace and lit up like a hospital super insulated with a paint booth in it, so I'm geared up to work in Northeast Wisconsin weather, I'm just old and don't want to do that much welding.

    The two issues I have is how long will it take to get my buddy up to speed to understand weld penetration and will the 252 be the one to go with him doing the welding, and that would be a co2/argon tank or whatever you men think I should get.

    Thanks again men, looking forward to any guidance you will share with me.

    Rob

    Leave a comment:


  • Bls repair
    replied
    I Would go with the biggest you can afford ,starting with the 212 .You can dial down power ,you can't dial it up if you don't have it.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Just about anybody can produce decent sound welds with MIG ..........

    PROVIDED they have decent equipment and follow the basics in cleanliness and prep....

    Fortunately there are free resources to give them a good start..............

    https://www.millerwelds.com/resource...ding-resources

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    It's interesting that you say you've seen the prettiest of tig welds with no penetration. That confuses me a little. With wire feed welding, that machine doesn't give two hoots about what you're doing, the filler metal is going down one way or the other. Tig on the other does not work like that and filler metal will be added to the weld puddle to make it pretty. If filler metal is just melted in top of the base metal, it's gonna look like bird poop, no way around it. Of course you can have lack of fusion with tig, particularly at the root, but I've never seen cold lap with tig. <br />
    <br />
    The OP asked specifically about a MIG machine for building trailers. I can't immediately assume he lacks the ability, merely answering his question. And clearly, with half effort, he can make a trailer hold together. Just look at the "professionally" made ones out there.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    That would certainly work. But if all he's gonna be welding is steel trailers, a millermatic in the 250 size would be perfect. Even an old MM250 like mine...but it's not for sale, it's mine, you can't have it...but the 350P is very well spoken of on this forum.
    The Millermatic 350P will certainly handle ANYTHING that you might run in to in building trailers..

    https://www.millerwelds.com/equipmen...-welder-m00151

    FWIW.... I love mine...........

    But I agree... with Ryan..... A MM252 or any of the machines in the 250 amp class should easily handle it.....

    including the old workhorse MM200 ( 270 amps @ 40% Duty cycle )......... lotsa choices

    Leave a comment:


  • E350
    replied
    Because I am a crappy welder and can't advise you from my personal experience, I am just going to repeat what I was told (I will find the link if I can) when I raised a similar question on another welding forum, I was criticized for even considering the mig process for such critical welds -- even though I have one of the more powerful MillerMatic mig machines, the MillerMatic 350P. I was advised that it is too easy to produce "cold welds" with the mig process.

    Rather, I was advised to use stick with a 6010 root pass followed by 7018. So, I went out and bought a used Miller Thunderbolt XL for ~$175-$200 and have started to learn how to stick.

    I now like stick a lot. Because you can do it outside and I can't fit a trailer in my little "shop." But stick is hard to learn and I am still learning. And 6010 is harder to learn than 7018.

    Stick is different than mig. With mig you pull the trigger and weld. With a smaller welder, penetration is problem, because as Aeronca41 says, the weld lays on top. (I have even seen the absolute prettiest of TIG welds with poor penetration - which I wouldn't have suspected if I couldn't had looked at the backside of the butt joint.)

    With a MillerMatic 350P, burn through can be a problem -- and that's a good thing, that means to me that you will have good penetration once you dial it back for your material.

    With stick, starting and maintaining the arc without getting the stick stuck on the metal and having to unclamp the electrode or bend it off quick is a big problem. Burn through is almost always a problem -- and that's a good thing, that means that you will have good penetration once you dial back in for your material.

    So, for your intended application, I like stick. Simple. No gas. Penetration. Can be done outdoors. And you won't later be criticized for the process you used on such a critical project such as a trailer.

    Since I am just repeating what I was told rather than speaking from experience, I would like to hear what others have to say.
    Last edited by E350; 09-11-2016, 10:19 AM.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    That would certainly work. But if all he's gonna be welding is steel trailers, a millermatic in the 250 size would be perfect. Even an old MM250 like mine...but it's not for sale, it's mine, you can't have it...but the 350P is very well spoken of on this forum.

    Leave a comment:


  • OscarJr
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    Have you guys seen some of the trailers being built by the "manufacturers" these days? Horrible work! Awful welds! I bought a small enclosed trailer the year we did drag week, drove to Georgia and picked it up when we got our engine parts from Jon Kaase's shop. Ended up having to reweld several members and weld one that wasn't welded at all. I called the company and they told me that if I didn't like the work they do then to bring it back because that's how they weld em. I hope that's not the kind of trailer company you're gonna have Rob.
    Yup, some of that stuff is horrible. Get a 350P. Done.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Have you guys seen some of the trailers being built by the "manufacturers" these days? Horrible work! Awful welds! I bought a small enclosed trailer the year we did drag week, drove to Georgia and picked it up when we got our engine parts from Jon Kaase's shop. Ended up having to reweld several members and weld one that wasn't welded at all. I called the company and they told me that if I didn't like the work they do then to bring it back because that's how they weld em. I hope that's not the kind of trailer company you're gonna have Rob.

    Leave a comment:


  • MMW
    replied
    Go buy a trailer you want, it will be cheaper than building it.

    If you must do it yourself then a Miller 211 would be the minimum machine I would get. It would be light duty for production though but is capable for small utility trailers. A 252 would be best especially if building car/equipment trailers.

    Leave a comment:


  • aametalmaster
    replied
    I made axles for 5 different trailer companies back in the day. And made trailers for 3 of them. 1 company was all aluminum so just the axles...Bob

    Leave a comment:

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