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Millermatic 200 vs 211 ?

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  • #46
    The MM200 is an industrial level machine. It's one he asked about. Now the multimatic 200 I would not consider an industrial duty machine.<br />
    <br />
    And then he asked about a better machine that he can tig weld thin aluminum with. To which he was given sound recommendations. <br />
    <br />
    Most of the time, equipment recommendations here are backed by personal experience. You're recommending machines, that you've never used and probably know little about, based on the price tag. Cost of ownership is often far more valuable than the initial price. I'm not saying Lincoln is junk, I am saying that I'm not a fan of their made in Mexico stuff, but guess what....I own one. I can say with all certainty that it was not a good investment of my money and I would not recommend that line of products to people that ask. <br />
    <br />
    But I must be colorblind.

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    • #47
      He was just confused between the MM200 and the Multimatic 200. He was asking about the Multimatic 200 because he wanted a 110V machine. Which the MM200 deff isn't...Bob
      Bob Wright

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      • #48
        I figured as much. I really like the size of the multimatic 200. What do you think about that machine overall, Bob? Good customer feedback?

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
          I figured as much. I really like the size of the multimatic 200. What do you think about that machine overall, Bob? Good customer feedback?
          I really like it. Then the NEW Multi matic 215 came out. Supposed to be better but i like the Muliti 200 better. I like the plastic case better. And i have not sold one yet of either model. By the time i do a new Multi 125 will be out. Just wish they were AC DC but i know it would be bigger and cost more but it would be worth it, to me anyways...Bob
          Bob Wright

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          • #50
            Folks that have been around for a while might recall what a disaster the lincoln Italian built "Invertec" welders were..........

            that fiasco gave them big black eye and cost users a lot of grief and money

            a hand grenade in a pretty red box............. that trust.. once lost is hard to regain...

            I would tread with caution around their latest Mexican entry...

            Last edited by H80N; 09-12-2016, 10:05 AM.
            .

            *******************************************
            The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

            “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

            Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

            My Blue Stuff:
            Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
            Dynasty 200DX
            Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
            Millermatic 200

            TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

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            • #51
              Originally posted by SFjames View Post
              Hello all,

              I have not done any welding myself since High School and early College. I have spent a lot of time preparing items and assisting for an Journeyman welder to weld on my classic cars, hot rods, and other items. All my own stuff.

              We am building a new garage next spring in a house out of town. The garage-shop will have good space and a lot of 220v plugs. I will be floating between my place in San Francisco and the one in the small town with the shop for 5 more years until I can (I hope) retire.

              We have a couple of classic cars. We have a classic 1949 Aluminum trailer I need to restore, and I want to start on an experimental aircraft. I will move my 1943 Logan Lathe and my 1937 Drill Press from SF to the shop once I get it done next year this time.

              I need a welder. I need to practice with for the next 5 months, with the Journeyman looking over my shoulder from time to time. That way I can do some item myself for the new garage shop.

              I need 110V for here in SF. That is all I have in my garage here and that is not going to change.

              So, A Multi Voltage machine is a must. I also don't want to deal with two machines. I don't need a machine to be "portable", but I do need to be able to move it occasionally back and forth.

              I have zeroed in on the Millermatic 200 or the new 211.

              I looked over the specifications. It is hard to compare the duty cycle as they don't show the specifications at the same output AMP's. Nice obfuscation Miller. As far as I can tell they are close.

              What I do not understand is why the price spread between the two. They look close on specifications, just the weight between them.

              Can anyone shed any light on this?

              I doubt I will every need to weld anything thicker that 3/8 inch in my hobby work, and even if I did I could make multiple passes. A hobby is rarely done in a hurry. If I get to building or restoring and antique airplane, I would be working with chrome molly tubing. The skin of the trailer and possible some parts of an airplane would be very thin aluminum.

              Help guide a newbie here.

              Thanks, James


              I have a Millermatic 211 --- I'm not Red, Blue or whatever, but the MillerMatic 211 I use on automotive sheet metal repairs is about as perfect a machine as you'll ever find. I've owned three or four MIGs over the years and this one is just a gem.

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
                I figured as much. I really like the size of the multimatic 200. What do you think about that machine overall, Bob? Good customer feedback?
                If i was going to say something bad about the Multimatic 200 it would be the gun. The Bernard gun is a turn off for me. Parts are twice as much and i just don't like it. If i could get one sans gun, cheaper i would be happier. I can't buy the welder and sell the gun because no one wants them and i have plenty of M-15 guns i can use...Bob
                Bob Wright

                Comment


                • #53
                  I have similar needs and looked at a Lincoln 210 MP last year. I was pretty close to buying one, and had also looked at the Miller Multimatic 200. In the end, I bought the Miller Multimatic 200 for lots of small reasons. In the meantime a good friend, who welds more than I, bought a Miller "new" 211. We compare notes frequently.

                  I wanted a multiprocess machine to learn on. He wanted a MIG to assemble all of his many projects with. Here are some of the things we learned.

                  1. The quality of C100 MIG on both machines is really good. Nicer than people who A/B MIG with C25 and C100 without taking advantage of the arc algorithms in the Miller software. C100 keeps the gas costs down and gets a little more penetration. With the Miller new 211 and Multimatic 200 there is less splatter than with welders without C100 arc algorithms.
                  2. The Multimatic is a nice portable commercial use machine. It is really more than I need as a hobbyist, but having the ability to get very low amperage on TIG, as an example, lets me learn and do things like brazing and silver soldering, which I could not do with other TIG units.
                  3. The Multimatic does not have AC TIG. Bummer, but for what I was planning on, my need was very low, and somewhere down the line, if I feel the need for AC TIG, I can pick up a unit, and it won't incrementally break the bank.
                  4. MIG on the Multimatic 200 is great. I only had gas welding experience prior to my purchase, and I was making nice looking welds the first couple of test arcs I made. The learning curve was fast, and I am very happy with the rate I have been able to learn on this machine. From what I can tell, my experience with MIG would have been probably about the same with the new 211, just at a lower price point.
                  5. Having separate solenoid valves for MIG and TIG is really nice when switching processes. The Multimatic 200 has that.
                  6. Small point, but the Multimatic 200 fan is on demand, and is much quieter than the Lincoln 210 MP fan which runs all the time.
                  7. The Multimatic 200 works well with 6010, 6011 and 6013.
                  8. The Q-150 gun on the Multimatic is nicer than the M-100 gun on the new 211, which the LWS writes off as "no kidding, the Bernard gun is 2X the price, it better work nicer!"
                  9. If I were buying today, and I wasn't as fond of the portability, I would probably get the slightly less portable and very slightly less capable Miller Multimatic 215. I'm not doing production work, and the extra $$$ in my pocket would be nice.
                  10. All that said, I am happy with my Multimatic 200, and glad that I didn't settle for a 211 MIG only or a Lincoln 210 MP which matches on the processes but falls short on the capabilities. At the time I thought the Multimatic 200 was the best match for me, and it did have a slightly higher price. When I was done with my analysis of a 210MP vs the 200, I figured I paid $200 to 250 for the less tangible differences between the two. Since then I have become convinced I made the right choice. For someone always second guessing his actions, I am pretty confident. If the 215 were to have been available at the time, it would have been a different, and easier decision.

                  Hope that helps a little.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by mongobird View Post
                    I have similar needs and looked at a Lincoln 210 MP last year. I was pretty close to buying one, and had also looked at the Miller Multimatic 200. In the end, I bought the Miller Multimatic 200 for lots of small reasons. In the meantime a good friend, who welds more than I, bought a Miller "new" 211. We compare notes frequently.

                    I wanted a multiprocess machine to learn on. He wanted a MIG to assemble all of his many projects with. Here are some of the things we learned.

                    1. The quality of C100 MIG on both machines is really good. Nicer than people who A/B MIG with C25 and C100 without taking advantage of the arc algorithms in the Miller software. C100 keeps the gas costs down and gets a little more penetration. With the Miller new 211 and Multimatic 200 there is less splatter than with welders without C100 arc algorithms.
                    2. The Multimatic is a nice portable commercial use machine. It is really more than I need as a hobbyist, but having the ability to get very low amperage on TIG, as an example, lets me learn and do things like brazing and silver soldering, which I could not do with other TIG units.
                    3. The Multimatic does not have AC TIG. Bummer, but for what I was planning on, my need was very low, and somewhere down the line, if I feel the need for AC TIG, I can pick up a unit, and it won't incrementally break the bank.
                    4. MIG on the Multimatic 200 is great. I only had gas welding experience prior to my purchase, and I was making nice looking welds the first couple of test arcs I made. The learning curve was fast, and I am very happy with the rate I have been able to learn on this machine. From what I can tell, my experience with MIG would have been probably about the same with the new 211, just at a lower price point.
                    5. Having separate solenoid valves for MIG and TIG is really nice when switching processes. The Multimatic 200 has that.
                    6. Small point, but the Multimatic 200 fan is on demand, and is much quieter than the Lincoln 210 MP fan which runs all the time.
                    7. The Multimatic 200 works well with 6010, 6011 and 6013.
                    8. The Q-150 gun on the Multimatic is nicer than the M-100 gun on the new 211, which the LWS writes off as "no kidding, the Bernard gun is 2X the price, it better work nicer!"
                    9. If I were buying today, and I wasn't as fond of the portability, I would probably get the slightly less portable and very slightly less capable Miller Multimatic 215. I'm not doing production work, and the extra $$$ in my pocket would be nice.
                    10. All that said, I am happy with my Multimatic 200, and glad that I didn't settle for a 211 MIG only or a Lincoln 210 MP which matches on the processes but falls short on the capabilities. At the time I thought the Multimatic 200 was the best match for me, and it did have a slightly higher price. When I was done with my analysis of a 210MP vs the 200, I figured I paid $200 to 250 for the less tangible differences between the two. Since then I have become convinced I made the right choice. For someone always second guessing his actions, I am pretty confident. If the 215 were to have been available at the time, it would have been a different, and easier decision.

                    Hope that helps a little.
                    Nice analysis!

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Nice. Thanks for posting.....Bob
                      Bob Wright

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        I ended up with a Miller 211. What happened was my welder had a man working for him that was heading out of California. His wife had purchased the Miler 211 for him about 3 years ago. They were splitting up and so he was selling it and my welder gave me a call knowing I was looking.

                        The unit has had almost no use as it was a home machine for this guy not his work machine. I got it plus an owned bottle with a big bottle cart for $800 delivered.

                        Now I have to get a hood and some pliers and jacket....

                        The Money I saved on this can go to a TIG unit should I decide down the road I need it.

                        Thanks for all the help folks! James

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Well, at least it only took five years to make up your mind!

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by SFjames View Post
                            I ended up with a Miller 211.
                            Well without commenting on what or how your going to use the 211 that was a good price for either an inverter or transformer machine............I have one of each in 2 different locations......and I really like them for portability and performance on steel up to 3/8" ......Enjoy!

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              The 211 transformer is probably the best little mig welder I’ve ever used to be perfectly honest. I don’t own one, but a shop I did some work in had one and I used it a good bit.

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