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  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    That's what I do, just a quick tap to the pedal long enough to get the post flow to kick on and purge the line. I doubt anyone really thought any of us did that all the while pouring the pedal to it.
    Agree. I don't think anyone assumed the pedal was down. Just the concern that something crazy and unexpected hit the pedal and wiped out an eye. Dog runs into the shop, something falls, etc. , etc. Some car accidents, crushing injuries, fires, and other terrible happenings sometimes have incredibly unlikely beginnings, and guarding against even the extremely unlikely is good for the future welfare of the ol' fragile body.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    That's what I do, just a quick tap to the pedal long enough to get the post flow to kick on and purge the line. I doubt anyone really thought any of us did that all the while pouring the pedal to it.

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  • Olivero
    replied
    That would give you some pretty good idea of what can happen I am sure. Glad I never had much happen to my squishy orbs.

    I don't really care so much in terms of what the number says, nor will the weld being made, all that matters is that there is enough gas to insulate the weld from the atmosphere, I have had my gauge tell me I had 10 cb/h going or whatever it says when the bottle was empty, a flow meter would have worked then but also tactile senses work in that situation which is really where its needed.

    I am no master of air or flow calculation but I know if I am doing a fillet weld where my cup is sitting 1/2" away from the weld I know I need more gas then when I am doing butt welds where my cup is lifted up just enough to let the rod through, That's where the tactile senses come in handy until you have done it enough to know the numbers.

    I tap my pedal and let it go on post flow and THEN point the cup toward my body, not while holding the pedal down but I do agree, not the best way to do it.

    That's why someone made flow meters and I will be getting one.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    Well I happen to have perfectly calibrated creeks and can tell exactly what my flow rate is by blowing it across my creek.<br />
    <br />
    ...but it only seems to work when I'm looking directly at the flow meter....<br />
    <br />
    But seriously, I generally only do that to verify my line is purged and flowing like it should be. I have one of them doodads, I only use it to verify my flow meter or to make adjustments from time to time.

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  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by Olivero View Post
    Wow, this went to a whole new level.

    Maybe it is a bad idea after all, probably should have never suggested it, I just have the same issue with not being able to feel it anywhere else. Flowmeter's a good idea though, just put in a request for one.

    Thanks.
    I have a friend that is an eye trauma surgeon.....

    Sooooooo..... I have heard many stories on how folk destroyed their sight................ mostly thoughtless acts...

    there are lotsa ways to commit mayhem on those squishy orbs.......

    enough to give me the heeby-jeebys just thinking about it...................
    Last edited by H80N; 08-17-2016, 06:57 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Olivero
    replied
    Originally posted by Aeronca41 View Post

    That's one of the best things about this group-you just never know where a topic will end up, and there is an astounding amount of knowledge just waiting to be tapped. And sometimes I learn something I didn't know I didn't know. :-)
    Yup, sure is. I come here quite often to check on new subjects, I mainly got into this because every time I googled a question, there would be a Miller forum subject with an answer or guiding me the right place. Now I use it as a tool for my day to day work.

    Great, thanks.

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  • Aeronca41
    replied
    Originally posted by Olivero View Post
    Wow, this went to a whole new level.

    Maybe it is a bad idea after all, probably should have never suggested it, I just have the same issue with not being able to feel it anywhere else. Flowmeter's a good idea though, just put in a request for one.

    Thanks.
    That's one of the best things about this group-you just never know where a topic will end up, and there is an astounding amount of knowledge just waiting to be tapped. And sometimes I learn something I didn't know I didn't know. :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Olivero
    replied
    Wow, this went to a whole new level.

    Maybe it is a bad idea after all, probably should have never suggested it, I just have the same issue with not being able to feel it anywhere else. Flowmeter's a good idea though, just put in a request for one.

    Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • aametalmaster
    replied
    Originally posted by bcjm View Post
    Do I need to ground my machine to earth or the ground from the outlet is sufficient?
    A few places i worked had a ground wire driven right into the ground or hooked from the machine frame to a building support. And some just used the plug. The plug should be fine...Bob

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  • bcjm
    replied
    Thank you. The flow meter is a good idea instead of pointing the torch to the eye ball.
    Do I need to ground my machine to earth or the ground from the outlet is sufficient?

    Leave a comment:


  • Miller Welders
    replied
    Hi bcjm,

    The TIG process often uses HF to start and/or maintain the arc. In order to prevent issues, it is recommended that you use proper safety equipment, technique, good condition welding accessories, and (on equipment such as that mentioned) maintain the HF generation system/points properly.

    Also, if you are verifying gas flow, we recommend that you watch the flow indicator at the gas supply or measure it with a flow measurement device (like other Forum members have recommended here) rather than trying to "feel" gas flow.

    If you truly have concerns about the proper condition of your equipment, please contact your local Miller Authorized Service Center to have them check the unit.

    We hope this helps!

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeronca41
    replied
    I just ordered a Flowmeter. Thanks for the link.
    Last edited by Aeronca41; 08-17-2016, 07:24 AM.

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  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
    I've ground out and rewelded some stuff that was "welded" by someone that might have been blind. But I've also seen some welds that a blind person could've done better. Maybe that guy used his eyeball to check for post flow too. <br />
    <br />
    I was tig brazing some cast iron on AC with aluminum bronze earlier, had a little double hitched giddyup in my torch hand and stuck the tip of the tungsten right to the filler rod...gave me a fun little HF buzz right through my clean, dry glove. I'd say welding gear is made with just your vanilla textiles. No adamantium or unobtanium or any other special electrical insulating faraday flimflams. At least not the Miller tig gloves.
    I usually get my HF TIG thrill from putting a sweaty elbow on the bench at exactly the wrong time........
    ...... Operator Brain Fade...........
    Last edited by H80N; 08-16-2016, 06:41 PM.

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  • ryanjones2150
    replied
    I've ground out and rewelded some stuff that was "welded" by someone that might have been blind. But I've also seen some welds that a blind person could've done better. Maybe that guy used his eyeball to check for post flow too. <br />
    <br />
    I was tig brazing some cast iron on AC with aluminum bronze earlier, had a little double hitched giddyup in my torch hand and stuck the tip of the tungsten right to the filler rod...gave me a fun little HF buzz right through my clean, dry glove. I'd say welding gear is made with just your vanilla textiles. No adamantium or unobtanium or any other special electrical insulating faraday flimflams. At least not the Miller tig gloves.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by Meltedmetal View Post
    In the interest of your eye ball you could buy one of these:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Pro-Argon-Co...-/121715836601

    It's cheap and it is a second opinion on your regulator.
    A nozzle flowmeter is an excelent idea

    Leave a comment:

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